News: IMPORTANT UPDATE REGARDING SITE IN FORUM ANNOUNCEMENT FOLDER.

  • May 20, 2018, 10:40:03 PM

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74  (Read 4284122 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

jedikaiti

  • Swiss Army Nerd
  • Member
  • Posts: 2913
  • A pie in the hand is worth two in the mail.
Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4605 on: October 08, 2013, 09:06:23 PM »
Speaking of government employees, my father has a coworker who might not be trying to commit PD, but it sure looks odd.

Dad works for Large Government Organization, with a union. Said LGO and union have a VERY generous leave policy. As in, Dad has only been there for eight years and already has six or seven weeks of leave (sick and vacation) he can take every year. I can only imagine what the lifers have. Also, you can roll it over from year to year without issue, and can cash out up to six weeks when you retire as a nice going away present. Like I said, very generous.

Dad has a coworker who has been with the LGO for years longer than Dad. And this coworker uses up all of his sick and vacation time Every Single Year. Okay, that in and of itself isnít so bad. Itís his time, he can do with it what he will. But then he also take a few weeks of unpaid leave. To do things like a Bible camp with his children Ė a vacation, or at least something that can be accounted for a while in advance. This year, he has to have surgery. Itís September, heís already used up all his time. So instead of putting in for that unpaid leave like usual, he asks other employees to donate their time, b/c, you know, this was so unexpected (knee surgery, I think), and he canít handle this much time unpaid.

Dad declined donating time.

Update on this gem.

He's off for his surgery. People have donated time to him so he can continue to be paid. And what does he post to Facebook? How he's going on vacation. I'm sure the union will do nothing.

(I think this might irk dad even more than most b/c he specifically avoided going Out of State with Mom while he was out after knee surgery, not b/c he was physically unable, but b/c he was on workerís comp and didnít want to temp a fraud suit.)
Wait a gosh darned minute ... He's using donated sick leave to go on vacation?  "Go on vacation" as in "leave the area to have fun somewhere else"?  Forget about the union.  I don't think they fix this kind of stuff.  I think I would take a screen shot of that Facebook page in to HR and tell them I want my donated sick leave back since I donated it to this fool so he could have knee surgery, not so he could "recouperate" in Cabo San Lucas.

BINGO!
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

"The problem with re-examining your brilliant ideas is that more often than not, you discover they are the intellectual equivalent of saying, 'Hold my beer and watch this!'" - Cindy Couture

z_squared82

  • Member
  • Posts: 605
Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4606 on: October 09, 2013, 07:59:56 AM »
Speaking of government employees, my father has a coworker who might not be trying to commit PD, but it sure looks odd.

Dad works for Large Government Organization, with a union. Said LGO and union have a VERY generous leave policy. As in, Dad has only been there for eight years and already has six or seven weeks of leave (sick and vacation) he can take every year. I can only imagine what the lifers have. Also, you can roll it over from year to year without issue, and can cash out up to six weeks when you retire as a nice going away present. Like I said, very generous.

Dad has a coworker who has been with the LGO for years longer than Dad. And this coworker uses up all of his sick and vacation time Every Single Year. Okay, that in and of itself isnít so bad. Itís his time, he can do with it what he will. But then he also take a few weeks of unpaid leave. To do things like a Bible camp with his children Ė a vacation, or at least something that can be accounted for a while in advance. This year, he has to have surgery. Itís September, heís already used up all his time. So instead of putting in for that unpaid leave like usual, he asks other employees to donate their time, b/c, you know, this was so unexpected (knee surgery, I think), and he canít handle this much time unpaid.

Dad declined donating time.

Update on this gem.

He's off for his surgery. People have donated time to him so he can continue to be paid. And what does he post to Facebook? How he's going on vacation. I'm sure the union will do nothing.

(I think this might irk dad even more than most b/c he specifically avoided going Out of State with Mom while he was out after knee surgery, not b/c he was physically unable, but b/c he was on workerís comp and didnít want to temp a fraud suit.)
Wait a gosh darned minute ... He's using donated sick leave to go on vacation?  "Go on vacation" as in "leave the area to have fun somewhere else"?  Forget about the union.  I don't think they fix this kind of stuff.  I think I would take a screen shot of that Facebook page in to HR and tell them I want my donated sick leave back since I donated it to this fool so he could have knee surgery, not so he could "recouperate" in Cabo San Lucas.

BINGO!

Well, that'll be someone else's job. Dad didn't donate the time, nor does he have Facebook. He heard about the vacation post from a reliable coworker. I'm sure I'll hear more later.

nutraxfornerves

  • Member
  • Posts: 1785
Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4607 on: October 09, 2013, 10:13:35 AM »
Even if you are off-duty, as a police officer, it's not a good idea for you to join in when a bunch of motorcyclists attack an SUV. Bonus points if you lie to your superiors about you involvement.

NYPD detective faces charges after video shows he pounded on SUV

Nutrax
The plural of anecdote is not data

Snooks

  • Member
  • Posts: 2563
Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4608 on: October 09, 2013, 12:00:12 PM »
This isn't so much professional Darwinism but it's certainly a case of your previous behaviour biting you in the butt.

I'm involved in Girl Scouts.  The group I run is severely under subscribed mainly because the leader of the group that is supposed to feed in to ours refuses to help us by encouraging girls to move up once they reach the age they can join us, instead she gives them "helper" roles at her group.  We compromised and agreed only to run our meetings when her group isn't meeting (school holidays) so the girls could attend both groups.

At the beginning of this year (I know because it was raised at an area meeting) she told us she was running a trip just for the older girls to go to an activity center.  I was p*ssed because she'd basically run an activity that a) severely stepped into the area we're trying to grow and b) done it during school holidays and basically wiped out the chances of us meeting during that holiday.

The trip is in 2 weeks, so has been planned for 10 months.  Yesterday I got an email stating that they had agreed to take 15 girls which was more than she could take on her licence (licences are needed to run groups and are ratio-ed depending on the age group), could I help out?  I don't have a licence that allows me to take girls away, I honestly don't know if my licence could have let me help her out but it fell into the a lack of planning on your part does not constitute an emergency on mine.  If she'd been super helpful to me and really encouraged the girls to come to our meetings (which they do enjoy) or even bothered to respond to a single solitary email I've ever sent her I might have gone to our district leader and seen if I could help but her previous behaviour led to me responding "Sorry, don't have a licence also, this is very short notice".

You don't get to block us at every turn (including offering an enticing long distance trip to our girls at the end of one of our meetings i.e. she came in at the end of our meeting to hand out the letters for a trip which would have taken place in two years - clearly designed to keep the girls in her group for that long as they wouldn't have been able to go otherwise) and then expect help when you've over promised to them.

It's this sort of ridiculous behaviour and lack of support from above that makes me want to give up scouting.

Midnight Kitty

  • The Queen of Sludge
  • Member
  • Posts: 2310
    • The Stoddard's Hale
Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4609 on: October 09, 2013, 12:34:42 PM »
Snooks,

It almost sounds like she doesn't want "her little girls" to grow up and leave the nest.  I've met parents like this.  Heck, my beloved BIL would prefer that his daughter's not leave his home until they marry.  The oldest is in her early 30s and the youngest is in her late 20s.  He doesn't charge them anything for room and board, provides cars with insurance to them at no cost (he even pays for the gas), etc.  Plus, he doesn't try to control them with the purse strings, so he's likely to get his wish.  They are smart girls; Why would they leave such a cozy nest?  I can't imagine why a scout leader would not want her scouts to move up to the next level.  Doesn't she have more young girls coming in?  Does she like the older girls more?  How can she lead both her current group of young girls AND an older group of "helpers"?  Does she have no other commitments in her life?  Or is she just an exceedingly controlling person?  If so, I would think the older girls would be happy to move up to the next level with increased independence appropriate to that age group.

Good luck,
MK
"The first rule is to keep an untroubled spirit.  The second is to look things in the face and know them for what they are."

Marcus Aurelius

ladyknight1

  • Member
  • Posts: 12217
  • Not all those who wander are lost
Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4610 on: October 09, 2013, 12:40:41 PM »
As a Boy Scout volunteer, I get exactly what you are saying. I hope you can reach out to other volunteers and get away from the other leader.
ďAll that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

VorFemme

  • Member
  • Posts: 14035
  • It's too darned hot! (song from Kiss Me, Kate)
Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4611 on: October 09, 2013, 01:51:51 PM »
Snooks,

It almost sounds like she doesn't want "her little girls" to grow up and leave the nest.  I've met parents like this.  Heck, my beloved BIL would prefer that his daughter's not leave his home until they marry.  The oldest is in her early 30s and the youngest is in her late 20s.  He doesn't charge them anything for room and board, provides cars with insurance to them at no cost (he even pays for the gas), etc.  Plus, he doesn't try to control them with the purse strings, so he's likely to get his wish.  They are smart girls; Why would they leave such a cozy nest?  I can't imagine why a scout leader would not want her scouts to move up to the next level.  Doesn't she have more young girls coming in?  Does she like the older girls more?  How can she lead both her current group of young girls AND an older group of "helpers"?  Does she have no other commitments in her life?  Or is she just an exceedingly controlling person?  If so, I would think the older girls would be happy to move up to the next level with increased independence appropriate to that age group.

Good luck,
MK

I've met a woman who finally moved out of the family home and got a job AFTER her father died (older parents when they had an only child, I think).  Never seriously dated, from what she's said.  She was in her late thirties or early forties when Daddy passed away...no job, no schooling since high school, and no experience in running her own life. 

Makes you want to go back in time and shake some sense into her parents...or encourage her to step out on her own twenty-odd years earlier...
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I explain?

cwm

  • Member
  • Posts: 2337
Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4612 on: October 09, 2013, 02:00:28 PM »
Snooks,

It almost sounds like she doesn't want "her little girls" to grow up and leave the nest.  I've met parents like this.  Heck, my beloved BIL would prefer that his daughter's not leave his home until they marry.  The oldest is in her early 30s and the youngest is in her late 20s.  He doesn't charge them anything for room and board, provides cars with insurance to them at no cost (he even pays for the gas), etc.  Plus, he doesn't try to control them with the purse strings, so he's likely to get his wish.  They are smart girls; Why would they leave such a cozy nest?  I can't imagine why a scout leader would not want her scouts to move up to the next level.  Doesn't she have more young girls coming in?  Does she like the older girls more?  How can she lead both her current group of young girls AND an older group of "helpers"?  Does she have no other commitments in her life?  Or is she just an exceedingly controlling person?  If so, I would think the older girls would be happy to move up to the next level with increased independence appropriate to that age group.

Good luck,
MK

I've met a woman who finally moved out of the family home and got a job AFTER her father died (older parents when they had an only child, I think).  Never seriously dated, from what she's said.  She was in her late thirties or early forties when Daddy passed away...no job, no schooling since high school, and no experience in running her own life. 

Makes you want to go back in time and shake some sense into her parents...or encourage her to step out on her own twenty-odd years earlier...

One of my dad's cousins still lives at home with his mother. He's well into his 50s. He's dated, but nothing serious, and he's never married. His brother moved out and got married, now lives a block and a half away. In a way it's kind of nice, Great Aunt doesn't have to move into a home even though she's older and has a hard time on her own, but it's not the type of situation I'd ever like to find myself in. The only time he's lived away from the home was when he was in college.

Wulfie

  • Member
  • Posts: 2118
  • I'm so pretty! Oh so pretty! - Morgan the Cat
    • Unique Weddings for Unique Couples
Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4613 on: October 09, 2013, 02:01:16 PM »
I've met a woman who finally moved out of the family home and got a job AFTER her father died (older parents when they had an only child, I think).  Never seriously dated, from what she's said.  She was in her late thirties or early forties when Daddy passed away...no job, no schooling since high school, and no experience in running her own life. 

Makes you want to go back in time and shake some sense into her parents...or encourage her to step out on her own twenty-odd years earlier...

Ahhh, you met my step sister!  Seriously, after her son was born her husband went off the deep end and was beating her (or threatening to, not sure which) My Dad has no qualms about going over, taking her and the baby back to his house and paid for her to divorce the lowlife.   Since then, I believe she has lived on her own less than 2 years total (2-3 short spurts, always moved back home) Her son graduated from High School last June.

Gee and they wonder why I rarely go visit.

#borecore

  • Member
  • Posts: 5279
  • Extreme normcore
Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4614 on: October 09, 2013, 02:05:37 PM »
I've met a woman who finally moved out of the family home and got a job AFTER her father died (older parents when they had an only child, I think).  Never seriously dated, from what she's said.  She was in her late thirties or early forties when Daddy passed away...no job, no schooling since high school, and no experience in running her own life. 

Makes you want to go back in time and shake some sense into her parents...or encourage her to step out on her own twenty-odd years earlier...

Ahhh, you met my step sister!  Seriously, after her son was born her husband went off the deep end and was beating her (or threatening to, not sure which) My Dad has no qualms about going over, taking her and the baby back to his house and paid for her to divorce the lowlife.   Since then, I believe she has lived on her own less than 2 years total (2-3 short spurts, always moved back home) Her son graduated from High School last June.

Gee and they wonder why I rarely go visit.

I'm sure I must be confused here. You don't visit your father and stepsister because she was being abused and your father helped her out?

weeblewobble

  • Member
  • Posts: 2648
Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4615 on: October 09, 2013, 02:09:35 PM »
Mommy called her in sick?  In our personnel policy, it expressly states that you have to call in yourself unless you are physically incapable.  And they mean it: you better be out cold or in a med evac helicoptor.

My mother called in sick for me once.  I had a vent tube down my throat at the time. I thought that was a pretty good reason to have somebody else call my boss.

My husband called in sick for me once ... I was having contractions at the time and didn't think it would be nice to pant and curse into the phone while talking to my boss.

Wulfie

  • Member
  • Posts: 2118
  • I'm so pretty! Oh so pretty! - Morgan the Cat
    • Unique Weddings for Unique Couples
Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4616 on: October 09, 2013, 02:22:48 PM »
Ahhh, you met my step sister!  Seriously, after her son was born her husband went off the deep end and was beating her (or threatening to, not sure which) My Dad has no qualms about going over, taking her and the baby back to his house and paid for her to divorce the lowlife.   Since then, I believe she has lived on her own less than 2 years total (2-3 short spurts, always moved back home) Her son graduated from High School last June.

Gee and they wonder why I rarely go visit.

I'm sure I must be confused here. You don't visit your father and stepsister because she was being abused and your father helped her out?
[/quote]

No, because once she moved home with them she saps off of them and expected them to raise her son. She has lived with them and they have supported her for nearly 18 years. The only times she has moved out was when she moved in with a boyfriend. Once she figured out that they expected her to be an adult, she broke up with them and moved back with Dad and my step mom. It is hard to watch because even when the rest of the family has tried to intervene she starts the waterworks about how hard it is to support a child and how we don't understand.

I know that Dad and SM are letting her be this way but it is not something I can stand seeing.

Snooks

  • Member
  • Posts: 2563
Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4617 on: October 09, 2013, 02:35:41 PM »
Snooks,

It almost sounds like she doesn't want "her little girls" to grow up and leave the nest.  I've met parents like this.  Heck, my beloved BIL would prefer that his daughter's not leave his home until they marry.  The oldest is in her early 30s and the youngest is in her late 20s.  He doesn't charge them anything for room and board, provides cars with insurance to them at no cost (he even pays for the gas), etc.  Plus, he doesn't try to control them with the purse strings, so he's likely to get his wish.  They are smart girls; Why would they leave such a cozy nest?  I can't imagine why a scout leader would not want her scouts to move up to the next level.  Doesn't she have more young girls coming in?  Does she like the older girls more?  How can she lead both her current group of young girls AND an older group of "helpers"?  Does she have no other commitments in her life?  Or is she just an exceedingly controlling person?  If so, I would think the older girls would be happy to move up to the next level with increased independence appropriate to that age group.

Good luck,
MK

She does have younger girls coming in, hence why she needs all the "helpers".  I once asked one of them how they "help" she said they do the washing up after the drinks.  The leader claims they pair up and help with a patrol each.  I suspect the truth is somewhere between the two.  I can't do anything to force them, she needs to gently nudge them towards us but she won't.  There used to be a regulation about how many "helpers" they could have but it seems to have disappeared out of the guidelines so senior people can't do much either.

goldilocks

  • Member
  • Posts: 865
Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4618 on: October 09, 2013, 04:33:59 PM »
One of my friends attempted to commit PD for her husband.   Fortunately she told me her plans first and I was able to stop her!

Husband had a job with the company of Top Manager.   His bonus for being top manager was $100 per quarter (just an example, I don't really know what it was).  AFter the end of the quarter, he asked to be demoted to Less than Top Manager, which had a bonus of $50 per quarter.   So, when his bonus came, (for the quarter in which he was Top Manager), it was only $50.

Friend was highly irate and was going to call his boss and complain.  I managed to stop her before she completely ruined her husbands career, as well as make him the laughinstock of the company.

andi

  • Member
  • Posts: 2502
Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #4619 on: October 09, 2013, 07:01:09 PM »
This just happened at my store - we hired a person who wanted a job with us because the hours were flexible and there was growth potential of you worked hard. He had a new family and the job security with us was better than his part time gig.  Well- he calls in one night and tells his department manager "I can't come in tonight, my other job called and I can make double there than I can here".

Manager told him he needed to talk to him next time he came in.  Never came back.