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Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74

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TurtleDove:

--- Quote from: ladyknight1 on January 07, 2013, 08:32:27 AM ---We have a young man who works as our receptionist. He has a Master's degree and only works here because his fiancÚ attends school here. He is doing a fairly good job.

Here is the PD part. He took a week off mid-December, returned and worked a few days before our eleven day holiday break and then took the first three days of the new year off. He is an hourly employee and gets three weeks of vacation a year, and has already used two weeks in the last month, plus the time we were closed. Before he came back to work (today), he had already contacted his manager about taking a week off in March and another in May.

He has only been here a year, so he has used all the time he has accrued, and will not accrue another week by his March requested time off.

--- End quote ---

I am guessing that he does not see the receptionist job as a career so he is not overly concerned about this situation. 

ladymaureen:

--- Quote from: ladyknight1 on January 07, 2013, 08:32:27 AM ---
Here is the PD part. He took a week off mid-December, returned and worked a few days before our eleven day holiday break and then took the first three days of the new year off. He is an hourly employee and gets three weeks of vacation a year, and has already used two weeks in the last month, plus the time we were closed. Before he came back to work (today), he had already contacted his manager about taking a week off in March and another in May. He has only been here a year, so he has used all the time he has accrued, and will not accrue another week by his March requested time off.

--- End quote ---

Well ... it's not necessarily PD to ask for time off. He asked for permission, and his manager said yes. So, that's between him and his manager, right? If he runs out of vacation time, then he may have to take unpaid time. Still not PD, in my opinion.

ladyknight1:

--- Quote from: ladymaureen on January 07, 2013, 07:49:03 PM ---
--- Quote from: ladyknight1 on January 07, 2013, 08:32:27 AM ---
Here is the PD part. He took a week off mid-December, returned and worked a few days before our eleven day holiday break and then took the first three days of the new year off. He is an hourly employee and gets three weeks of vacation a year, and has already used two weeks in the last month, plus the time we were closed. Before he came back to work (today), he had already contacted his manager about taking a week off in March and another in May. He has only been here a year, so he has used all the time he has accrued, and will not accrue another week by his March requested time off.

--- End quote ---

Well ... it's not necessarily PD to ask for time off. He asked for permission, and his manager said yes. So, that's between him and his manager, right? If he runs out of vacation time, then he may have to take unpaid time. Still not PD, in my opinion.

--- End quote ---

There is no allowance for unpaid time barring family or medical leave. He has been told he can't take any more vacation time until he accrues enough leave. Unfortunately, when he is away, we have to find staff to fill in, to keep the front desk manned and it is becoming a big issue.

MissRose:
I would say the person with the issues with the person taking so much time off in a short time as described could be a candidate for PD.  Yes, we are entitled to use our vacation time at work.  At the same time, if I was a manager, I would not have approved so much off time off in that short period of time for someone who is new.  I know I took very little time off right at the beginning of starting a new job that I have been at for a long time now (first 3 to 6 months) to show my dedication and learning my job duties.

Midnight Kitty:
If I had a new employee who was "on vacation" that much, the next time s/he asked for a week off when s/he had not accrued enough vacation time, I would say s/he could take the vacation requested.  In fact, they could stay on vacation because we had learned how to function without them at work. >:D

Long ago, when I first met DH, I was employed with a prestigious engineering firm.  The position was over my head.  They took a chance with me, but it was clear that I needed a master's degree to do the work.  DH, then my fiance, scored last minute tickets to a ball game.  I called in and asked if I could take vacation that day to attend a ball game.  I knew my notice was coming any day & didn't want to miss the game for a job I knew I couldn't keep anyway.  Still ... when they agreed without hesitation, I knew they didn't need me there.  Time for job hunting ...

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