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Author Topic: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74  (Read 3436135 times)

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perpetua

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #6090 on: August 02, 2014, 01:14:31 PM »
I think the issue is more with the message of "Guess what?  You're having a bunch more work dumped on you that will call for unpaid overtime!  Aren't you thrilled?" and not so much the "Cheers."

Yes that's it.  The cheers is not the problem.  The rest of the message is

Ok, then I guess I don't understand the "she wrote "cheers"? Who does that?" comment if the cheers isn't the problem. It's a very common way of signing off an email.

AtraBecca

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #6091 on: August 02, 2014, 01:21:24 PM »
I think the issue is more with the message of "Guess what?  You're having a bunch more work dumped on you that will call for unpaid overtime!  Aren't you thrilled?" and not so much the "Cheers."

Yes that's it.  The cheers is not the problem.  The rest of the message is

Ok, then I guess I don't understand the "she wrote "cheers"? Who does that?" comment if the cheers isn't the problem. It's a very common way of signing off an email.

Yes, but saying something so cheerful after something so terrible is just rubbing salt in the wound.

perpetua

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #6092 on: August 02, 2014, 01:43:26 PM »
I think the issue is more with the message of "Guess what?  You're having a bunch more work dumped on you that will call for unpaid overtime!  Aren't you thrilled?" and not so much the "Cheers."

Yes that's it.  The cheers is not the problem.  The rest of the message is

Ok, then I guess I don't understand the "she wrote "cheers"? Who does that?" comment if the cheers isn't the problem. It's a very common way of signing off an email.

Yes, but saying something so cheerful after something so terrible is just rubbing salt in the wound.

Ah, ok, that's the disconnect then. I don't necessarily see it as something deliberately cheerful, since it's such a common way of signing off a mail where I am.

Reika

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #6093 on: August 02, 2014, 03:17:17 PM »
Sounds like a former supervisor I had back in my first call center position. She was eventually let go and ended up working in a prison as a guard, which suited her personality just fine.

She traumatized me so badly that any time a current supervisor wanted to talk to me, even if it was something good, I'd turn into a nervous wreck.

Jocelyn

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #6094 on: August 02, 2014, 06:44:39 PM »
I think the issue is more with the message of "Guess what?  You're having a bunch more work dumped on you that will call for unpaid overtime!  Aren't you thrilled?" and not so much the "Cheers."

Yes that's it.  The cheers is not the problem.  The rest of the message is

Ok, then I guess I don't understand the "she wrote "cheers"? Who does that?" comment if the cheers isn't the problem. It's a very common way of signing off an email.
I think the poster meant 'she wrote 'cheers' (when giving someone bad news)?'

Saying 'cheers' to someone as you give them unwelcome news is definitely inappropriate. If she'd included the bit about them permanently getting out of the unwanted chore, then it would have been OK.

nutraxfornerves

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #6095 on: August 02, 2014, 07:05:35 PM »
This may be a cultural issue. "Cheers" would be an unusual closing to an email in a US business setting, or a personal email for that matter.

Nutrax
The plural of anecdote is not data

PastryGoddess

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #6096 on: August 02, 2014, 07:17:02 PM »
This may be a cultural issue. "Cheers" would be an unusual closing to an email in a US business setting, or a personal email for that matter.

No I don't think so.  I've used cheers in business communication among my team.  But it's typically paired with upbeat and happy news.

Psychopoesie

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #6097 on: August 02, 2014, 08:16:03 PM »
Cheers is a fairly generic email sign off here. See it as often as best or regards. Not attached to specifically happy news.

Made me remember a funny article about email sign offs. Warning - some swear words used.

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/jul/17/email-sign-off-etiquette

nutraxfornerves

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #6098 on: August 02, 2014, 08:17:09 PM »
Interesting. I have never seen "cheers" in an email form anyone in the US. Only Australia and occasionally, the UK.

Nutrax
The plural of anecdote is not data

perpetua

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #6099 on: August 02, 2014, 09:27:37 PM »
This may be a cultural issue. "Cheers" would be an unusual closing to an email in a US business setting, or a personal email for that matter.

Well yes - Ceallach isn't in the US, as far as I recall (Australia?) which is why I didn't think it odd that someone used it in a business setting where she is.

Interesting. I have never seen "cheers" in an email form anyone in the US. Only Australia and occasionally, the UK.

Very very generic email sign off here (UK) and there's no thing about not using it in a business setting. It can also mean 'thanks', so if you're sending a mail informing someone that something needs to be done, 'cheers' would be an appropriate sign off.

Ceallach

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #6100 on: August 02, 2014, 11:28:05 PM »
Yes, cheers isn't too uncommon as a sign-off here, particularly in an internal email.  Usually I wouldn't have a problem with it and in fact I use it myself when appropriate.   The issue was really:

1. Telling the staff they were getting extra work (unpaid and outside of hours at that!) instead of discussing with them substituting this task in place of an unpleasant one.  So basically something that should have been a "win" overall instead coming across as a huge negative.

and

2. The flippant, cheerful way it was delivered as if it didn't even occur to her that they might find this announcement unappealing and even somewhat alarming.  Particularly given she's been specifically told she must give her team more TLC and make sure they feel cared about, consulted and engaged.  This was the exact opposite of that.


She's a complete workaholic, and very good at the specific technical skill we hired her for, but she basically wants to be all things to all people.  She's very reactive in the way she handles things and often doesn't stop to think first.   She's desperate to be a manager but I'm pretty sure at some point we'll be moving her sideways into a role that doesn't actually have staff, unless she can get her act together.  Got to play to people's strengths, just because they want to do something doesn't mean they're any good at it.  (Ironically, I myself right now am in the process of moving into a management role without staff, but I'm doing it so I can have work life balance and spend more time with my kids.  I'm the most experienced "people manager" our company has.  So the directors want me to continue to mentor the other managers to make sure the staff are still being managed effectively.  Not sure if it's going to work very well as I won't technically be above them anymore, just consulting from the side, but time will tell! When I have to deal with fixing such silly things as this is worries me though as to what's going to happen when I'm not directly in charge of her and keeping such a close eye on her and her team!)
"Nobody can do everything, but everybody can do something"


Margo

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #6101 on: August 03, 2014, 01:53:07 PM »
I'm in the UK - I've seen it in *internal* work e-mails. IT would not be appropriate in an external mail. It means 'Thanks' so it wouldn't be limited to good news, but it is pretty casual.

perpetua

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #6102 on: August 03, 2014, 01:55:36 PM »
I'm in the UK - I've seen it in *internal* work e-mails. IT would not be appropriate in an external mail. It means 'Thanks' so it wouldn't be limited to good news, but it is pretty casual.

I disagree. You can't generalise like that. It's very industry-dependent. In industries I've worked in it's perfectly appropriate in both internal and external emails, depending on who it's being sent to.

Cherry91

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #6103 on: August 04, 2014, 11:19:13 AM »
This is a personal thing, I admit, but if I'm making a request over email (even if it's a request I know they'll comply with, or that they don't have a choice in for whatever reason), I avoid signing the email off with cheers or thanks because it feels presumptive to thank someone for doing something they haven't actually agreed with yet.
All will be well, and all manner of things will be well.

Mental Magpie

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #6104 on: August 06, 2014, 08:20:39 PM »
This is a personal thing, I admit, but if I'm making a request over email (even if it's a request I know they'll comply with, or that they don't have a choice in for whatever reason), I avoid signing the email off with cheers or thanks because it feels presumptive to thank someone for doing something they haven't actually agreed with yet.

I always see the thanks at the end as "thanks for taking the time to consider this".