Author Topic: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74  (Read 1289440 times)

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siamesecat2965

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5070 on: December 16, 2013, 10:50:45 AM »
Just got into this with a friend at work. We are closed for Christmas Day, but that is the only day. We work for a big box store. We don't have Boxing Day off. Never have, in all my years of working retail (sometimes it falls on your regular day off, but not often).

Mr. Complainyhead started in about being scheduled for Boxing day (he has Christmas Eve and Christmas Day off) and how he expects massive holiday pay, overtime, and an extra day off for 'working the holiday'. I said the same thing everyone else has said since the dawn of time. "We work retail. We don't get the day off."

"But it is a holiday!!"
"Not for us."
"It's a government holiday! They have to give it to us!!"
"It is a bank holiday. We are not a bank. No, they don't."

We went round and round on this one, and he wouldn't accept the idea that retail do not get perks like multiple days off at Christmas. And he'll complain again when the week comes and he does not get an extra day or extra pay for it, like he complains every dang year.  ::) Ugh.

I hear you. My second, PT job is in retail. So while I'm not a manager or full time, it is expected I work some holidays, and we are open all but three, Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter (although MY store was open on Easter last year, so that may be the norm going forward.

We don't get time and a half for holidays (not required), and the manager is pretty flexible, if you are flexible in return. My mom, my only immediate family, lives 8 hours away. Add to that Christmas Day is the anniversary of my dad's passing, so me NOT spending Christmas with her is simply not an option. that being said, I work whenver she needs me in Dec., and NYD even though I'd prefer not to. So I normally take the week of Christmas, and perhaps a day on either end, depending on what I can do with my FT job, and when the holiday falls.

And if my mom still was local, I still wouldn't work Christmas Eve, as I don't get that day off from my FT job. But there are still those who whine and moan about having to work this day and that day. The most memorable is one CW last year; who bemoaned the fact she had to work the day before Thanksgiving. And was quite put out. Well, we are still open, and if you KNEW you needed to cook, etc. the nyou need to ask for it off. I always do, but beacuse I know i get out early from job #1, and it makes no sense for me to leave at 2, and have to be at work at 5.  But I work every other day I'm needed, including Black Friday, without complaint.

Guess who never has any issues getting my time off requests approved???

cwm

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5071 on: December 16, 2013, 01:05:43 PM »
I wonder if the chef is going to be using that excuse every Christmas for the next 18 years. "But I have a daughter!" Drives me crazy. We have people here who demand the big 3 off because THEY have family. As if the rest of us do not.

Yes, I have to admit, I think that the fault lies more with the chef here. Unless the restaurant closes on Christmas Day, I would expect that *someone* will have to work it, and as SoCalVal says, it's the nature of the industry. If he wants holidays off, he should look at doing office work or something.

The only reason I got Christmas and New Year's off in fast food in college was because the dorms were closed. Store underwent management shift before the holidays one year, and the district manager asked me why I wasn't working Christmas Eve or Christmas Day, it was a mandatory work day. I looked at him and said that if he was willing to open his home to me, I'd be there. Otherwise, as I explained to all the levels of management at the store, the college dorms were closed and I was going to be staying at my parents' home, three hours away. I couldn't afford to pay the $XXX for the days I could stay on, and that still didn't include Christmas Eve or Christmas Day, and there was no way I'd be willing to pay for a hotel room to cover a work shift. It never got brought up again.

The thing is, I don't mind working on days when the store is open, even if it's holidays. Yeah, it sucks. Customers aren't the nicest, it's either dead slow or super busy, but most companies that I've worked for incentivize it. They bring food for Black Friday or Christmas Eve. You get holiday pay as long as you work all your scheduled shifts, which is like an extra full day's work at time and a half pay. Most companies I've been a part of bring in food so people don't have to brave everything else for lunch. But if you're working in an industry where the store will be open, it is completely up to management who's working what shifts. You can have your requests, but that's all it is. End story.

We had a girl get fired from my last job, on the store side, because of her ridiculous requests. She'd say she needed every Wednesday evening and every Sunday off, for church. But then she'd come into the store and shop, talk to customers, spend an hour sitting in the break room talking to coworkers. This happened on a regular basis. The management started scheduling her, because she was already there, just not working. She threw a fit, and the had to institute the policy that if you weren't on the clock, you were shopping. No break room, no going into the back room to say hi to the animals there, just shopping. You were the same as any other customer.

The last straw was when she complained at being scheduled on Black Friday. Didn't they know she had family in town for Thanksgiving? And they didn't drive, so she had to drive them to all the shopping that day, otherwise what was the whole point of the holiday in the first place? Management had the sense to keep her on through Black Friday so we weren't shorthanded, but the next time she was in the break room as a customer, she was gone. If I remember, it was two days later on Sunday.

jedikaiti

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5072 on: December 16, 2013, 02:37:03 PM »
I wonder if the chef is going to be using that excuse every Christmas for the next 18 years. "But I have a daughter!" Drives me crazy. We have people here who demand the big 3 off because THEY have family. As if the rest of us do not.

Yes, I have to admit, I think that the fault lies more with the chef here. Unless the restaurant closes on Christmas Day, I would expect that *someone* will have to work it, and as SoCalVal says, it's the nature of the industry. If he wants holidays off, he should look at doing office work or something.

Actually, I don't. Presumably he's not the only person who can cook there, so why can't someone else take over for the day? He asked for his kid's FIRST Christmas off, not the next 18! Sure, being in the service industry means not getting EVERY holiday off, but it doesn't mean NEVER getting holidays off. There's usually some give-and-take. So he gets Christmas off but has to work on Other Holiday so Other Cook works on Christmas but has Other Holiday off. No big deal. Maybe Chef has to do some extra prep work Christmas Eve to make sure everything's ready to go for Christmas. OK.

Either the pub's nuts for firing him for ASKING for the day off, or there's more backstory, like a history of SS requests.
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

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Twik

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5073 on: December 16, 2013, 03:11:23 PM »
I would think if I were going to take *one* Christmas in my working career to stay home with my daughter, it would be a Christmas she's have a chance of remembering.

Sure, he has a daughter. How many people working there have no family that they would want to spend Christmas with? Being the head chef doesn't mean you can stick your colleagues with the stuff you don't want to do.
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Carotte

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5074 on: December 16, 2013, 03:15:41 PM »
I wonder if the chef is going to be using that excuse every Christmas for the next 18 years. "But I have a daughter!" Drives me crazy. We have people here who demand the big 3 off because THEY have family. As if the rest of us do not.

Yes, I have to admit, I think that the fault lies more with the chef here. Unless the restaurant closes on Christmas Day, I would expect that *someone* will have to work it, and as SoCalVal says, it's the nature of the industry. If he wants holidays off, he should look at doing office work or something.

Actually, I don't. Presumably he's not the only person who can cook there, so why can't someone else take over for the day? He asked for his kid's FIRST Christmas off, not the next 18! Sure, being in the service industry means not getting EVERY holiday off, but it doesn't mean NEVER getting holidays off. There's usually some give-and-take. So he gets Christmas off but has to work on Other Holiday so Other Cook works on Christmas but has Other Holiday off. No big deal. Maybe Chef has to do some extra prep work Christmas Eve to make sure everything's ready to go for Christmas. OK.

Either the pub's nuts for firing him for ASKING for the day off, or there's more backstory, like a history of SS requests.

I also think there's a backstory missing without which I can't make a true decision about the matter.
Maybe the chef has been working every Holiday for the last ten years, always getting short changed or willingly taking the shifts so that colleagues who already have a family could spend it with them. Maybe he has to pull more than his weight, has had to make concessions thinking that his boss held him in more esteem and it could one day be redeemed (like asking for one day off now and again.)

There must be more than one chef or at least more than one person that can cook, maybe chef N2 is a lazy one, or has less seniority, or is a family-less Jewish immigrant so chef n1 feels it's really unfair that he's the one who has to give up Christmas...

And then again maybe chef N1 is the lazy one always asking and getting off time and benefits while others have to work his load.

The situations are really too different and would always color ones answer to the problem.

Iris

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5075 on: December 16, 2013, 03:29:55 PM »
I wonder if the chef is going to be using that excuse every Christmas for the next 18 years. "But I have a daughter!" Drives me crazy. We have people here who demand the big 3 off because THEY have family. As if the rest of us do not.

Yes, I have to admit, I think that the fault lies more with the chef here. Unless the restaurant closes on Christmas Day, I would expect that *someone* will have to work it, and as SoCalVal says, it's the nature of the industry. If he wants holidays off, he should look at doing office work or something.

Actually, I don't. Presumably he's not the only person who can cook there, so why can't someone else take over for the day? He asked for his kid's FIRST Christmas off, not the next 18! Sure, being in the service industry means not getting EVERY holiday off, but it doesn't mean NEVER getting holidays off. There's usually some give-and-take. So he gets Christmas off but has to work on Other Holiday so Other Cook works on Christmas but has Other Holiday off. No big deal. Maybe Chef has to do some extra prep work Christmas Eve to make sure everything's ready to go for Christmas. OK.

Either the pub's nuts for firing him for ASKING for the day off, or there's more backstory, like a history of SS requests.


This. DH works in an industry that runs literally all the time. So obviously someone (a bunch of someones actually) has to be at work on any given holiday. However it would not be considered out of line for someone with a new baby to ask a fellow employee to swap shifts so they could be with the child at Christmas. If the person didn't want to swap they'd just say no, end of story, no hard feelings. I find the idea that the chef is being judged as a special snowflake for asking one thing on one occasion bizarre.

Then again, I also find the idea that he would be sacked for asking one thing on one occasion bizarre, so I'm sure there is more to this story than meets the eye.
"Can't do anything with children, can you?" the woman said.

Poirot thought you could, but forebore to say so.

jedikaiti

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5076 on: December 16, 2013, 03:30:41 PM »
Exactly, Carotte. The only absolute PD here was hijacking the pub's Twitter feed. Not a classy move, nor one to get him any bonus points with possible future employers.
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

"The problem with re-examining your brilliant ideas is that more often than not, you discover they are the intellectual equivalent of saying, 'Hold my beer and watch this!'" - Cindy Couture

wheeitsme

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5077 on: December 16, 2013, 04:12:42 PM »
Exactly, Carotte. The only absolute PD here was hijacking the pub's Twitter feed. Not a classy move, nor one to get him any bonus points with possible future employers.

Well, he didn't actually hack it.  He created the original feed with the permission of his former employers.

Midnight Kitty

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5078 on: December 16, 2013, 04:34:08 PM »
I used to have a coworker who stated she needed to have weekends off because she spent every Sunday doing work for the church
I currently have a coworker who does her Church work during work hours on her work computer, printing several copies for her Sunday School class.

I don't know why she's still here.  Maybe when we get a new office manager she will have to improve or move.  The current office manager is retiring so she doesn't have to work with Ms. PD-Wannabee anymore.
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ladyknight1

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5079 on: December 16, 2013, 04:47:38 PM »
I used to have a coworker who stated she needed to have weekends off because she spent every Sunday doing work for the church
I currently have a coworker who does her Church work during work hours on her work computer, printing several copies for her Sunday School class.

I don't know why she's still here.  Maybe when we get a new office manager she will have to improve or move.  The current office manager is retiring so she doesn't have to work with Ms. PD-Wannabee anymore.

I have a co-worker that spends 8-10 work hours per week doing home owner association stuff, and no, that isn't work related.

jedikaiti

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5080 on: December 16, 2013, 05:20:01 PM »
Exactly, Carotte. The only absolute PD here was hijacking the pub's Twitter feed. Not a classy move, nor one to get him any bonus points with possible future employers.

Well, he didn't actually hack it.  He created the original feed with the permission of his former employers.

Yes, but for the express purpose of promoting their business. So there was no actual hacking, just hijacking. Once he was let go, he should have had no further interaction with that account. They really should have made sure they had the PW, and changed it when he was let go, though. But that's beside the point.

When you create a social media account for your employer, it is THEIR social media account, not yours. Kinda like drafting a report or something. Once you're not their employee, or your job duties change so that you no longer run that account on their behalf, the account is theirs to handle as they see fit. Not for you to use to air grievances when you part ways with the employer.
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

"The problem with re-examining your brilliant ideas is that more often than not, you discover they are the intellectual equivalent of saying, 'Hold my beer and watch this!'" - Cindy Couture

ladyknight1

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5081 on: December 16, 2013, 06:18:07 PM »
Yes, the university has guidelines that explain that. I imagine it is quite different for a small company.

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5082 on: December 16, 2013, 10:59:00 PM »
What should you do if a coworker is stealing something from the communal fridge? Poison them.

http://www.news.com.au/finance/business/man-poisons-coworker-for-stealing-drink-bottle/story-fn5lic6c-1226784647470

mbbored

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5083 on: December 17, 2013, 01:33:56 AM »
In regards to the chef, I'm fully with the restaurant. My brother is a chef and his girlfriend is a waitress at a brewpub. Fortunately their restaurant is closed on Christmas Day, but every year to ensure they can get the night of Christmas Eve off in order to make the 5 hour drive to my mother's home, they volunteer to work every weekend in December, Christmas Eve lunch shift and New Year's Eve. Where they work, the whole month of December is busy, thanks to shoppers (they work in a historic downtown area) and holiday parties. To ask for Christmas and a weekend off in December would be inconceivable to them. Also, just because somebody has a child, doesn't mean they automatically get Christmas off.

SoCalVal

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5084 on: December 17, 2013, 02:46:36 AM »
I know this'll sound like a crazy exaggeration, but, in my area of my dept alone (which is in a hospital so my area is 24/7 to support inpatient care), we've had 10-15 babies born just this year (I started counting a moment ago because I figured 10 was an exaggeration but stopped when I realized it's over 10).  There is no way every single one of these employees may have Christmas off this year in order to celebrate their child's first Christmas (never mind that everyone works on a holiday rotation).  Also, they all knew, coming to work in the inpatient area of the department, that they would have to work the major holidays since the area is 24/7.