Author Topic: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74  (Read 1383273 times)

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MariaE

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5940 on: June 30, 2014, 06:41:57 AM »
If you've already tried to get a day off and were told no, don't promptly call in sick for that day.   The bosses aren't stupid.
And if you do call in sick don't come back to work with brand new out-of-state license plates on your car.  Local law says you have to get local plates when you move.  Someone will turn you in.  My co-worker committed both Professional Darwinism and Personal Darwinism.   

She was eventually fired, but not over this issue.

Not sure how this is personal Darwinism? Wouldn't that require somebody dying?
 
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Margo

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5941 on: June 30, 2014, 09:51:22 AM »
<snip>

3.  He started out earning 4 hours of annual leave per 2 weeks, which equals 13 days of annual per year.  Jason put in for all this vacation time at the beginning of the summer.  The region manager had to redo everything once she realized that he did not yet qualify for all the time he asked for.  "But I get 13 days a year," he said.  Yes, and at the end of the year that is how it will add up, but you actually have to earn it first.  It's kind of like writing checks for money that you will be depositing 6 months later.


This one doesn't seem as bad as the rest, to me. In my experience, it's not uncommon to be able to take leave before you have accrued it , in any given year - if you were to leave/be fired you would potentially have to pay back the 'over drawn' days, or would have the appropriate amount deducted from your final pay slip.  As an example, our holiday year runs from 1st January, but becaue Jan. 2nd  is on Friday next year, a lot of people in our office have already booked that day off (1st is a bank holiday here so we will be closed anyway) so they don't have to come in until Monday.
It sounds as though Jason has plenty of other PD issues, and I can see that it could be PD if he argues with his manager about what he was entitled to.

ladyknight1

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5942 on: June 30, 2014, 09:57:31 AM »
I've never worked anywhere where employees could take more leave than what they had accrued at that point.

Ms_Cellany

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5943 on: June 30, 2014, 09:59:19 AM »
I've never worked anywhere where employees could take more leave than what they had accrued at that point.

I had a new co-worker who had scheduled a trip for a friend's wedding, then got hired with us about six weeks before the wedding. She told them about this obligation before she was hired, and got the time off.
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Goosey

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5944 on: June 30, 2014, 10:09:01 AM »
You can where I work. You can go 40 hrs "in the hole". But, that means you don't accrue any leave until you've made up the leave you took AND if you quit before making up the time for the leave, the company can come after you for money.

ladyknight1

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5945 on: June 30, 2014, 10:09:36 AM »
I have experienced that ^ and with someone transferring internally that had time off, so used it and someone who took their honeymoon the week after being hired and took it as unpaid leave.

Margo

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5946 on: June 30, 2014, 10:30:30 AM »
I don't think I've ever worked anyway where you can't use your allowance as soon as you start work, although it's not uncommon for firms to have a 'no holiday requests during your probationary period' rule.

It may be that this is something where there is a strong regional difference -  I'm in the UK, and although I have heard of situations where you can' take any leave until you've accrued it, I don't think it is very common here.

hjaye

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5947 on: June 30, 2014, 10:52:30 AM »
If you've already tried to get a day off and were told no, don't promptly call in sick for that day.   The bosses aren't stupid.

I used to work for an Armored Car company.  There was one guard who would consistently call in sick before a long holiday weekend.
Everyone knew he did it, but management never called him on it. 
December 24th 1981 he called in sick, another guard who didnít normally drive routes was taken away from his regular duties  in the terminal and sent to run the route for the guard who called  in.  The replacement guard was shot and killed picking a deposit from a K-Mart.
The replacement guard was a very nice guy, very popular and a hard worker.  No one wanted to work with the guard who called in sick all the time.  I donít think he was fired, but he was gone shortly therafter.  Itís kind of hard to continue working with almost 100 coworkers who think youíre lowest piece  of slime to ever crawl on this earth.

Shalamar

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5948 on: June 30, 2014, 01:05:36 PM »
When my husband and I were newspaper carriers a few years ago, and we'd gone to the paper pick-up place on the Friday before a long weekend, the (very) harassed looking manager asked if we could possibly pick up a couple of extra routes.  Seems that several carriers had "called in sick" that morning.  The fact that the weather,  originally predicted to be awful, had unexpectedly turned out to be gorgeous couldn't possibly have had anything to do with that ...

(Alas, we had to say no.  We each had a route, plus a regular 9-5 job to get to.  I felt very sorry for the manager that day.)

Visiting Crazy Town

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5949 on: June 30, 2014, 01:34:16 PM »
If you've already tried to get a day off and were told no, don't promptly call in sick for that day.   The bosses aren't stupid.

I used to work for an Armored Car company.  There was one guard who would consistently call in sick before a long holiday weekend.
Everyone knew he did it, but management never called him on it. 
December 24th 1981 he called in sick, another guard who didnít normally drive routes was taken away from his regular duties  in the terminal and sent to run the route for the guard who called  in.  The replacement guard was shot and killed picking a deposit from a K-Mart.
The replacement guard was a very nice guy, very popular and a hard worker.  No one wanted to work with the guard who called in sick all the time.  I donít think he was fired, but he was gone shortly therafter. Itís kind of hard to continue working with almost 100 coworkers who think youíre lowest piece  of slime to ever crawl on this earth.

to be quite honest it was not his fault that  the replacement guard was shot and killed unless h planned the robbery.  I guess he works with some pretty awful people if they  are sitting there thinking that  it would have been better if he was shot and killed ranther than the other person.  I would think that  they  shouldn't have blamed him at all.

Carotte

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5950 on: June 30, 2014, 01:38:03 PM »
I hope they won't think I'm a PD in making but I'm in the middle of a situation where there was misscommunication on their part and lack of attention on mine and I so I get to request 2 day off (or 2 day changed) on a 5 week contract  :-\.

To make it short:
They called me in for 1 week, the last week of June, I said ok.

They knew that from July 1 to July 8 I wasn't available ( on paper, by mail and reiterated by phone - it's really just the 4/5th but that's what I had given them).

I go and sign my contract, I was pressed for time (their fault*) and didn't notice that it was now a 5 week contract, I only noticed when I could finally get it back signed by them on my first day of work (that's their fault too*).

I'm scheduled to work on the 4th and 5th, the two days I absolutely have to have off (and again, they knew this).

I notified my superior who said she was going to talk to HR. I don't want to leave my coworkers in a lurch, specially because Saturday is a busy day, but it's for a wedding in the family, already confirmed, train booked and all.  :(

I made an error in not checking my contract (the dates were similar when you glance over: 28 June/26 July.)
It's not like I was expecting them not to know how to do things like using the right dates or actually telling me it was now 5 weeks and not one!
So I guess the HR intern (I was told she's an intern) is the one who messed the most on this one...

*no really, I was to sign at 9.30am, the contract wasn't actually written yet, I start the training day at 10am, am asked to sign it during my lunch break but before the secretary's lunch (short window), I have to run to meet my training group back and the training day finishes way after the HR office closes. When I sign it at 12 or so the HR head honcho had not signed it yet so I can't take my contract home with me. They told me to come and get it on my first day.

HoneyBee42

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5951 on: June 30, 2014, 01:43:32 PM »
If you've already tried to get a day off and were told no, don't promptly call in sick for that day.   The bosses aren't stupid.

I used to work for an Armored Car company.  There was one guard who would consistently call in sick before a long holiday weekend.
Everyone knew he did it, but management never called him on it. 
December 24th 1981 he called in sick, another guard who didnít normally drive routes was taken away from his regular duties  in the terminal and sent to run the route for the guard who called  in.  The replacement guard was shot and killed picking a deposit from a K-Mart.
The replacement guard was a very nice guy, very popular and a hard worker.  No one wanted to work with the guard who called in sick all the time.  I donít think he was fired, but he was gone shortly therafter. Itís kind of hard to continue working with almost 100 coworkers who think youíre lowest piece  of slime to ever crawl on this earth.

to be quite honest it was not his fault that  the replacement guard was shot and killed unless h planned the robbery.  I guess he works with some pretty awful people if they  are sitting there thinking that  it would have been better if he was shot and killed ranther than the other person.  I would think that  they  shouldn't have blamed him at all.
OTOH, the replacement guard usually worked in the terminal and not on routes, and someone who is more accustomed to working routes might have been more likely to see something hinky that someone who doesn't normally do that particular task wouldn't know is abnormal.


jedikaiti

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5952 on: June 30, 2014, 01:46:51 PM »
If you've already tried to get a day off and were told no, don't promptly call in sick for that day.   The bosses aren't stupid.

I used to work for an Armored Car company.  There was one guard who would consistently call in sick before a long holiday weekend.
Everyone knew he did it, but management never called him on it. 
December 24th 1981 he called in sick, another guard who didnít normally drive routes was taken away from his regular duties  in the terminal and sent to run the route for the guard who called  in.  The replacement guard was shot and killed picking a deposit from a K-Mart.
The replacement guard was a very nice guy, very popular and a hard worker.  No one wanted to work with the guard who called in sick all the time.  I donít think he was fired, but he was gone shortly therafter. Itís kind of hard to continue working with almost 100 coworkers who think youíre lowest piece  of slime to ever crawl on this earth.

to be quite honest it was not his fault that  the replacement guard was shot and killed unless h planned the robbery.  I guess he works with some pretty awful people if they  are sitting there thinking that  it would have been better if he was shot and killed ranther than the other person.  I would think that  they  shouldn't have blamed him at all.

No, but the fact that he routinely did that (earning him a reputation as a slacker), and the fact that because he had done so yet again meant that someone who was well-liked and known for their work ethic (not to mention not usually out on routes) had to go out in his place that day... And what HoneyBee42 said - someone who's used to working out on the routes might not have met the same fate as someone not accustomed to it. I'm sure the company wouldn't have sent someone out totally unprepared, but there's a big difference between having the training and having the experience to back up the training.

I think my opinion of him would have been diminished, and if my opinion of him were already low, well, it might not be a long drop to "lowest piece of slime."

With that history of calling in, though, I am surprised he still had a job to call in to for so long.
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jedikaiti

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5953 on: June 30, 2014, 01:48:44 PM »
If you've already tried to get a day off and were told no, don't promptly call in sick for that day.   The bosses aren't stupid.
And if you do call in sick don't come back to work with brand new out-of-state license plates on your car.  Local law says you have to get local plates when you move.  Someone will turn you in.  My co-worker committed both Professional Darwinism and Personal Darwinism.   

She was eventually fired, but not over this issue.

Not sure how this is personal Darwinism? Wouldn't that require somebody dying?

I suppose it could be more like social or legal Darwinism, rather than more literal personal Darwinism...
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

"The problem with re-examining your brilliant ideas is that more often than not, you discover they are the intellectual equivalent of saying, 'Hold my beer and watch this!'" - Cindy Couture

SoCalVal

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5954 on: June 30, 2014, 03:36:04 PM »
I've never worked anywhere where employees could take more leave than what they had accrued at that point.

I used to work for a company where one major part of it handles federal contracts.  During the US holiday season, I believe that part of the government staff goes on hiatus for two weeks in December.  Therefore, that entire part of the company goes on vacation for two weeks.  If you don't have enough time accrued, it's the one time of year they pay you anyway but then you can't take any vacation time until the time has been "paid back."  I was a temp there so, blessedly, I got my current job before we hit that time of year (I would've gone two weeks with zero income).

At my University, probation is six months so zero vacation leave may be used during that time.  However, you may take unpaid time off (or use CTO -- essentially, overtime banked so it becomes compensatory time off).