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Author Topic: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74  (Read 3429556 times)

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Sirius

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2835 on: September 22, 2012, 11:30:04 AM »
According to Mr. Sirius, who is retired from the military, there's also "good order and discipline" that comes into play in the military, which is why some things that are private in the general public aren't private in the military.  As the sergeant in charge (the NCOIC) of his section he once had to deal with a couple who'd been having an extramarital affair.  Usually this would be no one else's business, but in the military such a thing can cause a breakdown of good order and discipline.  Plus, the affair had ended badly, and the couple's sniping at each other was causing a great deal of discomfort to the others working with them, and he had to counsel them to stop the sniping or face more severe punishment. 


DoubleTrouble

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2836 on: September 22, 2012, 11:48:40 AM »
According to Mr. Sirius, who is retired from the military, there's also "good order and discipline" that comes into play in the military, which is why some things that are private in the general public aren't private in the military.  As the sergeant in charge (the NCOIC) of his section he once had to deal with a couple who'd been having an extramarital affair.  Usually this would be no one else's business, but in the military such a thing can cause a breakdown of good order and discipline.  Plus, the affair had ended badly, and the couple's sniping at each other was causing a great deal of discomfort to the others working with them, and he had to counsel them to stop the sniping or face more severe punishment.

You mean like when the Navy commander faked his death to end his affair? Had a  :o moment when I read that one.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/09/18/michael-ward-navy-sub-commander-faked-death-affair_n_1894254.html

Hillia

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2837 on: September 22, 2012, 12:05:07 PM »
During Desert Storm I, my brother (a 2nd lt at the time) was rotated home because his wife was sleeping her way through the enlisted barracks.  Every new group of men deployed had at least one who would say, 'Oh, YOU'RE BroName' and smirk, not to mention the gossip flying back and forth between deployed and at home men.  It was affecting his ability to properly lead his men. 

Winterlight

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2838 on: September 22, 2012, 06:11:51 PM »
Or the Kelly Flinn case, where a female lieutenant was kicked out for having an affair with a male civilian soccer coach at who was married to her female enlisted subordinate. She'd been given a direct order to stay away from him, which she agreed to- instead, she moved him in with her.
« Last Edit: September 22, 2012, 06:28:07 PM by Winterlight »
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Of whom you speak,
And how, and when, and where.
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akm10

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2839 on: September 23, 2012, 07:06:33 PM »
This was many years ago, but I still remember this employee.

Setting: A small office that was the US headquarters of an Australian company. I was the office "temp" newly out of college, and we just hired a new receptionist. I had covered the job for a few months.

On her first day, she told the President he spelled his name wrong. (Australian/English name, not common here in the US, and if so, usually spelled different.)

Her job included answering the phones, yet within her first week, she was yelling for me to get the ringing phone from the *other* end of the office.  The PD wasn't having me, her backup, answer the phone, it was the yelling across the office.

She objected - loudly - to an aspect of the job that she knew about before she took the job.

She lasted a week, maybe two. And I still can't believe she thought that was acceptable behavior!

Anna

pixel dust

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2840 on: September 30, 2012, 06:15:15 PM »
Alright, I think it's time to share the ridiculousness of my previous job... I'll be quite surprised if this company's East Coast office lasts another year. The treat it like a red-headed stepchild.

The Company is a medium-sized "digital agency" (from web design/development/hosting to SEO and marketing campaigns online). Their main clients are ministry clients and are a very religious agency. I have heard the CFO/head salesman start client meetings with prayers before. The CEO started this company in his early 20's, basically he has never held a job where he was an underling, he has no idea what it's like to be an employee. The headquarters is on the West Coast and the office I worked in was a satellite on the East Coast. HQ had approximately 30-40 people working there, East coast had under 10 people (by the time I left, there were 3 full-time people - including me - and 1 part-time guy who came in about once a week).

There are so many stories of this place I can tell, but for now I'm going to tell me favorite: The Christmas Raffle.

The week before Christmas we have our monthly all-company meeting. For these, we're allowed to buy lunch for the office (get reimbursed for it) and take a longer lunch together. After lunch, we all (3 of us working full-time there at this point) log back on and start working again. To communicate with each other during the day, we G-Chat with each other. After an hour or so we notice status updates from the West Coast Office along the lines of "Merry Christmas to me from Company! I just got an iPad!", "Thanks Company for the Amazon Gift Card!", etc. We on the East Coast as very confused.

To make a long story short, the CEO decided to host a raffle to boost employee morale. He includes new iPads, a Kindle Fire, and a plethora of high $$ gift cards to Apple, Amazon, etc. All employees names were put into a hat and drawn every hour or so.

Every employee except the East Coast employees.

Apparently, out of sight, out of mind.

We contact our West Coast office liaison (who's actually only in the office once a month) and complain. Seriously, how hard would it have been to toss 4 names in the raffle and mail our presents out to us? She was out of the office and didn't know about the raffle. She immediately jumps down the CEO's neck and he says he'll "make it up to us".

Next week I receive a card in the mail. I was the raffle winner! And what did I win? A $10 Starbucks gift card.

Jocelyn

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2841 on: September 30, 2012, 06:36:36 PM »
Reminds me of a former boss. One year for Secretary's Day, he gave the secretaries- and all the non-clinical staff- a nice package of gifts that would be valued at over $100 apiece. The clinical staff got nothing, because 'there's no Clinician's Day'.  He just couldn't see how it would affect morale among the clinicians not to get anything while the non-clinical staff were running around excited with their gift bags.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2842 on: September 30, 2012, 08:49:42 PM »
I witnessed and benifited for the polar opposite of Professional Darwinism.

I had an education student observe me today. She came to our tech meeting, which was short. She had been asking me about the tech I use, so we stayed and our Campus Instructional Technology Specialist answered some of her questions. She mentioned the name of your IT integration professor - We laughed and assured her that he will take his time and make sure she understood everything. (He is our CITS direct boss).

When I got home tonight there was on email from the professor/head of our CITS. He had received an e-mail from the lady that thanked us for helping her and demonstrating how tech can enhance learning and how impress she was with our campus compared to the school her children attend. (We are an old campus, things had to be retrofitted, and we are Title I school. Her kids attend a almost new school in a district that is a major competitor to us. People tend to see our district as an old, rural, backwards district. That isn't who we are.)

The head of CITS/Professor had forwarded the e-mail to my principal, the head of Tech, the head of elementary Ed, and the Superintendent. She has a few years of training. But if she applies that e-mail means her name will be remembered favorably.

That's cool.  The elementary school my boys attend is a Title I school as well, and they have done so much better at this school than they did the one in another county that was known for being a really good school district.  So much so that people would buy houses in the area so their kids could go to certain schools and high schools. It's mean but I have to laugh at times when they'd buy a house so their kid could attend A school and they'd end up going to B school cause the districts changed while the kid was in middle school.

What really pleased me was when my oldest son got to the point that he didn't need an IEP anymore. :)
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

siamesecat2965

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2843 on: October 01, 2012, 02:26:10 PM »
Alright, I think it's time to share the ridiculousness of my previous job... I'll be quite surprised if this company's East Coast office lasts another year. The treat it like a red-headed stepchild.

The Company is a medium-sized "digital agency" (from web design/development/hosting to SEO and marketing campaigns online). Their main clients are ministry clients and are a very religious agency. I have heard the CFO/head salesman start client meetings with prayers before. The CEO started this company in his early 20's, basically he has never held a job where he was an underling, he has no idea what it's like to be an employee. The headquarters is on the West Coast and the office I worked in was a satellite on the East Coast. HQ had approximately 30-40 people working there, East coast had under 10 people (by the time I left, there were 3 full-time people - including me - and 1 part-time guy who came in about once a week).

There are so many stories of this place I can tell, but for now I'm going to tell me favorite: The Christmas Raffle.

The week before Christmas we have our monthly all-company meeting. For these, we're allowed to buy lunch for the office (get reimbursed for it) and take a longer lunch together. After lunch, we all (3 of us working full-time there at this point) log back on and start working again. To communicate with each other during the day, we G-Chat with each other. After an hour or so we notice status updates from the West Coast Office along the lines of "Merry Christmas to me from Company! I just got an iPad!", "Thanks Company for the Amazon Gift Card!", etc. We on the East Coast as very confused.

To make a long story short, the CEO decided to host a raffle to boost employee morale. He includes new iPads, a Kindle Fire, and a plethora of high $$ gift cards to Apple, Amazon, etc. All employees names were put into a hat and drawn every hour or so.

Every employee except the East Coast employees.

Apparently, out of sight, out of mind.

We contact our West Coast office liaison (who's actually only in the office once a month) and complain. Seriously, how hard would it have been to toss 4 names in the raffle and mail our presents out to us? She was out of the office and didn't know about the raffle. She immediately jumps down the CEO's neck and he says he'll "make it up to us".

Next week I receive a card in the mail. I was the raffle winner! And what did I win? A $10 Starbucks gift card.

Wow. Way to make ALL the staff feel valued! Glad to hear its a prior job! 

siamesecat2965

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2844 on: October 01, 2012, 02:29:00 PM »
Reminds me of a former boss. One year for Secretary's Day, he gave the secretaries- and all the non-clinical staff- a nice package of gifts that would be valued at over $100 apiece. The clinical staff got nothing, because 'there's no Clinician's Day'.  He just couldn't see how it would affect morale among the clinicians not to get anything while the non-clinical staff were running around excited with their gift bags.

I don't get bosses like this.  I'm guessing the clinical staff also helped keep things running smoothly, etc. and to leave them out like that is just wrong.  my former employer, a law firm used to give all employees a gift on Secretary's Day, not just the admin staff. Everyone from the attorneys down to the mailroom staff.  Nothing fancy; one year it was a pair of movie tickets, and another, a small box of gourmet muffins, but at least they treated everyone the same, and the card that went out to each employee said as much.

TurtleDove

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2845 on: October 01, 2012, 04:06:15 PM »
After 9/11 my law firm office was brainstorming ways to prepare in case our highrise was attacked (downtown in major US city, though not MAJOR city and not one attacked).  An all employee meeting was held, and our office manager demonstrated for us a method of sawing through the window and parachuting out to safety (which is absurd for a variety of reasons) and then one of the named parthers explained that "each lawyer would get a parachute."  Apparently we were supposed to just hold on to our support staff or go tandem or something? 

We didn't end up going with the parachute plan. 

BB-VA

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2846 on: October 01, 2012, 04:11:21 PM »
Reminds me of a former boss. One year for Secretary's Day, he gave the secretaries- and all the non-clinical staff- a nice package of gifts that would be valued at over $100 apiece. The clinical staff got nothing, because 'there's no Clinician's Day'.  He just couldn't see how it would affect morale among the clinicians not to get anything while the non-clinical staff were running around excited with their gift bags.

I don't get bosses like this.  I'm guessing the clinical staff also helped keep things running smoothly, etc. and to leave them out like that is just wrong.  my former employer, a law firm used to give all employees a gift on Secretary's Day, not just the admin staff. Everyone from the attorneys down to the mailroom staff.  Nothing fancy; one year it was a pair of movie tickets, and another, a small box of gourmet muffins, but at least they treated everyone the same, and the card that went out to each employee said as much.

Who got paid more?   

One of the reasons for Administrative Professionals Day is for employers to show appreciation to their support staff who are usually not paid as well, but work just as hard to keep the company going.

I am not saying the boss was right - in fact, I think it was downright rude to leave the clinicians out.   It should have been everybody or nobody.

I have been an adminstrative professional all my career.  I received exactly one house plant over all 35+ years in celebration of the day.   So, maybe I am a tad cynical about the whole thing.  In fact, I am one of those who believe in only 3 holidays - Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas.  All the others are Hallmark (or insert your choice of company) Holidays and exist only to profit others.
"The Universe puts us in places where we can learn. They are never easy places, but they are right. Wherever we are, it's the right place and the right time. Pain that sometimes comes is part of the process of constantly being born."
- Delenn to Sheridan: "Babylon 5 - Distant Star"

NyaChan

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2847 on: October 01, 2012, 04:14:20 PM »
After 9/11 my law firm office was brainstorming ways to prepare in case our highrise was attacked (downtown in major US city, though not MAJOR city and not one attacked).  An all employee meeting was held, and our office manager demonstrated for us a method of sawing through the window and parachuting out to safety (which is absurd for a variety of reasons) and then one of the named parthers explained that "each lawyer would get a parachute."  Apparently we were supposed to just hold on to our support staff or go tandem or something? 

We didn't end up going with the parachute plan.

And I just burst out into laughter in a relatively quiet public lounge :D  Totally worth the "What is wrong with her?" looks

Sirius

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2848 on: October 01, 2012, 04:15:21 PM »
I know how that can be.  My boss was going to take the people working on our account who work at the office.  But what happened was that the lead MT asked one of the others on our account who works at home to cover while they were at lunch - a person who lived less than 10 minutes away and who could have joined them in person easily.  The person who lived close by got quite upset because it seemed to her that the boss had "forgotten" that she lived only 10 minutes away and she said she felt like the only one not invited to a party. 

I think they should have asked me to cover, since I'm in Oregon and the office is in Ohio, and given the people who work at home close by the option of joining them.   

Iris

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #2849 on: October 01, 2012, 04:49:22 PM »
Reminds me of a former boss. One year for Secretary's Day, he gave the secretaries- and all the non-clinical staff- a nice package of gifts that would be valued at over $100 apiece. The clinical staff got nothing, because 'there's no Clinician's Day'.  He just couldn't see how it would affect morale among the clinicians not to get anything while the non-clinical staff were running around excited with their gift bags.

I don't get bosses like this.  I'm guessing the clinical staff also helped keep things running smoothly, etc. and to leave them out like that is just wrong.  my former employer, a law firm used to give all employees a gift on Secretary's Day, not just the admin staff. Everyone from the attorneys down to the mailroom staff.  Nothing fancy; one year it was a pair of movie tickets, and another, a small box of gourmet muffins, but at least they treated everyone the same, and the card that went out to each employee said as much.

See, I'm a bit with BB-VA on this one. Depending on the job there are people whose work is vital to the company who are rewarded by being paid a lot of money - that's how it is shown that they are appreciated. Admin staff are typically lower paid and (at times) underappreciated. Of course this would have to be taken on a case by case basis because there are many cases where the mainline workers are JUST as underappreciated.

I know when I worked corporate I would have had no problems with the admin staff getting a present on Secretary's day (not really done over here, though). They made half what I made (and I was very junior) but did work hard and do the tedious or unpleasant jobs which meant that I didn't have to do them. Similarly now that I'm a teacher I personally bought a box of chocolates for the photocopy lady last year because she did my photocopying for me, better than I could ever do it, covered rough jobs in an emergency, occasionally had to put up with unpleasant working conditions, and is paid considerably less than me.

As I said it's a case-by-case basis but I don't necessarily think that the idea of rewarding PART of the workforce is necessarily always a bad one.
"Can't do anything with children, can you?" the woman said.

Poirot thought you could, but forebore to say so.