Author Topic: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74  (Read 1319471 times)

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Bexx27

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4530 on: September 20, 2013, 03:31:29 PM »
We had a fringe group in elaborate robes that would set up pedestals near our math building and then preach about how America (where we are) is full of terrible, selfish ungodly people and how women shouldn't be allowed to go to college or get jobs. Women should be married out of high school and stay at home the rest of their lives taking care of the house and children.

This was in 2011.  :o

Nutcases still abound.
http://www.fixthefamily.com/blog/6-reasons-to-not-send-your-daughter-to-college


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There are many religions and cultures that treat women just as horribly and hold many of the same views, but we'd be severely chastised or banned if we even thought about linking to them or talking about them.  Why is this any different?  Because it's an American group?

I don't understand. The first post was specifically about this attitude with regard to American women. The second poster linked to a group that holds this view of American women. Are you saying we shouldn't be able to mention a sexist ideology unless we also mention every other sexist ideology in the world, or are you saying we shouldn't be able to mention any of them?
How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these. -George Washington Carver

deadbody

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4531 on: September 20, 2013, 03:31:40 PM »
If you work at home you've got to have self-discipline.  I work from home, and I'm expected to be working on my account at a certain time.  My biggest issue is that I'm in a different state and three hours behind the office, and occasionally they forget to tell me things.  I guess that's a good thing:  I'm so reliable that no one needs to give me a second thought.  (Sigh.)

We have a lot of work from home reps at my company.

One of the biggest requirements is that employees cannot be caring for their children while they are working (if they can't be home alone, they need to be cared for since the employee needs to be focused on work).  And yet whenever at-home reps need to be in the office for something, they get in a panic because 'CRUD MONKEYS! I need to arrange someone to watch my kids!'.

I don't know there is a difference to me depending on the age of the kids.  When DS was about 9 I would have had no problem working from home with him somewhere in the house, he could be trusted to be quiet when needed etc... but I would not have left him home alone for 8 hours while I went to the office.

Hillia

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4532 on: September 20, 2013, 03:32:59 PM »
BF has the option to work from home occasionally. Usually when he does, he's just monitoring a situation and doesn't have to be active in the conversation, so he'll be on a group Skype chat and mute it and do whatever else he wants to do while still paying enough attention to know if he's needed.

There was one meeting like that where one guy was trying to manage three kids. His wife had apparently run out for something, but she usually watched the kids, so now he was on his own with them. His role wasn't much more active than BF's, but one of the kids was constantly unmuting the Skype conversation, so you could hear a small one screaming in the background and the two older ones running wild while this poor dad was trying to manage them all until his wife got back. It was funny, until you realized that this was his job and these were his peers and supervisors who were listening to this.

A coworker was resigning from the company. She worked from home, and had childcare arranged for her toddler son.  On her last day, however, her childcare fell through, and she figured her last day would be pretty low-key.  She and I were on a call finalizing some tasks, when her son came in and started asking her to go outside and play.  She told him no, Mommy was working now; he should go and play and they'd go outside later.  This very disappointed little voice came over the line, 'oohhhhh'.

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Slartibartfast

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4533 on: September 20, 2013, 03:36:34 PM »
I think working from home with kids involved also depends a lot on the type of job.  Outsourced call center, where you have to be ready to answer the phone professionally at a moment's notice?  Absolutely not appropriate to have kids around.  Computer programmer working solo, trying to finish a specific task, with well-behaved older children in the house?  Probably not an issue, because interruptions would be limited to informational requests like "Mom, can I make myself a sandwich?"

norrina

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4534 on: September 20, 2013, 03:47:01 PM »
If you work at home you've got to have self-discipline.  I work from home, and I'm expected to be working on my account at a certain time.  My biggest issue is that I'm in a different state and three hours behind the office, and occasionally they forget to tell me things.  I guess that's a good thing:  I'm so reliable that no one needs to give me a second thought.  (Sigh.)

We have a lot of work from home reps at my company.

One of the biggest requirements is that employees cannot be caring for their children while they are working (if they can't be home alone, they need to be cared for since the employee needs to be focused on work).  And yet whenever at-home reps need to be in the office for something, they get in a panic because 'CRUD MONKEYS! I need to arrange someone to watch my kids!'.

Busted! Then are are some, like my one boss, who will email us to let us know she's "working from home" because she has to go to the bank, and here and there. Um, if you're out running errands, you are NOT working.

Is there another boss over your boss, or is your boss the head of the company? I have my own business, and often work nights and weekends, with the payoff being that if I want to run errands or just lay out at the beach or sleep late on a random Tuesday, I can and I do. Right now I don't have any employees, but I don't intend to change my pattern if/when I do. If anything, I'll be in the office even less because I'll be paying someone else to be there for me! I probably won't say I'm "working from home", I'll just say I won't be in the office, or will be in at X time, but even when I'm not in the office I'm still available by phone or email via my phone, so I am to an extent "working from home" even when I'm doing other things too.



nuit93

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4535 on: September 20, 2013, 04:09:02 PM »
If you work at home you've got to have self-discipline.  I work from home, and I'm expected to be working on my account at a certain time.  My biggest issue is that I'm in a different state and three hours behind the office, and occasionally they forget to tell me things.  I guess that's a good thing:  I'm so reliable that no one needs to give me a second thought.  (Sigh.)

We have a lot of work from home reps at my company.

One of the biggest requirements is that employees cannot be caring for their children while they are working (if they can't be home alone, they need to be cared for since the employee needs to be focused on work).  And yet whenever at-home reps need to be in the office for something, they get in a panic because 'CRUD MONKEYS! I need to arrange someone to watch my kids!'.

I don't know there is a difference to me depending on the age of the kids.  When DS was about 9 I would have had no problem working from home with him somewhere in the house, he could be trusted to be quiet when needed etc... but I would not have left him home alone for 8 hours while I went to the office.

I was a latchkey kid around 8-9, and I also remember there being days where mom had to take me to work with her.  It was a grocery store, so I was firmly instructed to stay in the break room and be QUIET.  Was never more than an hour or two, and as long as I had a book or ten with me I didn't care.

nuit93

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4536 on: September 20, 2013, 04:09:49 PM »
I think working from home with kids involved also depends a lot on the type of job.  Outsourced call center, where you have to be ready to answer the phone professionally at a moment's notice?  Absolutely not appropriate to have kids around.  Computer programmer working solo, trying to finish a specific task, with well-behaved older children in the house?  Probably not an issue, because interruptions would be limited to informational requests like "Mom, can I make myself a sandwich?"

Mine was a call center, hence the "no kids while you're working" request.

Firecat

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4537 on: September 20, 2013, 04:26:58 PM »
If you work at home you've got to have self-discipline.  I work from home, and I'm expected to be working on my account at a certain time.  My biggest issue is that I'm in a different state and three hours behind the office, and occasionally they forget to tell me things.  I guess that's a good thing:  I'm so reliable that no one needs to give me a second thought.  (Sigh.)

We have a lot of work from home reps at my company.

One of the biggest requirements is that employees cannot be caring for their children while they are working (if they can't be home alone, they need to be cared for since the employee needs to be focused on work).  And yet whenever at-home reps need to be in the office for something, they get in a panic because 'CRUD MONKEYS! I need to arrange someone to watch my kids!'.

I don't know there is a difference to me depending on the age of the kids.  When DS was about 9 I would have had no problem working from home with him somewhere in the house, he could be trusted to be quiet when needed etc... but I would not have left him home alone for 8 hours while I went to the office.

I was a latchkey kid around 8-9, and I also remember there being days where mom had to take me to work with her.  It was a grocery store, so I was firmly instructed to stay in the break room and be QUIET.  Was never more than an hour or two, and as long as I had a book or ten with me I didn't care.

I can remember going to work with my dad sometimes. Dad worked as a mechanic repairing farm machinery (tractors, combines, etc.) Usually he'd set me up in the cab or on the seat of a tractor with my book and strict instructions to touch NOTHING. We had a small farm, too, so I'd been around machinery all my life and knew he was not kidding about not touching/messing with stuff. Or sometimes, if what he was doing wasn't especially tricky or dangerous, I could stand quietly to the side and watch and he'd talk about what he was doing.

My mom worked part-time at a small library, too, and I'd go with her sometimes. The main librarian didn't mind; she knew I could be quiet and would quite happily sit there reading. She was pretty amused when I got bored one day and proceeded to alphabetize all the paperback romance novels (they were just on racks, and usually in no particular order).

Shoo

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4538 on: September 20, 2013, 05:17:43 PM »
We had a fringe group in elaborate robes that would set up pedestals near our math building and then preach about how America (where we are) is full of terrible, selfish ungodly people and how women shouldn't be allowed to go to college or get jobs. Women should be married out of high school and stay at home the rest of their lives taking care of the house and children.

This was in 2011.  :o

Nutcases still abound.
http://www.fixthefamily.com/blog/6-reasons-to-not-send-your-daughter-to-college


W.O.W.com

There are many religions and cultures that treat women just as horribly and hold many of the same views, but we'd be severely chastised or banned if we even thought about linking to them or talking about them.  Why is this any different?  Because it's an American group?

I don't understand. The first post was specifically about this attitude with regard to American women. The second poster linked to a group that holds this view of American women. Are you saying we shouldn't be able to mention a sexist ideology unless we also mention every other sexist ideology in the world, or are you saying we shouldn't be able to mention any of them?

I am saying this is a religious group and I don't like seeing ANY religious group bashed, regardless of what they believe.  I don't agree with them, but I still don't think it's right.

Imagine if we started bashing other religious groups that don't hold a favorable opinion of women.  I mean, can you even imagine what would happen here?  The outrage?  The uproar? 

MariaE

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4539 on: September 20, 2013, 05:27:21 PM »
If you work at home you've got to have self-discipline.  I work from home, and I'm expected to be working on my account at a certain time.  My biggest issue is that I'm in a different state and three hours behind the office, and occasionally they forget to tell me things.  I guess that's a good thing:  I'm so reliable that no one needs to give me a second thought.  (Sigh.)

We have a lot of work from home reps at my company.

One of the biggest requirements is that employees cannot be caring for their children while they are working (if they can't be home alone, they need to be cared for since the employee needs to be focused on work).  And yet whenever at-home reps need to be in the office for something, they get in a panic because 'CRUD MONKEYS! I need to arrange someone to watch my kids!'.

Busted! Then are are some, like my one boss, who will email us to let us know she's "working from home" because she has to go to the bank, and here and there. Um, if you're out running errands, you are NOT working.
She might just be distributing her hours differently to allow time for the errands. I work approx 8 hours a day. If I'm in the office it'll be from 8-16. But if I'm at home it might be 7-11 stop for two hours to run errands, continue working 13-17. Still 8 hours of work even though I ran errands as well. And I might very well ask my boss for permission to work from home "because I have some errands to run" (usually dentist, doctor etc.).
 
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siamesecat2965

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4540 on: September 20, 2013, 06:52:19 PM »


Is there another boss over your boss, or is your boss the head of the company? I have my own business, and often work nights and weekends, with the payoff being that if I want to run errands or just lay out at the beach or sleep late on a random Tuesday, I can and I do. Right now I don't have any employees, but I don't intend to change my pattern if/when I do. If anything, I'll be in the office even less because I'll be paying someone else to be there for me! I probably won't say I'm "working from home", I'll just say I won't be in the office, or will be in at X time, but even when I'm not in the office I'm still available by phone or email via my phone, so I am to an extent "working from home" even when I'm doing other things too.

there is, but the expectation is if you work from home, you work essentially the same hours, and the same number of hours that you would if you were in the office. In my company, there is no "well, I started at 4am so I'm done at 12pm" the rest of the company works "normal" business hours, with some flexibility on start and end times, but we have core business hours when everyone is expected to work.

I think in your case, you own the business, so you can make the rules, and I'm sure any employees you would have would also be aware of this, and act accordingly. and you also said you would plan to be "available" even if you were out of the office.

siamesecat2965

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4541 on: September 20, 2013, 06:56:04 PM »
If you work at home you've got to have self-discipline.  I work from home, and I'm expected to be working on my account at a certain time.  My biggest issue is that I'm in a different state and three hours behind the office, and occasionally they forget to tell me things.  I guess that's a good thing:  I'm so reliable that no one needs to give me a second thought.  (Sigh.)

We have a lot of work from home reps at my company.

One of the biggest requirements is that employees cannot be caring for their children while they are working (if they can't be home alone, they need to be cared for since the employee needs to be focused on work).  And yet whenever at-home reps need to be in the office for something, they get in a panic because 'CRUD MONKEYS! I need to arrange someone to watch my kids!'.

Busted! Then are are some, like my one boss, who will email us to let us know she's "working from home" because she has to go to the bank, and here and there. Um, if you're out running errands, you are NOT working.
She might just be distributing her hours differently to allow time for the errands. I work approx 8 hours a day. If I'm in the office it'll be from 8-16. But if I'm at home it might be 7-11 stop for two hours to run errands, continue working 13-17. Still 8 hours of work even though I ran errands as well. And I might very well ask my boss for permission to work from home "because I have some errands to run" (usually dentist, doctor etc.).

No. there is a pattern with this one, and please don't get me started, of coming and going as she pleases, taking 1-2 hour lunches, making all kinds of appointments during working hours. And as I said in my post above, while we have flex time, we have core business hours you are expected to work. whether from home or in the office, and if you are home, you are pretty much expected to be there, doing your job. 

Once in a while, sure, if you need to schedule around something, but this boss makes a habit of this, on a daily basis. We are all convinced she does this so as NOT to have to do it during "her"time, aka the hours she isn't working.

we are all sick to death of it, but management for some reason, turns a blind eye, or really just doesn't pay attention. she truly abuses the privilege of working from home

TeamBhakta

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4542 on: September 20, 2013, 07:35:47 PM »
I was watching a news story about a Coast Guard cocaine bust. First the reporter talked, then went to a video of the kilos sitting on the ground. That part of the story was set to a song about "COCAIIIINNNNE! COCAIIINNNNE!" for 3 seconds.  ???

rain

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4543 on: September 20, 2013, 08:03:02 PM »
years ago at ____ Middle School when got the best janitor ever

he was helpful, never complained about the messes or all the specialized equipment our students needed

now sometimes things would get hectic and we'd misplace stuff, it happens... but eventually we'd realized that stuff was actually missing, not misplaced   :(


Turns out wonderful janitor was stealing the equipment  :o ??? -have no clue what he could need adaptive switches, etc for

Turns out the cheapest items he stole got him the biggest prison sentence - he stole federal property - "Books for the Blind" books on tape
"oh we thank thee lord for the things we need, like the wind and the rain and the apple seed"

Jocelyn

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4544 on: September 20, 2013, 08:26:32 PM »
Busted! Then are are some, like my one boss, who will email us to let us know she's "working from home" because she has to go to the bank, and here and there. Um, if you're out running errands, you are NOT working.
I think that depends. If a person is putting in an 8 hour day from home, does it matter if it's the same 8 hours that the office is putting in? For example, I teach online. It works well for my students for me to be online at several times during the day. If I'm going to be putting in a few hours work in the evening, I don't think it's unreasonable for me to be allowed to take off a few hours during the day.