Author Topic: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74  (Read 1086352 times)

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Jocelyn

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4935 on: November 23, 2013, 06:39:12 PM »
'If you can get this man to work for you, you will be truly fortunate.'

bopper

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4936 on: November 23, 2013, 07:17:55 PM »
"No one would be better at this job than X."  Take that any way you like.

or "You would be lucky to get him to work for you."  equally ambiguous


From Catbert's peformance generator:

His usefulness to the division is self evident and he has been responsible for the changes in our work group dynamics. Mr. Evans shows potential for unbounded improvement. Many employees have indicated that they are eager to comment on his work and he was tasked with many assignments this year. The quality of his work is well known. A reevaluation of his salary is long overdue. Such an employee demonstrates the importance of proper recruiting. He does the kind of work you don't expect to see today. Not surprisingly, as an employee, he is a management textbook example and many wonder at the extent of his knowledge.


RooRoo

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4937 on: November 23, 2013, 10:07:02 PM »
Speaking of Catbert giving references - I've always loved this one:
http://dilbert.com/strips/comic/2005-10-08/
"Someday we must write a book of Etiquette for sensible people," said Mrs. Morland, "though apart from a few rules it really boils down to an educated mind and a kind heart." ~ Angela Thirkell, Never Too Late

onikenbai

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4938 on: November 23, 2013, 10:20:43 PM »
We call them "team players" as in it takes a team of people to support his employment at the company his work is so bad.

HappilyInsane

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4939 on: November 24, 2013, 12:04:11 AM »
My most recent former coworker decided it would be a neat idea to just do a "no sale" on the register instead of ringing food items up and stick the money off to the side for herself. While standing directly under a security camera pointed directly at said register. She was seriously shocked that she got fired.

Nikko-chan

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4940 on: November 24, 2013, 05:17:20 AM »
My most recent former coworker decided it would be a neat idea to just do a "no sale" on the register instead of ringing food items up and stick the money off to the side for herself. While standing directly under a security camera pointed directly at said register. She was seriously shocked that she got fired.

I.... what? How does that even...? *Shakes head*

hjaye

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4941 on: November 24, 2013, 10:08:56 AM »
My most recent former coworker decided it would be a neat idea to just do a "no sale" on the register instead of ringing food items up and stick the money off to the side for herself. While standing directly under a security camera pointed directly at said register. She was seriously shocked that she got fired.

Ahhhh yes, just like the son of my first wife.  He had a summer job at a water park working in a concession stand.  He and some of his coworkers thought it was a great way to make some extra money.  After they were all caught and fired (restitution was made so there were no charges filed) I asked him if at the end of the night they had to do an inventory count (how many hot dogs and hot dog buns were left, and other items) he said yes.  I asked him if he knew why they did that, and he said no.  I explained to him if there were fifty hot dogs in inventory at the end of the night, and the next night there were 25, then his employer would expect to see sales equal to the cost of 25 hot dogs.  If there was only enough money in the till for 20 hot dogs, then the employer would figure out someone was stealing five hot dogs.

That was a bit of a light bulb moment for him.

*inviteseller

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4942 on: November 24, 2013, 10:23:26 AM »
I worked at a large department store as a front end manager and it absolutely floored me at the amount and lengths the cashiers would go to to steal.  We had a policy that employees were NOT allowed to ring up family and friends..why, you ask?  Because cashiers sister would come through the line with $400 worth of clothing and cashier would ring up maybe every 5th piece, and usually the cheapest items (they always got caught!).  And the pocketing of money was a biggie too..because obviously those readings we took and the counts we made would not show a drawer short.  Not only did we have cameras, but in the security office was a cash register that, when a cashiers number was punched in, it would ring up the sale simultaneously and we caught many short ringing sales.  They were always shocked they were fired and prosecuted.

PeterM

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4943 on: November 24, 2013, 01:59:34 PM »
Ahhhh yes, just like the son of my first wife.  He had a summer job at a water park working in a concession stand.  He and some of his coworkers thought it was a great way to make some extra money.  After they were all caught and fired (restitution was made so there were no charges filed) I asked him if at the end of the night they had to do an inventory count (how many hot dogs and hot dog buns were left, and other items) he said yes.  I asked him if he knew why they did that, and he said no.  I explained to him if there were fifty hot dogs in inventory at the end of the night, and the next night there were 25, then his employer would expect to see sales equal to the cost of 25 hot dogs.  If there was only enough money in the till for 20 hot dogs, then the employer would figure out someone was stealing five hot dogs.

That was a bit of a light bulb moment for him.

Some movie theater concession workers are smart enough to get around the inventory. They collect the used popcorn and soda containers from inside theaters, then use those for new transactions. They can pocket that money and the numbers work out fine.

A friend who used to sell tickets at a theater said the way her coworkers stole was to charge adults for a normal ticket but enter a child's ticket into the computer. Almost no one looked at the ticket and realized they had the wrong type, and if they did it was just "Oops, I'm so dumb, let me print you up a new ticket."

I honestly admire the type of intelligence it takes to thwart security rules. I plot that sort of thing myself in idle moments. But I keep it as an intellectual exercise and don't use it for nickel and dime scams. If I ever get a shot at a real score, I might be tempted.

HorseFreak

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4944 on: November 24, 2013, 03:12:15 PM »
My brother worked at a movie theater a long time ago. One of his coworkers got fired for stealing the bills (leaving the change) from the Jimmy Fund collection cans that were passed around at the beginning of the movies. The Jimmy Fund is to support a cancer research and treatment hospital in Boston. He got caught because he bragged about it!

Snooks

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4945 on: November 24, 2013, 04:17:00 PM »
I had a boss at a restaurant who reckoned he could write a book on all the scams he'd seen staff try.  Often they revolved around charging the customer full price then running coupons through the register when they entered the payment.

jedikaiti

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4946 on: November 24, 2013, 05:24:36 PM »
I had a boss at a restaurant who reckoned he could write a book on all the scams he'd seen staff try.  Often they revolved around charging the customer full price then running coupons through the register when they entered the payment.

He should write that book!
"The problem with re-examining your brilliant ideas is that more often than not, you discover they are the intellectual equivalent of saying, 'Hold my beer and watch this!'" - Cindy Couture

Cherry91

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4947 on: November 24, 2013, 05:56:10 PM »
I had a boss at a restaurant who reckoned he could write a book on all the scams he'd seen staff try.  Often they revolved around charging the customer full price then running coupons through the register when they entered the payment.

He should write that book!

I'd read it!

magician5

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4948 on: November 24, 2013, 10:26:25 PM »
My wife worked for a major accounting firm for 25 years. She had many stories about professional staff who would expense charges at strip clubs, prostitutes, so many things that any idiot would know would easily be found out.
There is no 'way to peace.' Peace is the way.

HappilyInsane

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4949 on: November 24, 2013, 11:17:01 PM »
My most recent former coworker decided it would be a neat idea to just do a "no sale" on the register instead of ringing food items up and stick the money off to the side for herself. While standing directly under a security camera pointed directly at said register. She was seriously shocked that she got fired.

I.... what? How does that even...? *Shakes head*

Oh she was quite far on the common sense challenged end of the scale. She interviewed for a clerical job at her college, and when they asked where she saw herself in 5 years, her answer was "Working at Disney." She is 41 with 2 grown kids.