Author Topic: Home Buying Etiquette  (Read 17270 times)

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Snowy Owl

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #15 on: March 17, 2010, 04:33:55 PM »
Sigh. Another one.

When you are showing a home, don't just walk right in. Knock first, please. Or ring the bell. But we do still live here.

Agreed.  I think I'd say the main thing for the agent is to try and give as much notice as possible of a visit, for the owner / tenant to realise that this may on occasion need to be less than would be preferred, and for the agent never to turn up and let themselves in with no notice and no knocking / doorbell. 
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veryfluffy

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #16 on: March 17, 2010, 05:05:09 PM »
1. When viewing a property, do not assume that your dog is also welcome to come in with you. I understand that your dog will need to like the home you are buying and might have an opinion, but maybe you know him well enough by now to figure out his preference. Or take photos and show them to him later. Take a picture of my cats, while you are at it, so you can explain why he couldn't come in.

2. If you are arranging to view a property, please at least take a look at the estate agent's details first. Yes, it only has two bedrooms and one bathroom. Maybe even look at a map to see if the house is in an area you are willing to move to -- yes, this one IS rather close to the railway tracks, which shouldn't have come as a surprise. Price may be negotiable. Size and location are generally pretty well fixed. Please just consider that the homeowner is preparing for each viewing, and if there isn't even the remotest chance that you are going to be interested, it is rude to put them to the trouble.
   

Mopsy428

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #17 on: September 05, 2010, 09:12:06 PM »
You are in control of your lawyer therefore it is *your* fault if you lawyers haven't drawn up agreements etc. Please bear in mind deadlines for entry dates etc. may impact on your buyer's ability to purchase. 
It's not your fault if your lawyer hasn't drawn up agreements unless you completely leave the lawyer in the dark, but please be advised that if your lawyer hasn't done his/her work, it's your lawyer's fault, not the buyer's/seller's.

Mopsy428

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #18 on: September 05, 2010, 09:43:41 PM »
For realtors:

*When someone schedules a showing for one of your properties, let the tenants know so that the viewing realtor and prospective buyers don't walk into a home on the poor, unprepared tenants!  It's scary for the tenant, embarrassing for everyone else, and NOT a good way to make a sale.  (No, we most definitely did NOT buy that house!  We never even saw past the front door.)

To add to this, if you do NOT call, do not be surprised if the tenant refuses to let you in until he/she is ready. If it's really late at night, be prepared to have to reschedule or come back at another time.

If you are showing the rental space to a prospective tenant and have someone else showing the place for you, you NEED to let the tenant know WHO that person will be. Otherwise, do not throw a fit if the tenant refuses to let your agent in. For all the tenant knows, these people could be rapists or murderers or burglars attempting to gain access to your house.

(Yes, I speak from personal experience. I had an inside bolt, and I was in the bathroom around 9:30 PM. Someone who was working for the landlord tried to open the door. This person didn't speak English, and let's just say the police were involved, and it made for a very, very long night.)

dawnfire

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #19 on: January 02, 2011, 11:30:36 AM »
Prospective tenants:
make sure your realtor knows if you or your family have any special needs. We were vacating a townhouse (double story with the bedrooms upstairs and the living areas downstairs)) and a realtor bought a family through with a son in a wheelchair. The poor boy had to be carried into the house just for the parents to inspect it.

DangerMouth

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #20 on: January 02, 2011, 11:55:59 AM »
Prospective tenants:
make sure your realtor knows if you or your family have any special needs. We were vacating a townhouse (double story with the bedrooms upstairs and the living areas downstairs)) and a realtor bought a family through with a son in a wheelchair. The poor boy had to be carried into the house just for the parents to inspect it.

They must have been expecting that though, and knew they'd have to carry the boy ahead of time. It's not like you could have installed a ramp or elevator even if you had known. Unless this was a case where they had said 'we are only interested in single floor units' and the agent ignored that and brought them to see your place anyway, in which case there was no point of them even getting out of the car.

How old was the boy?

geordicat

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #21 on: January 02, 2011, 12:25:25 PM »
*Please honor the 24hr notice for scheduling viewing appointments. One should not just drive buy and call the realitor and ask to see the house that night...with 20 minutes notice.

*If you do schedule the viewing, at least go in and look at the house! Yes this house you are looking at is "way out in the country"...you should have known that when scheduling a viewing. If you are not sure whether or not you'd like to see the house, make a drive-by to see where the house is located.

*If for any reason you cannot attend the viewing YOU scheduled, please call your realitor and re-schedule or cancel the showing.

ginlyn

In my experience, the 24-hour-notice requirement generally means that the property is a rental.  And, in this area anyway, the requirement is there because the landlord must give 24 hours of notice if needing to enter the property unless it's an emergency - even if it's the realtor who will be entering rather than the landlord.

Of course, vendors can put all the conditions that they want on the contract and realtors must honour them.  However, they need to realize that by doing so, they are making their property less accessible to the market.  It's not unusual for people to suddenly have to find a house (maybe they were transferred and the company is paying for one weekend of house-hunting in New Town).  24 hour notice just might not be possible for all the properties that they would like to view.  In a hot market, a 24 hour requirement from the vendor might be fine, but in a slow market it could mean that the house stays on the market for months.

So, if vendors want a reasonably-quick sale, they might have to be agreeable to getting phone calls from realtors "I'm bringing some people over in a half hour, okay?"  Yes, it means keeping the house in near-pristine condition at all time, doing a quick tidy-up and vacating the premises.  Almost all realtors around here seem to request that the residents not be there, if at all possible.  Overall - selling a house is not fun.

I understand the 24 hours notice now.   For the past 2 years my landlady has put this house on the market, and told us we'd get 24 hours notice.  Last year I negotiated 48 hours notice with the agents, but they backed out and the neighbors only (this is a duplex) they were changing it to 24 hours.  I was never notified of the change.

I am concerned she will put the house on the market AGAIN this summer, so that means we live on '24 hour standby' that someone can just come by and look around the house that I really had no plans on moving out of.  She keeps putting it on the market as a rental, but sheesh.  She puts it on the market for the summer.

So far nobody has come inside, but we get PLENTY of people poking around the property, which is unsettling to say the least! 
Light travels faster than sound.  That's why some people appear bright until they open their mouth.

Lisbeth

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #22 on: January 02, 2011, 01:00:42 PM »
Do not "make yourself comfortable" and stay longer than it takes to see what there is to see.

The home isn't yours until all the paperwork is signed and filed, and until then, it still belongs to the sellers.
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boxy

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #23 on: January 02, 2011, 02:33:12 PM »
Please moderate your use of perfume.  Some homeowners/renters are allergic to any kind of floral chemical smell.  

If you smell bad enough you have to bathe in perfume then perhaps you should wipe whatever that stuff is off your feet, or see a dentist and fix your rotten smelly teeth, or see a physician and fix those nasty sores, or try this new over-the-counter remedy from your local drugstore called deodorant.  

Not trying to be hard nosed, but honestly, most of us out here don't need you to share your eau-de-toilet with us.  

DangerMouth

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #24 on: January 03, 2011, 01:40:59 PM »
Please moderate your use of perfume.  Some homeowners/renters are allergic to any kind of floral chemical smell.  

If you smell bad enough you have to bathe in perfume then perhaps you should wipe whatever that stuff is off your feet, or see a dentist and fix your rotten smelly teeth, or see a physician and fix those nasty sores, or try this new over-the-counter remedy from your local drugstore called deodorant.  

Not trying to be hard nosed, but honestly, most of us out here don't need you to share your eau-de-toilet with us.  

Was all that snark really necessary?

Larrabee

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #25 on: January 03, 2011, 01:48:17 PM »
Even if the current decor of the house isn't to your taste and you would probably redecorate immediately, there's no need to comment loudly in front of the current owners about how awful it is. 

If you are selling a house, please try to leave it in a reasonable state when you vacate, arriving to find a fridge with 2 inches of mould on every surface isn't very pleasant.

In the UK, tenants are not obliged to allow any viewings of their rented home at all if they do not wish to.

boxy

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #26 on: January 03, 2011, 03:03:59 PM »
Snark?  Interesting assumption.  More like personal experience from being overwhelmed by people who want to share their perfume with 100 other people on a cramped commuter-rail car.  Day after day.  Then to be living in a house that is currently on the market and have strangers bring their florals into my house?  I'd really rather they not.  But snarky?  No, not intentionally. 

DangerMouth

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #27 on: January 03, 2011, 05:49:20 PM »
Snark?  Interesting assumption.  More like personal experience from being overwhelmed by people who want to share their perfume with 100 other people on a cramped commuter-rail car.  Day after day.  Then to be living in a house that is currently on the market and have strangers bring their florals into my house?  I'd really rather they not.  But snarky?  No, not intentionally.  

If you smell bad enough you have to bathe in perfume then perhaps you should wipe whatever that stuff is off your feet, or see a dentist and fix your rotten smelly teeth, or see a physician and fix those nasty sores, or try this new over-the-counter remedy from your local drugstore called deodorant.  

Snark and sarcasm. Sounded pretty intentional to me.

That could easily have been worded as "Remember that some people are allegic/sensitive to scets and perfumes, so it's best not to asphixiate them if there's the slightest chance you'll be doing business with them" without all the graphic desriptions.

boxy

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #28 on: January 03, 2011, 09:21:09 PM »
I'm snarky?

Returning to the intent of this thread, another etiquette point would be to please make sure the door is firmly shut when you leave so the heater doesn't try to heat the front porch.   ::)

kareng57

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #29 on: January 03, 2011, 10:07:25 PM »
I'm snarky?

Returning to the intent of this thread, another etiquette point would be to please make sure the door is firmly shut when you leave so the heater doesn't try to heat the front porch.   ::)


I agree with DangerMouth, your post was terribly inflammatory.  You could have gotten across your concern re odours with much nicer words.

It seems that you haven't been on this forum long -  perhaps you need to sit back and see how most of us communicate.