Author Topic: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74  (Read 1081915 times)

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figee

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5190 on: December 23, 2013, 06:44:47 PM »
I think some smells are stronger for some people than they are for others or they smell different.  So I find tuna awful and stinky, but mackerel is worse.  Sadly, DH and all three dogs adore the smell and the taste.  A bit like tastes of food:  I can't stand spaghetti bolognaise because of the smell and the texture of tomato and mince.  Lasagna is also problematic unless it is vegetarian.  DH on the other hand can't stand the smell of mangoes, the taste or smell of pumpkin and so on.

greencat

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5191 on: December 23, 2013, 06:55:25 PM »
I think some smells are stronger for some people than they are for others or they smell different.  So I find tuna awful and stinky, but mackerel is worse.  Sadly, DH and all three dogs adore the smell and the taste.  A bit like tastes of food:  I can't stand spaghetti bolognaise because of the smell and the texture of tomato and mince.  Lasagna is also problematic unless it is vegetarian.  DH on the other hand can't stand the smell of mangoes, the taste or smell of pumpkin and so on.

I also can't stand tomato-based pasta sauce and ground beef together!  It is specifically the ground beef though - I've had it with ground turkey or ground pork (or sausage made from either of those meats) and not been bothered. 

Most commercial canned tuna does have a very strong odor - especially if you stir it up to mix with mayo for tuna salad. 

I'm kind of craving tuna salad right now...

Dazi

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5192 on: December 23, 2013, 07:52:33 PM »
Funny, tuna smell from a can doesn't bother me in the slightest (with the exception of Bumble Bee tuna because it smells and taste like rancid crabmeat to me).  Salmon I find revolting smelling in all it's forms.  Sardines I'm fine with, but mackerel and anchovies stink something awful.

Even though I am a super smeller, I can usually deal with someone else eating cold fish out of a can/tin, but please deity, do not microwave fish of any kind at work.  It's worse than the super burnt popcorn or toast.
Meditate. Live purely. Quiet the mind. Do your work with mastery. Like the moon, come out from behind the clouds! Shine. ---Gautama Buddah





Julian

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5193 on: December 23, 2013, 08:10:55 PM »
We have a sandwich toaster in our miniscule office kitchen. 

An email went around last week - 'cleaners found the sandwich toaster left on overnight, and it was very hot!  Don't do this again!' 

Fair enough, it's dangerous to leave appliances on like that.

Then came the follow-up email from another staff member.  'Not only was the toaster on and hot, but somebody left teabags sitting on it.'

Who the heck leaves a fuel source on top of a heat source??? 

Now everyone's probably wondering who the office arsonist is...

greencat

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5194 on: December 23, 2013, 08:31:27 PM »
A new staff member in my office tried to heat up a boxed personal-sized pizza in the toaster oven...in the cardboard box.  The office smelled like burned stuff for a few days.

He didn't get why you can't do that in a toaster oven...and really shouldn't do it in a conventional oven either!

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5195 on: December 23, 2013, 09:11:54 PM »
Two agents caught playing scrabble in a listed home

http://tinyurl.com/nrt32s4

Apparently they out the price up so they could use it.

Winterlight

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5196 on: December 24, 2013, 09:01:10 AM »
I don't remember the name of the woman, but over the weekend I saw a story on the news about a woman going to South Africa tweeting some stupid racist comment.  By the time she arrived in S.A., the tweet went viral.  Even deleting it and her profile didn't save her job.  Ironically, she works (or at least she used to work) in Public Relations.  :o

Justine Sacco

That was some impressively high-speed Darwinism.
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magicdomino

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5197 on: December 24, 2013, 11:11:36 AM »
We have a sandwich toaster in our miniscule office kitchen. 

An email went around last week - 'cleaners found the sandwich toaster left on overnight, and it was very hot!  Don't do this again!' 

Fair enough, it's dangerous to leave appliances on like that.

Then came the follow-up email from another staff member.  'Not only was the toaster on and hot, but somebody left teabags sitting on it.'

Who the heck leaves a fuel source on top of a heat source??? 

Now everyone's probably wondering who the office arsonist is...

The owners of our building have forbidden toaster ovens, precisely because someone left a toaster oven on and caused a fire.  Newer toaster ovens have automatic cut-offs, but office ovens may be donated older models.

Midnight Kitty

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5198 on: December 24, 2013, 02:32:49 PM »
The previously mention PD candidate is out today on leave.  She requested leave from her supervisor last week.  I only know because I heard them yelling at each other in the front office.  Her supervisor told her "No. You can't take off Christmas Eve; You are the only front office staff scheduled to work Christmas Eve."  When it comes to taking leave, it's first come, first served.  We have to have someone present from each section during work hours.  Yesterday PD-Wannabee asked the guy filling in for the manager (also out on leave this week) if she could take leave today.  Temporary Manager didn't even ask if the Clerical section would have coverage; He just said OK.  He's noodle-spined.  This morning he says he will not be in the office most of the day.

This morning I am acting Branch Manager and this afternoon I will be acting Receptionist. ::)
"The first rule is to keep an untroubled spirit.  The second is to look things in the face and know them for what they are."

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Snooks

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5199 on: December 24, 2013, 04:59:00 PM »
My entire office may have committed PD today as we all disappeared to the pub at 12.30 because there was no manager to send out the "go home" email.

jedikaiti

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5200 on: December 24, 2013, 07:27:24 PM »
The previously mention PD candidate is out today on leave.  She requested leave from her supervisor last week.  I only know because I heard them yelling at each other in the front office.  Her supervisor told her "No. You can't take off Christmas Eve; You are the only front office staff scheduled to work Christmas Eve."  When it comes to taking leave, it's first come, first served.  We have to have someone present from each section during work hours.  Yesterday PD-Wannabee asked the guy filling in for the manager (also out on leave this week) if she could take leave today.  Temporary Manager didn't even ask if the Clerical section would have coverage; He just said OK.  He's noodle-spined.  This morning he says he will not be in the office most of the day.

This morning I am acting Branch Manager and this afternoon I will be acting Receptionist. ::)

A Christmas Eve PD-attempt Two-Fer!
"The problem with re-examining your brilliant ideas is that more often than not, you discover they are the intellectual equivalent of saying, 'Hold my beer and watch this!'" - Cindy Couture

siamesecat2965

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5201 on: December 25, 2013, 11:47:57 AM »
I don't remember the name of the woman, but over the weekend I saw a story on the news about a woman going to South Africa tweeting some stupid racist comment.  By the time she arrived in S.A., the tweet went viral.  Even deleting it and her profile didn't save her job.  Ironically, she works (or at least she used to work) in Public Relations.  :o

Justine Sacco



That was some impressively high-speed Darwinism.

It was indeed. But kudos to her employer for not putting up with what she did and taking swift action.

BabyMama

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5202 on: December 26, 2013, 08:33:14 PM »
My coworker Sherri took a FOUR HOUR lunch break today. She showed up at 8:45 (is supposed to be in at 8 every day, but we have a flexible workplace so it's not a "huge" deal), chatted with a couple people for another 45 minutes, and then went, "Tee hee, I should probably turn on my computer!"

She mentioned to another coworker who sits nearby, Jim, that a friend was unexpectedly in town for the day, and they were meeting for lunch. She said something like, "This seems like a good day for a two hour lunch, wink wink nudge nudge." And, in theory, it is. There were like 5 people in an office that usually has ~40 people, and there were no managers in today. Nothing has urgency, since nobody is around to approve anything, and we have pretty flex schedules, so yeah, if you happened to take a two hour lunch when you normally don't, then nobody would probably notice, or at least not hold it against you. Not saying one should, but...yeah. It wouldn't be unheard of. And the expectation that you make up that time is pretty clear.

Sherri left for lunch at about 11:30. I stopped by Jim's desk to drop off some work around 3:15, and Sherri's computer was in sleep mode. Jim mentioned that she hadn't come back from lunch yet, and gathered that she wasn't coming back for the day. He also mentioned that sometimes, if he he goes to the bathroom before leaving work and comes back, he'll see that Sherri has gone home, assuming Jim has gone and that nobody will notice she has left. (Jim works 8 hours and leaves at 3:30. Sherri, who should start work at 8 but usually comes in at 9, and also takes longer-than-an-hour lunches, should have no reason to be leaving at 3:30 too.)

I went back to my desk at 3:25, and saw Sherri coming in the door. Apparently when Jim left a few minutes later, he threw out a, "Have a good night," and Sherri said, "You too!" and winked, which really annoyed Jim, who felt it was like a, "It's our little secret!" wink. We both wonder how long Sherri actually stayed. Did she wait until Jim's car was out of the parking lot?

They do not share the same supervisor so Jim doesn't feel it's his place to say anything to Sherri's boss. Also, Sherri is BFFs with her boss's boss. And it's very, very difficult to get people fired at our workplace, since it's nearly impossible to get anyone to take their place due to bureaucratic red tape and no managers want to deal with it.

onikenbai

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5203 on: December 26, 2013, 11:16:02 PM »
My coworker Sherri took a FOUR HOUR lunch break today. She showed up at 8:45 (is supposed to be in at 8 every day, but we have a flexible workplace so it's not a "huge" deal), chatted with a couple people for another 45 minutes, and then went, "Tee hee, I should probably turn on my computer!"

Don't you have to account for what you're doing all day?  I work in a consulting office and every second of my day has to be accounted for either under a project number that is directly billed to the client, or under non-chargeable hours, in which case I have to document specifically what I am doing.  My chargeability rate is monitored and if it drops below a certain point without good reason, the company figures they don't really need me and I'm fired.  Depending on the situation, I could take a four hour lunch, but there had better not be 8 hours on my timesheet for the day unless I slaved long into the night or used vacation hours to compensate.  Otherwise I would be instantly fired for fraud.  Nobody in my office wants to stand around for 45 minutes and chat because that can't go on your timesheet under anything, unless you're having a technical discussion over how to solve a project-related problem.  Chatting about the weather just means everybody in the discussion has to work later to compensate for the frivolous chat.  5 minutes, cool.  45 minutes, so not.  Your co-worker would not last around my office.

BabyMama

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #5204 on: December 27, 2013, 08:28:37 AM »
No. We used to have a time tracking program, but what we do is so varied and there are so many small pieces that it became a hassle to continue it. (Although Jim's department now uses a similar, but different program, the department Sherri and I work under is not required to use it.) Basically if you meet your deadlines, nobody really cares what you do in between. The problem is that there's no way to quality check one's work, so if someone does a shoddy job and that person's manager doesn't notice (and, with how busy we all are now, they might not have time to delve too deeply into that) and they get the shoddy work done on time, then they get away with it.

We had an employee who worked here for ~10 years who worked in a remote office and turned out terrible work for years, but her manager protected her (and again, hard to get fired since managers know it could be two years before that person gets replaced.) Her excuses just kept getting more and more ridiculous, and she was finally let go, but in a mass layoff and her name was just casually mentioned in the company memo--they fibbed and said her position was redundant, which wasn't true but they didn't want to say, "X sucks, so we're firing her." It wasn't the wisest move, as some other remote employees with the same job title who didn't know X was a bad worker called in, freaked, thinking they were redundant too.

There are lots of hard workers here, and people dedicated to their jobs who do wonderful work. However, there are one or two people who have figured out they're riding the gravy train and there are no conductors aboard.  ::)