Author Topic: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74  (Read 1473109 times)

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siamesecat2965

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2850 on: October 01, 2012, 03:29:00 PM »
Reminds me of a former boss. One year for Secretary's Day, he gave the secretaries- and all the non-clinical staff- a nice package of gifts that would be valued at over $100 apiece. The clinical staff got nothing, because 'there's no Clinician's Day'.  He just couldn't see how it would affect morale among the clinicians not to get anything while the non-clinical staff were running around excited with their gift bags.

I don't get bosses like this.  I'm guessing the clinical staff also helped keep things running smoothly, etc. and to leave them out like that is just wrong.  my former employer, a law firm used to give all employees a gift on Secretary's Day, not just the admin staff. Everyone from the attorneys down to the mailroom staff.  Nothing fancy; one year it was a pair of movie tickets, and another, a small box of gourmet muffins, but at least they treated everyone the same, and the card that went out to each employee said as much.

TurtleDove

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2851 on: October 01, 2012, 05:06:15 PM »
After 9/11 my law firm office was brainstorming ways to prepare in case our highrise was attacked (downtown in major US city, though not MAJOR city and not one attacked).  An all employee meeting was held, and our office manager demonstrated for us a method of sawing through the window and parachuting out to safety (which is absurd for a variety of reasons) and then one of the named parthers explained that "each lawyer would get a parachute."  Apparently we were supposed to just hold on to our support staff or go tandem or something? 

We didn't end up going with the parachute plan. 

BB-VA

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2852 on: October 01, 2012, 05:11:21 PM »
Reminds me of a former boss. One year for Secretary's Day, he gave the secretaries- and all the non-clinical staff- a nice package of gifts that would be valued at over $100 apiece. The clinical staff got nothing, because 'there's no Clinician's Day'.  He just couldn't see how it would affect morale among the clinicians not to get anything while the non-clinical staff were running around excited with their gift bags.

I don't get bosses like this.  I'm guessing the clinical staff also helped keep things running smoothly, etc. and to leave them out like that is just wrong.  my former employer, a law firm used to give all employees a gift on Secretary's Day, not just the admin staff. Everyone from the attorneys down to the mailroom staff.  Nothing fancy; one year it was a pair of movie tickets, and another, a small box of gourmet muffins, but at least they treated everyone the same, and the card that went out to each employee said as much.

Who got paid more?   

One of the reasons for Administrative Professionals Day is for employers to show appreciation to their support staff who are usually not paid as well, but work just as hard to keep the company going.

I am not saying the boss was right - in fact, I think it was downright rude to leave the clinicians out.   It should have been everybody or nobody.

I have been an adminstrative professional all my career.  I received exactly one house plant over all 35+ years in celebration of the day.   So, maybe I am a tad cynical about the whole thing.  In fact, I am one of those who believe in only 3 holidays - Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas.  All the others are Hallmark (or insert your choice of company) Holidays and exist only to profit others.
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NyaChan

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2853 on: October 01, 2012, 05:14:20 PM »
After 9/11 my law firm office was brainstorming ways to prepare in case our highrise was attacked (downtown in major US city, though not MAJOR city and not one attacked).  An all employee meeting was held, and our office manager demonstrated for us a method of sawing through the window and parachuting out to safety (which is absurd for a variety of reasons) and then one of the named parthers explained that "each lawyer would get a parachute."  Apparently we were supposed to just hold on to our support staff or go tandem or something? 

We didn't end up going with the parachute plan.

And I just burst out into laughter in a relatively quiet public lounge :D  Totally worth the "What is wrong with her?" looks

Sirius

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2854 on: October 01, 2012, 05:15:21 PM »
I know how that can be.  My boss was going to take the people working on our account who work at the office.  But what happened was that the lead MT asked one of the others on our account who works at home to cover while they were at lunch - a person who lived less than 10 minutes away and who could have joined them in person easily.  The person who lived close by got quite upset because it seemed to her that the boss had "forgotten" that she lived only 10 minutes away and she said she felt like the only one not invited to a party. 

I think they should have asked me to cover, since I'm in Oregon and the office is in Ohio, and given the people who work at home close by the option of joining them.   

Iris

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2855 on: October 01, 2012, 05:49:22 PM »
Reminds me of a former boss. One year for Secretary's Day, he gave the secretaries- and all the non-clinical staff- a nice package of gifts that would be valued at over $100 apiece. The clinical staff got nothing, because 'there's no Clinician's Day'.  He just couldn't see how it would affect morale among the clinicians not to get anything while the non-clinical staff were running around excited with their gift bags.

I don't get bosses like this.  I'm guessing the clinical staff also helped keep things running smoothly, etc. and to leave them out like that is just wrong.  my former employer, a law firm used to give all employees a gift on Secretary's Day, not just the admin staff. Everyone from the attorneys down to the mailroom staff.  Nothing fancy; one year it was a pair of movie tickets, and another, a small box of gourmet muffins, but at least they treated everyone the same, and the card that went out to each employee said as much.

See, I'm a bit with BB-VA on this one. Depending on the job there are people whose work is vital to the company who are rewarded by being paid a lot of money - that's how it is shown that they are appreciated. Admin staff are typically lower paid and (at times) underappreciated. Of course this would have to be taken on a case by case basis because there are many cases where the mainline workers are JUST as underappreciated.

I know when I worked corporate I would have had no problems with the admin staff getting a present on Secretary's day (not really done over here, though). They made half what I made (and I was very junior) but did work hard and do the tedious or unpleasant jobs which meant that I didn't have to do them. Similarly now that I'm a teacher I personally bought a box of chocolates for the photocopy lady last year because she did my photocopying for me, better than I could ever do it, covered rough jobs in an emergency, occasionally had to put up with unpleasant working conditions, and is paid considerably less than me.

As I said it's a case-by-case basis but I don't necessarily think that the idea of rewarding PART of the workforce is necessarily always a bad one.
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Winterlight

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2856 on: October 01, 2012, 08:08:37 PM »
After 9/11 my law firm office was brainstorming ways to prepare in case our highrise was attacked (downtown in major US city, though not MAJOR city and not one attacked).  An all employee meeting was held, and our office manager demonstrated for us a method of sawing through the window and parachuting out to safety (which is absurd for a variety of reasons) and then one of the named parthers explained that "each lawyer would get a parachute."  Apparently we were supposed to just hold on to our support staff or go tandem or something? 

We didn't end up going with the parachute plan.

Wow, that sounds like a horrible, horrible idea. BASE jumping is not for novices, and from what I can tell this would not have worked on 9/11 anyway, between the smoke, turbulence and wind shear. Not to mention the explosions.
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exitzero

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2857 on: October 01, 2012, 09:17:42 PM »
After 9/11 my law firm office was brainstorming ways to prepare in case our highrise was attacked (downtown in major US city, though not MAJOR city and not one attacked).  An all employee meeting was held, and our office manager demonstrated for us a method of sawing through the window and parachuting out to safety (which is absurd for a variety of reasons) and then one of the named parthers explained that "each lawyer would get a parachute."  Apparently we were supposed to just hold on to our support staff or go tandem or something? 

We didn't end up going with the parachute plan.

Our office disaster plan was to have all of management stay home, and the support staff come in and make sure everyone was notified and everything was set up to run with remote staff. The uppers were SHOCKED when it was pointed out by the support staff that if a disaster was bad enough to keep management home, they weren't coming in either! It never occurred to them.

Jocelyn

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2858 on: October 01, 2012, 09:22:04 PM »
Reminds me of a former boss. One year for Secretary's Day, he gave the secretaries- and all the non-clinical staff- a nice package of gifts that would be valued at over $100 apiece. The clinical staff got nothing, because 'there's no Clinician's Day'.  He just couldn't see how it would affect morale among the clinicians not to get anything while the non-clinical staff were running around excited with their gift bags.

I don't get bosses like this.  I'm guessing the clinical staff also helped keep things running smoothly, etc. and to leave them out like that is just wrong.  my former employer, a law firm used to give all employees a gift on Secretary's Day, not just the admin staff. Everyone from the attorneys down to the mailroom staff.  Nothing fancy; one year it was a pair of movie tickets, and another, a small box of gourmet muffins, but at least they treated everyone the same, and the card that went out to each employee said as much.

Who got paid more?   

One of the reasons for Administrative Professionals Day is for employers to show appreciation to their support staff who are usually not paid as well, but work just as hard to keep the company going.

I am not saying the boss was right - in fact, I think it was downright rude to leave the clinicians out.   It should have been everybody or nobody.

I have been an adminstrative professional all my career.  I received exactly one house plant over all 35+ years in celebration of the day.   So, maybe I am a tad cynical about the whole thing.  In fact, I am one of those who believe in only 3 holidays - Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas.  All the others are Hallmark (or insert your choice of company) Holidays and exist only to profit others.

Yes, we were paid more- but then, we were not eligible for overtime. So we could be required to work a 10
 hour day, then get called out during the night for 4-6 hours, and then have to report to work for another 10 hour day the next day. We got paid for weekend call- $1 an hour.  The clinicians had had to obtain higher education, and most of us were paying off student loans. We had to pay for our own licenses, and for most of the continuing education that was required to maintain the license (including travel, hotels and meals out when we went to a workshop).  So while we got paid more, most of that money went for expenses associated with the job.
But I really don't see how it's a matter of etiquette or good business sense to justify thanking some employees for their services, and telling others that they won't be thanked because there's not a Hallmark holiday for their job classification.

nutraxfornerves

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2859 on: October 01, 2012, 10:51:16 PM »
I was always an early-bird. On the first day after my promotion to a management job, I arrived at 7:30 AM to find that the building was closed due to a burst pipe. Staff was being told to "contact your manager" for information. Swell. I'm a manger and I have no idea what to do. Nor did any of the other managers hanging around.

Fortunately, the guy turning away employees knew me. I talked him into letting me into the building so I could retrieve my employee contact list. There was about a foot of water (35 cm) on the floor and it was actually raining in the offices. I got my list and retreated. I found out later how lucky I was--some high voltage lines had gotten loose and were discharging into the water.

I was able to get to an annex building where I commandeered a phone and tried to reach as many people as possible to say "don't come in" because that was all I could do.

I never forgot "contact your manager," as if managers were supposed to have actually been trained in Plans A, B, and C.

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iridaceae

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2860 on: October 02, 2012, 06:22:58 AM »
I have worked a lot of graveyard shifts and I can tell you that they tend to be ignored. At one job Employee of the Month didn't have a graveyard winner for 5 years. Management neither noticed or cared. And they wondered why morale was terrible for graveyard workers. [For those wondering why the workers never complained: they stopped after repeatedly being blown off.]

Elfmama

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2861 on: October 02, 2012, 12:30:37 PM »
After 9/11 my law firm office was brainstorming ways to prepare in case our highrise was attacked (downtown in major US city, though not MAJOR city and not one attacked).  An all employee meeting was held, and our office manager demonstrated for us a method of sawing through the window and parachuting out to safety (which is absurd for a variety of reasons) and then one of the named parthers explained that "each lawyer would get a parachute."  Apparently we were supposed to just hold on to our support staff or go tandem or something? 

We didn't end up going with the parachute plan.

Our office disaster plan was to have all of management stay home, and the support staff come in and make sure everyone was notified and everything was set up to run with remote staff. The uppers were SHOCKED when it was pointed out by the support staff that if a disaster was bad enough to keep management home, they weren't coming in either! It never occurred to them.
They're in good company.  If the US came under nuclear attack, the population of affected cities was supposed to evacuate to certain areas  pre-selected by Congressional committee.  The area where you were to evacuate would be sent to you by US mail after the attack happened.  ::)
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Zenith

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2862 on: October 02, 2012, 12:57:55 PM »
After 9/11 my law firm office was brainstorming ways to prepare in case our highrise was attacked (downtown in major US city, though not MAJOR city and not one attacked).  An all employee meeting was held, and our office manager demonstrated for us a method of sawing through the window and parachuting out to safety (which is absurd for a variety of reasons) and then one of the named parthers explained that "each lawyer would get a parachute."  Apparently we were supposed to just hold on to our support staff or go tandem or something? 

We didn't end up going with the parachute plan.

Guess they didn't want to end up as a Darwin Award eh? I would have lost it laughing in the meeting.


Sirius

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2863 on: October 02, 2012, 05:41:12 PM »
At least the school district Mr. Sirius works for has a system where school closures, etc. are announced on the radio, and if the entire district is closed the drivers don't have to report.  There was one year when the roads got extremely icy, and rather than call school out for the day or even do a late start a supervisor who had never been a bus driver herself (so how she ended up supervising bus drivers is anyone's guess) insisted that the bus drivers come in and have business as usual.  One of the earlier buses, which had to go to a high elevation, slid into a ditch (no students on board).  She was all set to go out and chew the driver out, and as she drove up she also slid into the ditch.  The school district was closed for the day, and that supervisor was soon transferred.  Now the supervisors are all former drivers who have the drivers' and the students' welfare in mind first and foremost.

Although Mr. Sirius told me this morning that a trip he'd taken to pick up a preschooler could have gotten quite interesting, as the directions he'd been given called for him to take an off-ramp off the freeway that didn't actually exist yet (under construction).

HorseFreak

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2864 on: October 02, 2012, 08:32:44 PM »
When I was in college the dean decided if campus was open or not during bad weather. We were in Northern New England so we could handle a lot, but ice storms are bad no matter where you live.

One winter we got a particularly nasty one and the roads were just sheets of perfect ice. The dean looked outside her window and declared that classes were on despite many objecting. A lot of students (including myself) didn't risk the commute that day and I doubt any were counted against in grades considering a professor was killed in a car accident due to the awful conditions.  >:(

The next time we had a light dusting of snow class was cancelled.  ::)