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Author Topic: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74  (Read 4284791 times)

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Sophia

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3840 on: June 12, 2013, 04:21:28 PM »
...I was also taught that referring to a PhD as "Doctor" was only for professional settings. In social settings or in personal correspondence (including wedding invitations) only M.D.'s should be referred to as "Doctor."

Even that has been fairly recent.  The rule used to be the same for both, professional titles in professional settings only.  If someone introduces themselves as Dr. X at a party, I'll assume they aren't interested in a social relationship

Hillia

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3841 on: June 12, 2013, 04:29:53 PM »
There was a thread on she'll several years ago started by a woman who was irate that people would introduce her husband in social situations as 'Dr. Jones, my dentist'.  She felt that he should have been introduced as 'Dr. Jones,my doctor'  because somehow 'dentist' was demeaning or insulting or something.

mbbored

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3842 on: June 12, 2013, 05:18:03 PM »
There was a thread on she'll several years ago started by a woman who was irate that people would introduce her husband in social situations as 'Dr. Jones, my dentist'.  She felt that he should have been introduced as 'Dr. Jones,my doctor'  because somehow 'dentist' was demeaning or insulting or something.

I had forgotten about that thread! I work with a number of PhDs and veterinarians and most don't like to be called "Doctor" or "a doctor" outside of work for fear that somebody will need a physician and mistakenly grab them. Although one veterinarian did treat a woman who got sick on an airplane because he was the only person around with any kind of medical training. (The woman was incredibly hungover so he simply instructed her to nibble on crackers, drink lots of fluids and take ibuprofen for the headache.)

snowflake

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3843 on: June 12, 2013, 05:26:58 PM »
I once worked with someone who insisted on "Dr."  We were in a research setting so having a PhD was important, but she wasn't a researcher.  She was a business manager.  I wish I could say that her over-the-top snootiness was her most PD trait, but alas I cannot.  She would randomly choose a person to micromanage and make a ton of changes to their job without trying to understand it.  If, say there was a grad student who was working with a researcher she would tell them how to revamp their protocols to save money.  If they protested that the cheaper way wouldn't actually provide the needed data she'd say, "Well I'm the one with a doctorate in biology!" (Even if this was true, that in no way qualified her to create protocols on experiments that she didn't write.)

She lasted about nine months.

After she left we found out that she actually had gotten a certificate in alternative medicine through a course that lasted six months.  Since she was a "licensed practitioner" she claimed it was the same as being a doctor.  While I won't knock alternative medicine (or this particular branch because I have tried it) this practice does not have a formal licensing board in our state. She had a Bachelor's in biology.  We all had a good laugh over that one.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3844 on: June 12, 2013, 05:56:09 PM »
My friend told me about this one and well I don't know if it's PD yet or not because the young woman still seems to be in business but her methods are less than professional.

Okay, bff lives in a small midwest town and takes her dog to the vet to be groomed.  Another groomer opened a business in town and the vet, being rather busy with usual vet business and grooming, recommended quite a few of their patients to this young woman.   Including my friend, who has taken her dog to this groomer at least once and she did a fine job. 

About a week or so ago, friend had an appointment to take her dog to this groomer (who apparently works out of her house) but the woman texted her saying "Sorry, I have a sick child, I can't groom your dog today." That wasn't what bothered my friend.   But when she called to reschedule and found out the groomer was rather booked and wouldn't have an opening for another month, my friend said "Well I'll get him an appointment with the vet then, cause he needs to be groomed for the summer."   

This vet says "Well I heard their new groomer isn't very good, I wouldn't go to them."  Friend told me, and I rather agree, that it seems rather unprofessional to say something like that when they have sent business to her to help get her grooming business going.  And fwiw, friend asked around and apparently no one she knows has had a complaint about the vets new groomer. 

And apparently she called a few times to get friend's dog in and repeated it again that the vet's new groomer isn't very good.
Is the bolded 'vet' supposed to be the new business groomer?

Oops!  Yes, will fix it!
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Nikko-chan

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3845 on: June 12, 2013, 06:07:13 PM »
I never knew my father even had a doctorate until I was an adult, and never knew he was head of the lab he worked in until his funeral, when so many of his former employees came up to tell me what a good boss he was :(.

Your father: He was doing it right.

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3846 on: June 12, 2013, 07:14:36 PM »
I never knew my father even had a doctorate until I was an adult, and never knew he was head of the lab he worked in until his funeral, when so many of his former employees came up to tell me what a good boss he was :(.

Your father: He was doing it right.

Well... I have to disagree, sadly.  A person not knowing major details (education, profession details) about a parent speaks volumes (pardon the pun) about a lack of communication.
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Mental Magpie

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3847 on: June 12, 2013, 07:19:52 PM »
I never knew my father even had a doctorate until I was an adult, and never knew he was head of the lab he worked in until his funeral, when so many of his former employees came up to tell me what a good boss he was :(.

Your father: He was doing it right.

Well... I have to disagree, sadly.  A person not knowing major details (education, profession details) about a parent speaks volumes (pardon the pun) about a lack of communication.

Not necessarily.  Some people don't find those things important in a family.

My fiance's brother did not know their mother moved to California.  While I cannot imagine that happening my family, this is normal for theirs.  His brother wasn't upset/hurt.  That's just how their family is.

That being said, while guihong found it important, apparently her father did not.

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3848 on: June 12, 2013, 08:05:49 PM »
I never knew my father even had a doctorate until I was an adult, and never knew he was head of the lab he worked in until his funeral, when so many of his former employees came up to tell me what a good boss he was :(.

Your father: He was doing it right.

Well... I have to disagree, sadly.  A person not knowing major details (education, profession details) about a parent speaks volumes (pardon the pun) about a lack of communication.

Not necessarily.  Some people don't find those things important in a family.

My fiance's brother did not know their mother moved to California.  While I cannot imagine that happening my family, this is normal for theirs.  His brother wasn't upset/hurt.  That's just how their family is.

That being said, while guihong found it important, apparently her father did not.

Normal for them or not, it's still a lack of communication... it just isn't a troublesome one for them.
Location:
Philadelphia, PA

Library Dragon

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3849 on: June 12, 2013, 08:06:50 PM »
Talk of Ph.D.s reminds e of a PD story of a whole company.

BG:  One of our parish's deacons has a Ph.D. in physics and worked for a company where EVERYBODY had Ph.D.s.  They added little ribbons to their ID tags for patents. For each patent you received a ribbon. Things as picky as where you sat in the cafeteria was determined by how many ribbons you had.  The senior executives thought they were the smartest geeks on the block./BG

The senior executives acquired patented information from a competitor.  They decided that they would illegally use the patent.  Friend was told of he plans, to get on board, and that they would all make lots of money.  "No one will know." Friend refused, wisely kept a paper trail, email trail, etc. 

You know what's coming  ;)

The thieving company faced a major lawsuit and criminal charges.  Of course they tried to throw Friend under the bus.  He was the only one of the execs to survive unscathed and was offered a VP position in a blue chip tech company.

The senior execs may have had Ph.D.s and lots of patent ribbons, but they were not real bright.

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Mental Magpie

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3850 on: June 12, 2013, 08:23:50 PM »
I never knew my father even had a doctorate until I was an adult, and never knew he was head of the lab he worked in until his funeral, when so many of his former employees came up to tell me what a good boss he was :(.

Your father: He was doing it right.

Well... I have to disagree, sadly.  A person not knowing major details (education, profession details) about a parent speaks volumes (pardon the pun) about a lack of communication.

Not necessarily.  Some people don't find those things important in a family.

My fiance's brother did not know their mother moved to California.  While I cannot imagine that happening my family, this is normal for theirs.  His brother wasn't upset/hurt.  That's just how their family is.

That being said, while guihong found it important, apparently her father did not.

Normal for them or not, it's still a lack of communication... it just isn't a troublesome one for them.

Yes, I agree it is, but the way you phrased it with a precursor of "sadly", I presumed you meant it to be a negative lack of communication.  I thusly argued that it is not necessarily negative.  Not arguing now, btw, just pointing out why I responded the way I did.

Dr. F.

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3851 on: June 12, 2013, 09:26:34 PM »
Talk of Ph.D.s reminds e of a PD story of a whole company.

BG:  One of our parish's deacons has a Ph.D. in physics and worked for a company where EVERYBODY had Ph.D.s.  They added little ribbons to their ID tags for patents. For each patent you received a ribbon. Things as picky as where you sat in the cafeteria was determined by how many ribbons you had.  The senior executives thought they were the smartest geeks on the block./BG

The senior executives acquired patented information from a competitor.  They decided that they would illegally use the patent.  Friend was told of he plans, to get on board, and that they would all make lots of money.  "No one will know." Friend refused, wisely kept a paper trail, email trail, etc. 

You know what's coming  ;)

The thieving company faced a major lawsuit and criminal charges.  Of course they tried to throw Friend under the bus.  He was the only one of the execs to survive unscathed and was offered a VP position in a blue chip tech company.

The senior execs may have had Ph.D.s and lots of patent ribbons, but they were not real bright.

It doesn't particularly require a lot of intelligence to get a Ph.D. Determination, yes. One of the dumbest people I've ever met had a Ph.D.*, and one of the smartest (my grandfather) had an 8th grade education.

*Note: He was dumb particularly because he couldn't grasp what he didn't know. He was convinced he knew EVERYTHING, leading to massive failures all around. He could memorize and organize facts, but had very little emotional intelligence.

Garden Goblin

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3852 on: June 12, 2013, 09:59:11 PM »
So does this mean when I complete my MBA in a couple months, it's not okay for me to insist everyone call me Master?

bloo

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3853 on: June 12, 2013, 10:08:52 PM »
An amusing and practical exception to that: my aunt L has a doctorate in biology and taught college biology for many years. When my grandmother was quite old and in the hospital, that aunt (rather than my mother or other aunt) was Speaker to the Hospital as much as possible, and she would always introduce herself as "Dr. B" rather than "Ms. B." It got more respect and more detailed medical information. This worked because her degree is in biology (rather than chemistry or ancient history), so she understood the details and could and did ask appropriate questions. (My mother could, in theory, have insisted on being "Dr R" even though she doesn't have a doctorate, but the same information phrased the same way would not have been useful to her.)

I have a friend that is veterinarian and you'd never know she's a doctor just by talking to her and when her DD had a serious medical issue she pulled the 'Dr.' card on an arrogant physician for the same purposes: to get more respect and more detailed information. I'd have done the same.

MariaE

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #3854 on: June 12, 2013, 11:19:48 PM »
So does this mean when I complete my MBA in a couple months, it's not okay for me to insist everyone call me Master?

I have a MSc and my official job title is "Master" ;)

No, I'm not kidding. It's supposed to be short for Master Specialist, but it honestly is just "Master".
« Last Edit: June 13, 2013, 01:04:44 AM by MariaE »
 
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