Author Topic: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74  (Read 1376201 times)

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eltf177

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4680 on: October 08, 2013, 08:29:12 AM »
Speaking of government employees, my father has a coworker who might not be trying to commit PD, but it sure looks odd.

Dad works for Large Government Organization, with a union. Said LGO and union have a VERY generous leave policy. As in, Dad has only been there for eight years and already has six or seven weeks of leave (sick and vacation) he can take every year. I can only imagine what the lifers have. Also, you can roll it over from year to year without issue, and can cash out up to six weeks when you retire as a nice going away present. Like I said, very generous.

Dad has a coworker who has been with the LGO for years longer than Dad. And this coworker uses up all of his sick and vacation time Every Single Year. Okay, that in and of itself isnít so bad. Itís his time, he can do with it what he will. But then he also take a few weeks of unpaid leave. To do things like a Bible camp with his children Ė a vacation, or at least something that can be accounted for a while in advance. This year, he has to have surgery. Itís September, heís already used up all his time. So instead of putting in for that unpaid leave like usual, he asks other employees to donate their time, b/c, you know, this was so unexpected (knee surgery, I think), and he canít handle this much time unpaid.

Dad declined donating time.

Update on this gem.

He's off for his surgery. People have donated time to him so he can continue to be paid. And what does he post to Facebook? How he's going on vacation. I'm sure the union will do nothing.

(I think this might irk dad even more than most b/c he specifically avoided going Out of State with Mom while he was out after knee surgery, not b/c he was physically unable, but b/c he was on workerís comp and didnít want to temp a fraud suit.)

Personally I would demand my donated time back! This will sour everyone on donating ever again and will punish those who truly need the help.

TeamBhakta

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4681 on: October 08, 2013, 02:31:30 PM »
Went to a pizza buffet for lunch, where the waitresses bring unlimited drinks and plates of salad to your table. My parents quietly commented, after our drink orders were taken, "Oh no.  :( Dad and I had this waitress the other day. She never came back. Had to point out to her we wanted drink and salad refills." Uh-oh. We were barely through with the first helpings when our waitress dumped the check on the table and said "Here's the bill. Pay at the counter whenever you want. Have a nice day." Dad had to flag her down as she was quickly walking away then! She never offered salad or drink refills, until we waved her over. She dropped off the refills and left. And waitresses at this buffet always ask if you want a to-go drink cup or a dessert order; she skipped that, too. The restaurant wasn't even crowded. None of us will sit in her section again  :P

cwm

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4682 on: October 08, 2013, 02:48:51 PM »
My sister called in sick for me one day- I had food poisoning.

This was many many years ago,  before cellphones and when older houses -as ours was - usually had one phone and they were hardwired so you couldn't move them from room to room. I was upstairs; the phone was downstairs.

The boss intimated that food poisoning was maybe a not good excuse. My sister -who is ruthless when she has to be- pointed out that constant vomiting is not what customers at a fast food restaurant want to see. They got into it further and the boss finally agreed that I was calling in. Then she told my sister that I should be the one calling in. Thoroughly fed up my sister snapped "she would if she could make it downstairs to the phone without throwing up!"

Thus my passed my first day with a new store manager. Needless to say she never warmed up to me.

I've been fired from a sum total of one job. I was working at the alumni center at college and got shingles. I couldn't leave the dorm room except to go to the ER for pain. I called in the first day after I got diagnosed and spoke with a student supervisor. I told them that I was contagious and couldn't come in to work, that I would provide them with a doctor's note upon my return. Not a problem, I was told.

My evening shift comes, and I get a phone call. I'm passed out from pain and miss it. Check my voicemail, it's my manager wanting to know where I am. I call her back and repeat the conversation I had with the student supervisor earlier that afternoon. "Oh, well, she never mentioned it or wrote a note for me. I'm going to have to count this as an unexcused absence."

Okay, fine, I tell her again (second time I've told her, third time I've told someone in a supervisory position working there) that I will not be in until the doctor clears me as non-contagious and I can actually sit up and speak without extreme pain. I'm told that will be satisfactory, as long as I can produce a doctor's note when I come back. Okay, great. Pass out again.

The next day I had a morning shift (weird for a call center, but I did work with mailings as well). Third manager calls me, higher than the other two, wondering where I am. I explain both of the conversations I'd had the previous day, explain a fourth time that I am contagious, cannot come in to work and will provide a doctor's note when I return. Third manager has no notes from previous two supervisors, and since I didn't call before my shift and let her know, this would be an unexcused absence, but both absences will be forgiven when I return with a doctor's note.

The next evening, I had another shift. The second manager called me again wondering where I was. As though shingles clears up over two days. I explain to her a third time that I cannot come in. I am sick. I will let them know when the doctor clears me for work again.

The next day I was let go because of multiple unexcused absences and refusal to come in to work when told to. At that point I was too sick to fight it, so I waited until I healed and found another job.

Midnight Kitty

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4683 on: October 08, 2013, 06:41:29 PM »
Speaking of government employees, my father has a coworker who might not be trying to commit PD, but it sure looks odd.

Dad works for Large Government Organization, with a union. Said LGO and union have a VERY generous leave policy. As in, Dad has only been there for eight years and already has six or seven weeks of leave (sick and vacation) he can take every year. I can only imagine what the lifers have. Also, you can roll it over from year to year without issue, and can cash out up to six weeks when you retire as a nice going away present. Like I said, very generous.

Dad has a coworker who has been with the LGO for years longer than Dad. And this coworker uses up all of his sick and vacation time Every Single Year. Okay, that in and of itself isnít so bad. Itís his time, he can do with it what he will. But then he also take a few weeks of unpaid leave. To do things like a Bible camp with his children Ė a vacation, or at least something that can be accounted for a while in advance. This year, he has to have surgery. Itís September, heís already used up all his time. So instead of putting in for that unpaid leave like usual, he asks other employees to donate their time, b/c, you know, this was so unexpected (knee surgery, I think), and he canít handle this much time unpaid.

Dad declined donating time.

Update on this gem.

He's off for his surgery. People have donated time to him so he can continue to be paid. And what does he post to Facebook? How he's going on vacation. I'm sure the union will do nothing.

(I think this might irk dad even more than most b/c he specifically avoided going Out of State with Mom while he was out after knee surgery, not b/c he was physically unable, but b/c he was on workerís comp and didnít want to temp a fraud suit.)
Wait a gosh darned minute ... He's using donated sick leave to go on vacation?  "Go on vacation" as in "leave the area to have fun somewhere else"?  Forget about the union.  I don't think they fix this kind of stuff.  I think I would take a screen shot of that Facebook page in to HR and tell them I want my donated sick leave back since I donated it to this fool so he could have knee surgery, not so he could "recouperate" in Cabo San Lucas.
"The first rule is to keep an untroubled spirit.  The second is to look things in the face and know them for what they are."

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jedikaiti

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4684 on: October 08, 2013, 10:06:23 PM »
Speaking of government employees, my father has a coworker who might not be trying to commit PD, but it sure looks odd.

Dad works for Large Government Organization, with a union. Said LGO and union have a VERY generous leave policy. As in, Dad has only been there for eight years and already has six or seven weeks of leave (sick and vacation) he can take every year. I can only imagine what the lifers have. Also, you can roll it over from year to year without issue, and can cash out up to six weeks when you retire as a nice going away present. Like I said, very generous.

Dad has a coworker who has been with the LGO for years longer than Dad. And this coworker uses up all of his sick and vacation time Every Single Year. Okay, that in and of itself isnít so bad. Itís his time, he can do with it what he will. But then he also take a few weeks of unpaid leave. To do things like a Bible camp with his children Ė a vacation, or at least something that can be accounted for a while in advance. This year, he has to have surgery. Itís September, heís already used up all his time. So instead of putting in for that unpaid leave like usual, he asks other employees to donate their time, b/c, you know, this was so unexpected (knee surgery, I think), and he canít handle this much time unpaid.

Dad declined donating time.

Update on this gem.

He's off for his surgery. People have donated time to him so he can continue to be paid. And what does he post to Facebook? How he's going on vacation. I'm sure the union will do nothing.

(I think this might irk dad even more than most b/c he specifically avoided going Out of State with Mom while he was out after knee surgery, not b/c he was physically unable, but b/c he was on workerís comp and didnít want to temp a fraud suit.)
Wait a gosh darned minute ... He's using donated sick leave to go on vacation?  "Go on vacation" as in "leave the area to have fun somewhere else"?  Forget about the union.  I don't think they fix this kind of stuff.  I think I would take a screen shot of that Facebook page in to HR and tell them I want my donated sick leave back since I donated it to this fool so he could have knee surgery, not so he could "recouperate" in Cabo San Lucas.

BINGO!
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

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z_squared82

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4685 on: October 09, 2013, 08:59:56 AM »
Speaking of government employees, my father has a coworker who might not be trying to commit PD, but it sure looks odd.

Dad works for Large Government Organization, with a union. Said LGO and union have a VERY generous leave policy. As in, Dad has only been there for eight years and already has six or seven weeks of leave (sick and vacation) he can take every year. I can only imagine what the lifers have. Also, you can roll it over from year to year without issue, and can cash out up to six weeks when you retire as a nice going away present. Like I said, very generous.

Dad has a coworker who has been with the LGO for years longer than Dad. And this coworker uses up all of his sick and vacation time Every Single Year. Okay, that in and of itself isnít so bad. Itís his time, he can do with it what he will. But then he also take a few weeks of unpaid leave. To do things like a Bible camp with his children Ė a vacation, or at least something that can be accounted for a while in advance. This year, he has to have surgery. Itís September, heís already used up all his time. So instead of putting in for that unpaid leave like usual, he asks other employees to donate their time, b/c, you know, this was so unexpected (knee surgery, I think), and he canít handle this much time unpaid.

Dad declined donating time.

Update on this gem.

He's off for his surgery. People have donated time to him so he can continue to be paid. And what does he post to Facebook? How he's going on vacation. I'm sure the union will do nothing.

(I think this might irk dad even more than most b/c he specifically avoided going Out of State with Mom while he was out after knee surgery, not b/c he was physically unable, but b/c he was on workerís comp and didnít want to temp a fraud suit.)
Wait a gosh darned minute ... He's using donated sick leave to go on vacation?  "Go on vacation" as in "leave the area to have fun somewhere else"?  Forget about the union.  I don't think they fix this kind of stuff.  I think I would take a screen shot of that Facebook page in to HR and tell them I want my donated sick leave back since I donated it to this fool so he could have knee surgery, not so he could "recouperate" in Cabo San Lucas.

BINGO!

Well, that'll be someone else's job. Dad didn't donate the time, nor does he have Facebook. He heard about the vacation post from a reliable coworker. I'm sure I'll hear more later.

nutraxfornerves

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4686 on: October 09, 2013, 11:13:35 AM »
Even if you are off-duty, as a police officer, it's not a good idea for you to join in when a bunch of motorcyclists attack an SUV. Bonus points if you lie to your superiors about you involvement.

NYPD detective faces charges after video shows he pounded on SUV

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Snooks

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4687 on: October 09, 2013, 01:00:12 PM »
This isn't so much professional Darwinism but it's certainly a case of your previous behaviour biting you in the butt.

I'm involved in Girl Scouts.  The group I run is severely under subscribed mainly because the leader of the group that is supposed to feed in to ours refuses to help us by encouraging girls to move up once they reach the age they can join us, instead she gives them "helper" roles at her group.  We compromised and agreed only to run our meetings when her group isn't meeting (school holidays) so the girls could attend both groups.

At the beginning of this year (I know because it was raised at an area meeting) she told us she was running a trip just for the older girls to go to an activity center.  I was p*ssed because she'd basically run an activity that a) severely stepped into the area we're trying to grow and b) done it during school holidays and basically wiped out the chances of us meeting during that holiday.

The trip is in 2 weeks, so has been planned for 10 months.  Yesterday I got an email stating that they had agreed to take 15 girls which was more than she could take on her licence (licences are needed to run groups and are ratio-ed depending on the age group), could I help out?  I don't have a licence that allows me to take girls away, I honestly don't know if my licence could have let me help her out but it fell into the a lack of planning on your part does not constitute an emergency on mine.  If she'd been super helpful to me and really encouraged the girls to come to our meetings (which they do enjoy) or even bothered to respond to a single solitary email I've ever sent her I might have gone to our district leader and seen if I could help but her previous behaviour led to me responding "Sorry, don't have a licence also, this is very short notice".

You don't get to block us at every turn (including offering an enticing long distance trip to our girls at the end of one of our meetings i.e. she came in at the end of our meeting to hand out the letters for a trip which would have taken place in two years - clearly designed to keep the girls in her group for that long as they wouldn't have been able to go otherwise) and then expect help when you've over promised to them.

It's this sort of ridiculous behaviour and lack of support from above that makes me want to give up scouting.

Midnight Kitty

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4688 on: October 09, 2013, 01:34:42 PM »
Snooks,

It almost sounds like she doesn't want "her little girls" to grow up and leave the nest.  I've met parents like this.  Heck, my beloved BIL would prefer that his daughter's not leave his home until they marry.  The oldest is in her early 30s and the youngest is in her late 20s.  He doesn't charge them anything for room and board, provides cars with insurance to them at no cost (he even pays for the gas), etc.  Plus, he doesn't try to control them with the purse strings, so he's likely to get his wish.  They are smart girls; Why would they leave such a cozy nest?  I can't imagine why a scout leader would not want her scouts to move up to the next level.  Doesn't she have more young girls coming in?  Does she like the older girls more?  How can she lead both her current group of young girls AND an older group of "helpers"?  Does she have no other commitments in her life?  Or is she just an exceedingly controlling person?  If so, I would think the older girls would be happy to move up to the next level with increased independence appropriate to that age group.

Good luck,
MK
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ladyknight1

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4689 on: October 09, 2013, 01:40:41 PM »
As a Boy Scout volunteer, I get exactly what you are saying. I hope you can reach out to other volunteers and get away from the other leader.

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4690 on: October 09, 2013, 02:51:51 PM »
Snooks,

It almost sounds like she doesn't want "her little girls" to grow up and leave the nest.  I've met parents like this.  Heck, my beloved BIL would prefer that his daughter's not leave his home until they marry.  The oldest is in her early 30s and the youngest is in her late 20s.  He doesn't charge them anything for room and board, provides cars with insurance to them at no cost (he even pays for the gas), etc.  Plus, he doesn't try to control them with the purse strings, so he's likely to get his wish.  They are smart girls; Why would they leave such a cozy nest?  I can't imagine why a scout leader would not want her scouts to move up to the next level.  Doesn't she have more young girls coming in?  Does she like the older girls more?  How can she lead both her current group of young girls AND an older group of "helpers"?  Does she have no other commitments in her life?  Or is she just an exceedingly controlling person?  If so, I would think the older girls would be happy to move up to the next level with increased independence appropriate to that age group.

Good luck,
MK

I've met a woman who finally moved out of the family home and got a job AFTER her father died (older parents when they had an only child, I think).  Never seriously dated, from what she's said.  She was in her late thirties or early forties when Daddy passed away...no job, no schooling since high school, and no experience in running her own life. 

Makes you want to go back in time and shake some sense into her parents...or encourage her to step out on her own twenty-odd years earlier...
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?

cwm

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4691 on: October 09, 2013, 03:00:28 PM »
Snooks,

It almost sounds like she doesn't want "her little girls" to grow up and leave the nest.  I've met parents like this.  Heck, my beloved BIL would prefer that his daughter's not leave his home until they marry.  The oldest is in her early 30s and the youngest is in her late 20s.  He doesn't charge them anything for room and board, provides cars with insurance to them at no cost (he even pays for the gas), etc.  Plus, he doesn't try to control them with the purse strings, so he's likely to get his wish.  They are smart girls; Why would they leave such a cozy nest?  I can't imagine why a scout leader would not want her scouts to move up to the next level.  Doesn't she have more young girls coming in?  Does she like the older girls more?  How can she lead both her current group of young girls AND an older group of "helpers"?  Does she have no other commitments in her life?  Or is she just an exceedingly controlling person?  If so, I would think the older girls would be happy to move up to the next level with increased independence appropriate to that age group.

Good luck,
MK

I've met a woman who finally moved out of the family home and got a job AFTER her father died (older parents when they had an only child, I think).  Never seriously dated, from what she's said.  She was in her late thirties or early forties when Daddy passed away...no job, no schooling since high school, and no experience in running her own life. 

Makes you want to go back in time and shake some sense into her parents...or encourage her to step out on her own twenty-odd years earlier...

One of my dad's cousins still lives at home with his mother. He's well into his 50s. He's dated, but nothing serious, and he's never married. His brother moved out and got married, now lives a block and a half away. In a way it's kind of nice, Great Aunt doesn't have to move into a home even though she's older and has a hard time on her own, but it's not the type of situation I'd ever like to find myself in. The only time he's lived away from the home was when he was in college.

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4692 on: October 09, 2013, 03:01:16 PM »
I've met a woman who finally moved out of the family home and got a job AFTER her father died (older parents when they had an only child, I think).  Never seriously dated, from what she's said.  She was in her late thirties or early forties when Daddy passed away...no job, no schooling since high school, and no experience in running her own life. 

Makes you want to go back in time and shake some sense into her parents...or encourage her to step out on her own twenty-odd years earlier...

Ahhh, you met my step sister!  Seriously, after her son was born her husband went off the deep end and was beating her (or threatening to, not sure which) My Dad has no qualms about going over, taking her and the baby back to his house and paid for her to divorce the lowlife.   Since then, I believe she has lived on her own less than 2 years total (2-3 short spurts, always moved back home) Her son graduated from High School last June.

Gee and they wonder why I rarely go visit.

jmarvellous

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4693 on: October 09, 2013, 03:05:37 PM »
I've met a woman who finally moved out of the family home and got a job AFTER her father died (older parents when they had an only child, I think).  Never seriously dated, from what she's said.  She was in her late thirties or early forties when Daddy passed away...no job, no schooling since high school, and no experience in running her own life. 

Makes you want to go back in time and shake some sense into her parents...or encourage her to step out on her own twenty-odd years earlier...

Ahhh, you met my step sister!  Seriously, after her son was born her husband went off the deep end and was beating her (or threatening to, not sure which) My Dad has no qualms about going over, taking her and the baby back to his house and paid for her to divorce the lowlife.   Since then, I believe she has lived on her own less than 2 years total (2-3 short spurts, always moved back home) Her son graduated from High School last June.

Gee and they wonder why I rarely go visit.

I'm sure I must be confused here. You don't visit your father and stepsister because she was being abused and your father helped her out?

weeblewobble

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4694 on: October 09, 2013, 03:09:35 PM »
Mommy called her in sick?  In our personnel policy, it expressly states that you have to call in yourself unless you are physically incapable.  And they mean it: you better be out cold or in a med evac helicoptor.

My mother called in sick for me once.  I had a vent tube down my throat at the time. I thought that was a pretty good reason to have somebody else call my boss.

My husband called in sick for me once ... I was having contractions at the time and didn't think it would be nice to pant and curse into the phone while talking to my boss.