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Author Topic: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74  (Read 3423081 times)

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RubyCat

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3090 on: December 05, 2012, 06:27:46 AM »
I've called in tired before.  I was working nights and had spent the morning in court getting my non-rent-paying tenant evicted.  That story belongs in the Special Snowflake folder.  By the time I was done, I was so worked up I simply could. not. sleep.  At the point where if I could've fallen asleep I would be able to catch 2 hours, I called the supervisor and told her that was having trouble sleeping and didn't feel it would be safe for me to work that night.  It was the one and only time I had to do that so maybe that's why the supervisor was okay with it.

I heard a story the other day about somebody who was known to fall asleep on the job (she worked overnights).  A client she was supposed to be observing took a bad fall and when her explanation of how it happened did not add up, she was fired.  Why she wasn't fired before, I don't know. 

ica171

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3091 on: December 05, 2012, 08:02:43 AM »
That reminds me of an old Sally Forth comic strip: The alarm goes off. She tells her husband she's calling in sleepy. He convinces her not to. She staggers to the bathroom, looks at her reflection in the mirror, and says, "I'm calling in ugly."

Midnight Kitty, I'm with you all the way. I have fibro too, with depression. My employer forced me to take a disability retirement, due to having to take anti-depressants.  :( Oh, well, at least they have to pay me a pension.  >:D

I think I've already told the tale of professional Darwinism from that job...

I've called in scared before.  When I woke up, the entire world was covered in a sheet of ice.  I decided that my meager paycheck wasn't worth the cost of my life.
Fortunately, I had the time to take, so I was all right.

I've gone home scared before. When I worked in a big box store, someone called in a bomb threat. We were all evacuated, bomb squad came and less than ten minutes later had cleared the store. I told the manager I didn't feel comfortable going back in because there was no way a thorough job had been done in that amount of time. He was fine with me leaving.

MissRose

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3092 on: December 05, 2012, 08:07:44 AM »
That reminds me of an old Sally Forth comic strip: The alarm goes off. She tells her husband she's calling in sleepy. He convinces her not to. She staggers to the bathroom, looks at her reflection in the mirror, and says, "I'm calling in ugly."

Midnight Kitty, I'm with you all the way. I have fibro too, with depression. My employer forced me to take a disability retirement, due to having to take anti-depressants.  :( Oh, well, at least they have to pay me a pension.  >:D

I think I've already told the tale of professional Darwinism from that job...

I've called in scared before.  When I woke up, the entire world was covered in a sheet of ice.  I decided that my meager paycheck wasn't worth the cost of my life.
Fortunately, I had the time to take, so I was all right.

I've gone home scared before. When I worked in a big box store, someone called in a bomb threat. We were all evacuated, bomb squad came and less than ten minutes later had cleared the store. I told the manager I didn't feel comfortable going back in because there was no way a thorough job had been done in that amount of time. He was fine with me leaving.

I remember a group of people in my first full time job got to go home early after we learned about the death of a co-worker that was very sudden.  We were allowed some time to grieve the loss, and a few of us did take a day or so to recompose ourselves, plus a few people did go pay their respects to her family.

WillyNilly

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3093 on: December 05, 2012, 08:35:29 AM »
I totally get why a person might call in sleepy.  But why a person would call in sleepy on a Friday with the excuse they needed to be rested up for Monday - thus giving them 3 full days to rest up - is the outrageous part to me.

otterwoman

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3094 on: December 05, 2012, 09:00:42 AM »
A friend worked at a business that was failing. One day he called into work blind. "Blind?" asked his boss. "Blind. I don't see the point of coming in."

Business closed up soon after.

siamesecat2965

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3095 on: December 05, 2012, 10:57:30 AM »
One of the assistants in my department, Rachele, called in sick on Friday.  She said she couldn't come in to work because she was still tired when she woke up and she wanted to be well-rested for Monday.

Did she really call in sleepy?  And she really needed a whole extra day to rest up for Monday?

I've totally called in sleepy before (and I don't have any underlying medical issues that make sleep difficult). Sometimes I just end up with a perfect storm of events that means I got very little sleep, and I wouldn't be able to function without taking a few extra hours to sleep in.

I've never called in sleepy for a whole day, though. Usually, my trade off is work 2-3 hours less, but actually be functional for the remaining 5-6, rather than be totally spaced out and useless for the 8 I'm scheduled to work.

I will admit to calling in sick because I was tired, but I fibbed and just said I wasn't feeling well, which isn't totally untrue. Lack of sleep makes me crabby, cranky, and sometimes feeling ill. But I don't do it very often at all; maybe once every couple of years since I get pretty generous vacation.

AngelicGamer

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3096 on: December 05, 2012, 11:01:03 AM »
Docking this as possible PD: Nurse at King Edward VII's hospital gives out information to a radio show about Duchess of Cambridge's medical details, thinking she was talking to the Queen.  It was a prank call but I'm not sure why nobody could figure that out - that must be one really good impression.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/05/kate-middleton-pregnant-hospital-nurse-radio_n_2243362.html



blue2000

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3097 on: December 05, 2012, 12:50:30 PM »
Docking this as possible PD: Nurse at King Edward VII's hospital gives out information to a radio show about Duchess of Cambridge's medical details, thinking she was talking to the Queen.  It was a prank call but I'm not sure why nobody could figure that out - that must be one really good impression.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/05/kate-middleton-pregnant-hospital-nurse-radio_n_2243362.html

Rumour has it that the show is already on probation for other pranks. I don't think it will take long for the axe to fall.
You are only young once. After that you have to think up some other excuse.

MrTango

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3098 on: December 05, 2012, 12:54:31 PM »
Docking this as possible PD: Nurse at King Edward VII's hospital gives out information to a radio show about Duchess of Cambridge's medical details, thinking she was talking to the Queen.  It was a prank call but I'm not sure why nobody could figure that out - that must be one really good impression.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/05/kate-middleton-pregnant-hospital-nurse-radio_n_2243362.html

Rumour has it that the show is already on probation for other pranks. I don't think it will take long for the axe to fall.

Yeah, it wouldn't surprise me if that was illegal (impersonating a member of the royal family in order to get information that they would not otherwise legally be able to obtain).

NyaChan

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3099 on: December 05, 2012, 01:02:40 PM »
I've called in because I was sleepy/tired before - but I knew better than to say that.  What's bad about this is that when sleep is the reason, there are plenty, plenty of reasons why a person could be that sleepy that are entire that person's fault - Thirsty Thursdays, watching a Criminal Minds marathon, reading a book you were "only going to peek at" (yeah that one's me).  If it was something else that was not that person's fault, I'd expect them to give some sort of hint to that effect.

AngelicGamer

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3100 on: December 05, 2012, 01:25:23 PM »
Docking this as possible PD: Nurse at King Edward VII's hospital gives out information to a radio show about Duchess of Cambridge's medical details, thinking she was talking to the Queen.  It was a prank call but I'm not sure why nobody could figure that out - that must be one really good impression.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/05/kate-middleton-pregnant-hospital-nurse-radio_n_2243362.html

Rumour has it that the show is already on probation for other pranks. I don't think it will take long for the axe to fall.

Yeah, it wouldn't surprise me if that was illegal (impersonating a member of the royal family in order to get information that they would not otherwise legally be able to obtain).

I agree MrTango.  Also, I feel really bad for the nurse and I hope that nothing happens to her.  I do hope that the radio station gets kicked.



snowflake

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3101 on: December 05, 2012, 02:49:59 PM »
Certainly.  She has a right to make a pariah of herself in the name of "free speech."  No one stopped her; she has not been arrested or imprisoned. No governmental entity has said "You can't say that."

And her prospective employers also have the right to free speech.  That speech is "No job for you!"

This. 
The problem with most people when they raise up the cry of "free speech" is that they forget that it is the fact that it covers only "The right to freedom of speech allows individuals to express themselves without interference or constraint by the government."   It doesn't mean that what you say or do doesn't have consequences with other people who have their rights as well.

Some good basics at this site.
http://www.uscourts.gov/EducationalResources/ClassroomActivities/FirstAmendment/WhatDoesFreeSpeechMean.aspx

Exactly.  I once had the fuuuuuuun job of telling a receptionist that she was being fired for talking about certain diseases she had caught at from who.

Any attempt to reprimand her resulted in accusations of being judgmental, a fuddy-duddy and suppressing her free speech.  I finally said in a meeting, "Her personal life is only our business because it's affecting our business."  And for that wisdom I was given the task of canning her.  Yeah, my free speech had some consequences there too!   :-[

Mental Magpie

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3102 on: December 05, 2012, 04:01:34 PM »
I totally get why a person might call in sleepy.  But why a person would call in sleepy on a Friday with the excuse they needed to be rested up for Monday - thus giving them 3 full days to rest up - is the outrageous part to me.

This is exactly it.  It's not the calling off for being tired, it's needing 3 days to make up for being tired.

mmswm

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3103 on: December 05, 2012, 04:22:48 PM »
When I worked for Major Bank, one of the biggest rules we had was that we were not allowed to look up our own accounts on "employee" systems (the mainframe and other systems that employees used to work with customer accounts).  We were allowed to use the internet to go to the online banking site, like any other customer, but we were not to use employee systems as a customer (does that make any sense?). The whole reason was to avoid even the appearance of impropriety.  We had the power to reverse transactions, move money around, do bank originated credits and debits and all that fun stuff, so to mess with your own accounts could look very, very bad.  Also, every movement you make on the computers is tracked, so it would seem obvious that you would get caught in fairly short order.  Anyway, one of my coworkers regularly broke this rule.  He wasn't doing anything "bad", just balancing his checkbook and such,  but still, we'd all been given dire warnings about the consequences of such actions (immediate termination).  Of course, CW was caught and just couldn't understand why he was being let go.
Some people lift weights.  I lift measures.  It's a far more esoteric workout. - (Quoted from a personal friend)

Shalamar

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3104 on: December 05, 2012, 04:31:57 PM »
Whoopsie.   :(  I work for an insurance company, and whereas we can look up our own accounts on the mainframe if we so choose, we don't have access to, y'know, DO stuff to them. 

That reminds me of when I was a newbie programmer at my old job.  I'd been asked to check a bunch of data files for a certain type of data (can't remember what offhand, but it doesn't matter).  Our files were all called something very generic, like "FILE001", so unless you knew from previous experience that FILE001 contained, say, product information, you wouldn't know what the file held until you opened it.  I was able to look at all the files except one, because it was encrypted.  I reported this to my boss, who said "Oh, okay", and neither of us thought anything more about it.

... until a day later, when I was hauled up before the Big Boss to explain why I'd tried to open the file that contained confidential salary information!   Fortunately, I had an excellent excuse (and my boss backed me up), otherwise that could have gone very badly for me.