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Author Topic: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74  (Read 3699756 times)

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Nikko-chan

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5700 on: May 19, 2014, 07:15:24 PM »
ow ow ow. I facepalmed so hard I gave myself a headache.

BeautifulDisaster

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5701 on: May 19, 2014, 10:25:39 PM »
I'm in the midst of a five week training course for a new job. During the training you have to pass three tests with an average score of 80%. One person spends the entire class time doing everything she can to try and keep everyone's attention on her, playing with her phone, chewing on ice loudly, popping bubble gum, etc, etc.

The entire class has gotten SO annoyed by her behavior (because it's distracting and affecting our learning) that we've started calling her out on it.

We've taken two tests and at this point she's going to have to get a 100 on the last one to make it through the end of the class and keep her job.

Even if she does manage to pass the last test with a perfect score, I can't imagine she'll be able to perform the functions of the job, as each person is required to work independently and she's far too attention seeking for that. It'll be interesting to see what happens after our last test. 

VorFemme

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5702 on: May 20, 2014, 05:47:16 PM »
I'm in the midst of a five week training course for a new job. During the training you have to pass three tests with an average score of 80%. One person spends the entire class time doing everything she can to try and keep everyone's attention on her, playing with her phone, chewing on ice loudly, popping bubble gum, etc, etc.

The entire class has gotten SO annoyed by her behavior (because it's distracting and affecting our learning) that we've started calling her out on it.

We've taken two tests and at this point she's going to have to get a 100 on the last one to make it through the end of the class and keep her job.

Even if she does manage to pass the last test with a perfect score, I can't imagine she'll be able to perform the functions of the job, as each person is required to work independently and she's far too attention seeking for that. It'll be interesting to see what happens after our last test. 

I ran into her cousin in 2000.  She kept telling us that she was a genius, graduated college at 19, and so forth & so on...she set up a Cool Girls Clique with half the women in the training class...and got walked out of the building by security when her phone records of calls made did not match (no overlap at all, I heard) the records of calls she was supposed to document on her work files over several weeks.  One of "her" clients called in & asked WHY he had never heard from her and was told that he HAD talked to her on several days (documented in computer notes that could NOT be edited after they were saved. 

His comments led to the audit...

It was interesting, in a rather odd way.  I kept waiting to hear what her next claim to fame would be and watched the two women in her clique fawn over her.

It was a Jane Goodall observation practice session - because some of her stunts really were odd...
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I explain?

Hillia

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5703 on: May 21, 2014, 09:45:13 AM »
DS just told me about one at his workplace.

The company DS works for has locations in several states, and about 10-12 key people in the company travel frequently between these locations.  In addition, the manager at each location has a company American Express card with a pretty high limit, because it is not uncommon for them to need expensive supplies on fairly short notice to provide services.

The company has a new comptroller, about 3 months in to the position.  Yesterday he irritated quite a number of managers by lecturing everyone in a meeting about sloppy expense report procedures, and talked about implementing new procedures which would bring a lot of delay and frustration to managers without increasing accountability or efficiency in the financial area.

Yesterday evening, DS was called to the hotel where one of the out of town managers was staying; her company AmEx was being declined.  He tried to use his card with the same result. They called the company owner; same thing.  It turns out that the new 'law and order' comptroller has not paid the AmEx bill, so every single card the company has has been frozen.

Not only that, but during the course of discussions with the hotel about getting the traveling employee's room paid for, they found that the comptroller has also  not been reviewing bills; the hotel has not been giving a previously-negotiated business rate on hotel stays for at least the past month.

Looks like the 'new' comptroller will be the 'former' comptroller pretty soon.

Morty'sCleaningLady

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5704 on: May 21, 2014, 04:11:59 PM »
Boss asked me to pour through a pile of resumes for a specific talent that he forgot to put on the job description.  So, I'm going through every single resume received to find this magical elixir (that isn't going to be there).

Best PD resume was for 'Walter Washington'.  His application was fine and the cover letter existed.  However, there was a typo on his resume.  A glaring typo.  In 22 font.  He misspelled his name!  "Walter Wahsintogn'  So much for that attention to detail mentioned in the cover letter...
Formerly Mrs.Bart

iridaceae

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5705 on: May 22, 2014, 03:17:32 AM »
Hilliard we have a regular who was checking out one morning after a week-long stay and we were chatting (she's very nice) and I had to tell her her credit card was declining. Extremely surprised,  she called her company- it was a company credit card. Apparently the company's credit card information had been compromised and the company had cancelled all corporate cards 3 days previously. How nice of them not to tell her.  ::) She paid with her own but still- how embarrassing and it makes whoever at corporate look bad for not passing the information along.
Nothing to see here.

Free Range Hippy Chick

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5706 on: May 22, 2014, 04:54:20 AM »
It's fairly well known that a common consequence of brain trauma - stroke, injury, surgery - is difficulty with speech and language. Patients can struggle to remember words, or use the wrong words, etc. There are tests to help establish whether this has happened, and to what extent.

At least one hospital in the UK is using a test designed in the US. Now I'm sure it's a perfectly satisfactory test - in the US. But 'two nations divided by a common language'?

What do you call the room under the house which contains the boiler and the laundry?

British houses don't in general have basements. I've never lived in a house with a basement. In the UK your washing machine is in your kitchen, or in the utility room off the kitchen, or in the garage.

What do you call the coin worth ten cents?

I call it foreign currency. Pounds sterling, remember?

What do you call pants made of denim with pockets?

I call them extremely unlikely. Pants are underwear, they don't have pockets and they aren't made of denim. If you mean jeans, they aren't pants, they're trousers. 

As I say, I'm sure it's a valid test - in the US. Under normal circumstances, I'm sure too that most UK patients would know the answers to the questions. But after a serious brain trauma? That's just setting them up to fail. Is it really beyond the capability of the department to go through the questions ahead of time, and adjust them to British vocabulary? Is it really beyond the wit of the therapist to edit the questions on the fly?

So far, it's just bad clinical practice. Where it becomes professional Darwinism... If you are going to do something this stupid with a patient who is still seriously ill, and whose family members are still seriously stressed, it is probably a bad idea to do it with the patient whose spouse is a psychologist, and who specialises in the psychology of communication. 

kherbert05

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5707 on: May 22, 2014, 05:22:45 AM »
It's fairly well known that a common consequence of brain trauma - stroke, injury, surgery - is difficulty with speech and language. Patients can struggle to remember words, or use the wrong words, etc. There are tests to help establish whether this has happened, and to what extent.

At least one hospital in the UK is using a test designed in the US. Now I'm sure it's a perfectly satisfactory test - in the US. But 'two nations divided by a common language'?

What do you call the room under the house which contains the boiler and the laundry?

British houses don't in general have basements. I've never lived in a house with a basement. In the UK your washing machine is in your kitchen, or in the utility room off the kitchen, or in the garage.

What do you call the coin worth ten cents?

I call it foreign currency. Pounds sterling, remember?

What do you call pants made of denim with pockets?

I call them extremely unlikely. Pants are underwear, they don't have pockets and they aren't made of denim. If you mean jeans, they aren't pants, they're trousers. 

As I say, I'm sure it's a valid test - in the US. Under normal circumstances, I'm sure too that most UK patients would know the answers to the questions. But after a serious brain trauma? That's just setting them up to fail. Is it really beyond the capability of the department to go through the questions ahead of time, and adjust them to British vocabulary? Is it really beyond the wit of the therapist to edit the questions on the fly?

So far, it's just bad clinical practice. Where it becomes professional Darwinism... If you are going to do something this stupid with a patient who is still seriously ill, and whose family members are still seriously stressed, it is probably a bad idea to do it with the patient whose spouse is a psychologist, and who specialises in the psychology of communication. 
Actually those questions are not just US specific - they are specific to certain regions of the US. My 2nd graders wouldn't know what a basement is you don't build basements in old swamp land. I have family members that live in older areas of Houston in house up on cement blocks with craw spaces underneath.

I remember describing my Nana's (in Canada) unfinished basement in a house that dated back to the late 1800 - early 1900. IT was dirt and rock not cement. The teacher thought I was confused,  until Mom told her it was true. The teacher's only exposure to basements was from Movies and TV shows.
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

gramma dishes

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5708 on: May 22, 2014, 08:51:28 AM »


...   I remember describing my Nana's (in Canada) unfinished basement in a house that dated back to the late 1800 - early 1900. IT was dirt and rock not cement. The teacher thought I was confused,  until Mom told her it was true. The teacher's only exposure to basements was from Movies and TV shows.

One of my Grandmothers had one like that too.  But they didn't even call it a basement.  They called it a "root cellar".

Ms_Cellany

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5709 on: May 22, 2014, 08:53:13 AM »
A friend of mine, a newspaper reporter, had to have surgery to remove a benign tumor from his auditory nerve in late 2000 (the timing here is important). To get to the tumor, surgeons had to literally lift up his brain. So although it technically wasn't brain surgery, they had to check his brain function after.

"What's your name?" [Name]
"Do you know where you are?" [Hospital name]
"What day is it?" "Wednesday"
"Who's President?" "I don't know, and neither do you."

The medical team cracked up. It was the disputed period after the Bush-Gore election debacle.
Bingle bongle dingle dangle yickity-do yickity-dah ping-pong lippy-toppy too tah.

siamesecat2965

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5710 on: May 22, 2014, 09:15:20 AM »
A friend of mine, a newspaper reporter, had to have surgery to remove a benign tumor from his auditory nerve in late 2000 (the timing here is important). To get to the tumor, surgeons had to literally lift up his brain. So although it technically wasn't brain surgery, they had to check his brain function after.

"What's your name?" [Name]
"Do you know where you are?" [Hospital name]
"What day is it?" "Wednesday"
"Who's President?" "I don't know, and neither do you."

The medical team cracked up. It was the disputed period after the Bush-Gore election debacle.

the last one reminds me of my grandmother, when, at age 97, she had to go into a nursing home. They asked her certain questions, to test her mental status. Things such as her name, how old was she, where is she, which she passed with flying colors. Then they got to "who is president?" Her response: "Bill Clinton, but I don't have much use for him, Hillary either" Apparently she cracked up the entire staff!

Free Range Hippy Chick

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5711 on: May 22, 2014, 09:23:52 AM »
This is going to run and run. They had a second test asking for the name of the school for grades 9 through 12. Well, we don't call them grades. We call them forms or years and I don't know if ours are numbered the same way as the American ones. Most of our children leave primary school - you don't call it that, do you? - aged 11 and go to secondary school until they're 16. In some areas they leave primary school at 8 and go to middle school until they're 14. Also, we don't say '9 through 12'. We sat 'from 9 to 12' or 'between 9 and 12'.

They've asked for a seafood kept in big tanks of seawater at the store. We don't call them stores, they're shops, and I have never in my life seen a seawater tank (or a freshwater tank, come to that) in one.

They asked for the person who takes your bags to the car. Oh, I know this one! That's a mugger! Sorry, people, but British shops don't carry things to your car for you.

What do you call the season that comes after fall? We don't have a season called fall.

I think that when the complaint goes to the hospital, I shall be selling tickets. There won't be popcorn because I don't like it, but feel free to bring your own.

wolfie

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5712 on: May 22, 2014, 09:33:07 AM »
This is going to run and run. They had a second test asking for the name of the school for grades 9 through 12. Well, we don't call them grades. We call them forms or years and I don't know if ours are numbered the same way as the American ones. Most of our children leave primary school - you don't call it that, do you? - aged 11 and go to secondary school until they're 16. In some areas they leave primary school at 8 and go to middle school until they're 14. Also, we don't say '9 through 12'. We sat 'from 9 to 12' or 'between 9 and 12'.

They've asked for a seafood kept in big tanks of seawater at the store. We don't call them stores, they're shops, and I have never in my life seen a seawater tank (or a freshwater tank, come to that) in one.

They asked for the person who takes your bags to the car. Oh, I know this one! That's a mugger! Sorry, people, but British shops don't carry things to your car for you.

What do you call the season that comes after fall? We don't have a season called fall.

I think that when the complaint goes to the hospital, I shall be selling tickets. There won't be popcorn because I don't like it, but feel free to bring your own.

it's interesting reading this and trying to figure out the answers. The first one is tough because it also depends on the area. I think the answer they are looking for is High School.  In my area we called it gradeschool, junior high and then High school. I think some places call it elementary instead of grade and I know there is a middleschool but I have no idea what grades it refers to.


Second one has to be lobster - do they not sell live lobster where you are? Or you would have to go to a specialty store for that?

Can the person administering the test answer those questions correctly?

kherbert05

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5713 on: May 22, 2014, 09:48:12 AM »
This is going to run and run. They had a second test asking for the name of the school for grades 9 through 12. Well, we don't call them grades. We call them forms or years and I don't know if ours are numbered the same way as the American ones. Most of our children leave primary school - you don't call it that, do you? - aged 11 and go to secondary school until they're 16. In some areas they leave primary school at 8 and go to middle school until they're 14. Also, we don't say '9 through 12'. We sat 'from 9 to 12' or 'between 9 and 12'.

They've asked for a seafood kept in big tanks of seawater at the store. We don't call them stores, they're shops, and I have never in my life seen a seawater tank (or a freshwater tank, come to that) in one.

They asked for the person who takes your bags to the car. Oh, I know this one! That's a mugger! Sorry, people, but British shops don't carry things to your car for you.

What do you call the season that comes after fall? We don't have a season called fall.

I think that when the complaint goes to the hospital, I shall be selling tickets. There won't be popcorn because I don't like it, but feel free to bring your own.

it's interesting reading this and trying to figure out the answers. The first one is tough because it also depends on the area. I think the answer they are looking for is High School.  In my area we called it gradeschool, junior high and then High school. I think some places call it elementary instead of grade and I know there is a middleschool but I have no idea what grades it refers to.


Second one has to be lobster - do they not sell live lobster where you are? Or you would have to go to a specialty store for that?

Can the person administering the test answer those questions correctly?
Junior high is 7-8 here
Middle is 6 th

Some districts have primary k-2
Intermediate  3-5
Middle 6,
Jh 7-8
Hs 9-12

In San Angelo 2feeder
Patterns
Central hs
Elementary k-6
Jh 7-9
Hs 10-12

Lake view
Elem k-5
Jh 6-8
Hs 9-12

When I was student teaching a girl transferred to central feeder pattern her family threw fits about her being demoted back to elementary
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

Free Range Hippy Chick

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5714 on: May 22, 2014, 09:49:44 AM »

Second one has to be lobster - do they not sell live lobster where you are? Or you would have to go to a specialty store for that?

Can the person administering the test answer those questions correctly?

Live lobster - yes, I could have guessed lobster, but then I haven't had brain surgery - isn't generally available other than at the coast where you could actually buy it at the pierhead. A few years ago there was a very funny article in one of the weekend newspapers about Top Chef recipe books and how the recipes in them aren't something that the average household cook could do, and the starter was lobster ravioli that required a live lobster. The reviewer, living in one of the largest cities in the UK, couldn't find anywhere to sell her a live lobster. I would have no idea of where to go for one. I think that anywhere large enough to have a permanent fish market - London or Birmingham, maybe Manchester - could produce one, but the average supermarket? No.

I gather there was nearly blood spilled over the pronouncement that 'this picture shows men are playing soccer and wearing shorts. What season is it? Must be summer'. Um, no. The football - not soccer - season starts on 1st August and runs until the second week in May, and professional football players wear shorts all through the season - so men in shorts playing football could be any season.

I expect the questioner can answer the questions - as I say, I could answer most of them - but since the point of asking is to establish that the patient's own natural vocabulary is complete and available, the test really is an Epic Fail, and tempers are being lost on a truly awesome scale.