Author Topic: Home Buying Etiquette  (Read 15678 times)

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jedikaiti

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #60 on: January 05, 2014, 10:39:53 PM »
Having recently bought in the US, I would not DREAM of not having a my own buyer's agent. If that agent happened to have a house I liked for sale at the time, and I trusted them to handle the deal responsibly, that's fine. But I would not do a real estate purchase (or sale) without my own agent. If I found a FSBO I liked that wouldn't work with my realtor, well... too bad.
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

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GreenEyedHawk

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #61 on: January 05, 2014, 10:40:35 PM »
When I helped a friend who was looking at houses, one place he looked at (and ultimately ended up buying) the  current owners stayed while we did the viewing, which was really uncomfortable and awkward feeling.  When my parents sold their place, we always went out when the listing agent called to arrange viewings.  We'd go to a movie or out for ice cream.  It was the agent working for my parents who escorted potential buyers.  As far as I know, this is standard for where I am.

One place I looked at was filled with junk.  It seemed to me that the previous owner had passed away in the house and it was listed for cheap to move it quickly so the family members (or whoever) ended up having to settle these affairs wouldn't have to clean it out.  It made it a lot harder to get a feel for the place, its structural soundness or what needed repair because I could barely get near the walls and could hardly see the floors.  The decor was horrendously outdated and the place had not been properly cleaned in some time.  If you're going to sell a house, for heaven's sake, at least vacuum!  The  place had a horrid creepy vibe to it anyways and I decided I wasn't interested in seeing more after only being there about ten minutes.
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Morty'sCleaningLady

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #62 on: February 21, 2014, 10:45:53 AM »
I sold my last place and relocated, so I'm currently hunting.  I toured a place that I thought had a wonderful floor plan, a great yard, and was in a wonderful subdivision.  The problem -- the house had about 3 of those faux candle air fresheners in each room.  The realtor waxed poetically about the seller being so motivated.

As I toured the place, I realized that renters had trashed it and been evicted.  The range was missing burners.  The jetted tub was missing a panel on the side. The screened back door had been shredded.  The air fresheners were out to mask a smell.  Once my mom ran interference with the agent and I walked (alone) into the master bedroom closet, I realized the air fresheners were covering mold.  The house had been partially flooded.

It was an appropriate price if it was in normal move in condition (i.e. changing paint or replacing bathroom fixures with brushed nickel) but it was significantly over priced for all new flooring and potential wall board and structural integrity challenges.

If the seller is that motivated, instead of putting out her Costco lot of Renuzits (air fresheners), she could have painted the house cream, recarpeted and put burners on the range. 

I added up the work the house definitely needed and was looking at about $15,000 IF the electric or structural integrity wasn't compromised.  It just wasn't worth what the seller wanted it to be worth.
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Morty'sCleaningLady

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #63 on: February 21, 2014, 10:51:26 AM »
One more story!

Between selling and buying condos, I rented a first floor apartment in a 150 year old Victorian for 8 months.  (Odd time, but that was the lease.)  The landlords were a bit clueless, but they had found a phenomenal but pushy real estate rental agent.  In my lease, I had 24 hours notice before a showing.  As a full time worker with a stay at home dog, I needed to take care of Mort when people came through.

Well, the agent was taking to calling me at work to tell me that she was going to have a showing that afternoon.  Eek! 

I never successfully stopped the practice, but I stopped cleaning.  The realtor would do a once over of the apartment and fix whatever was out of place.  So, if she had a showing, she would have to make my bed and wash my breakfast dishes.  She also had to deal with Morty, who liked her, but was not a fan of everyone.  It reduced the lack of notice, but didn't stop the behavior all together.  (When I had my notice, the place was cleaned.)
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Amoreade

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #64 on: February 21, 2014, 11:16:46 AM »
When my parents were trying to sell their condo there was one realtor who was very flaky. She wouldn't call ahead of time or if she did she'd never show up. Her not calling stopped when she let herself into the condo and wandered into the master bedroom where my mom was sleeping absolutely naked.  It was an unfortunate occurrence but she always called after that (my mom thinks it's hilarious now but at the time...)

Cz. Burrito

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #65 on: February 21, 2014, 11:49:53 AM »
- don't try to become buddy-buddy with the seller and tell them how much marriage stinks and that you like to stay home and smoke weed while your husband travels for work.  (you wouldn't think that note would be necessary, but I was surprised....)

Wow, I think you sold a house to my boyfriend's ex-wife (and that's not all she was doing while he traveled for work).

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #66 on: March 04, 2014, 03:31:30 PM »
Now some of the remarks have me worried; we're going to be listing our house for sale very soon but instead of using a listing agent we're giving FSBO a try. Seeing as it's our house and we're the "seller's agent", we will be showing it ourselves and running open houses.

So, to those who have experienced this before (from either side, buyer or seller), what should we try to avoid? I'm already schooling my DH on not waxing poetic about the house and I'm in the midst of de-cluttering and scrubbing everything twice. I know there's one room I'm going to be apologizing for non-stop; my craft room. Sorry, but I still have a small business to run out of there, so it's not going to be perfect.
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TootsNYC

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #67 on: March 04, 2014, 03:51:23 PM »
Now some of the remarks have me worried; we're going to be listing our house for sale very soon but instead of using a listing agent we're giving FSBO a try. Seeing as it's our house and we're the "seller's agent", we will be showing it ourselves and running open houses.

So, to those who have experienced this before (from either side, buyer or seller), what should we try to avoid? I'm already schooling my DH on not waxing poetic about the house and I'm in the midst of de-cluttering and scrubbing everything twice. I know there's one room I'm going to be apologizing for non-stop; my craft room. Sorry, but I still have a small business to run out of there, so it's not going to be perfect.

Don't do that. Don't apologize for it. That will only draw people's attention to it.

Straighten it as best you can, and arrange things so that the room looks as big as it can. Maybe you need several matching storage containers that everything can go inside tidily during open houses.

Don't talk, period. Be as quiet as you can, and let people look. Be far enough away that they can talk about re-wallpapering, and the view, etc., without feeling that you're eavesdropping.

TeamBhakta

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #68 on: March 04, 2014, 03:55:28 PM »
I sold my last place and relocated, so I'm currently hunting.  I toured a place that I thought had a wonderful floor plan, a great yard, and was in a wonderful subdivision.  The problem -- the house had about 3 of those faux candle air fresheners in each room.  The realtor waxed poetically about the seller being so motivated.
....If the seller is that motivated, instead of putting out her Costco lot of Renuzits (air fresheners), she could have painted the house cream, recarpeted and put burners on the range. 

Shades of Kate Middleton there:
http://hollywoodlife.com/2011/07/20/kate-middleton-air-fresheners/

VorFemme

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #69 on: March 04, 2014, 04:18:20 PM »
We did a FSBO in 2005 through 2006, hired a real estate agent, fired her (first open house was the weekend that I traveled back to fire her), and finally sold it when the next door neighbor and our adult daughter living in the area got involved with getting it shown.

It took a while to get the minor repairs here & there done (before hiring the real estate agent) as there as a huge building boom in the area in 2005-2006 - contractors were much more interested in working for a contractor on several houses being built than a home owner of ONE house with a repair).

One open house that I had, I'd just unboxed a brand new printer, set it up to use, printed six flyers for the open house, gave them out, and went to print more...to find someone in the one family that showed up had taken the ink cartridges out of the printer...as the ONLY other people in the house for the last 24 hours, I was sure that it wasn't anyone else!

During one
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kareng57

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #70 on: March 05, 2014, 12:51:21 AM »
I sold my last place and relocated, so I'm currently hunting.  I toured a place that I thought had a wonderful floor plan, a great yard, and was in a wonderful subdivision.  The problem -- the house had about 3 of those faux candle air fresheners in each room.  The realtor waxed poetically about the seller being so motivated.
....If the seller is that motivated, instead of putting out her Costco lot of Renuzits (air fresheners), she could have painted the house cream, recarpeted and put burners on the range. 

Shades of Kate Middleton there:
http://hollywoodlife.com/2011/07/20/kate-middleton-air-fresheners/


I think that "appealing scents" is something that could quickly backfire.  Scents are really subliminal.  For example, perhaps the seller loves lavender and uses it liberally throughout the house.  Potential Buyer #1 is allergic to it - her eyes start watering and they leave quickly.  Potential Buyer #2 isn't allergic, but finds that something just bothers her about the house - and it turns out that the scent of lavender reminds her of visits to her childhood Great Aunt who she really disliked.  Years ago (at least in my neck of the woods) it was recommended to have a roast cooking in the oven - it would be a "comfort" scent.  That would hardly be the case with vegetarians...

jedikaiti

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #71 on: March 05, 2014, 02:23:32 PM »
I've also heard of baking cookies for that reason.
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

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VorFemme

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #72 on: March 05, 2014, 09:56:37 PM »
I was heavily into counted cross stitch when we were trying to sell a house in 1998.  I set up a chair by a lamp & left my embroidery set up by it...as if I'd left the master bedroom room for just a few minutes between stitches.  The real estate agent LOVED it...and I got some stitching done every night after getting the kids to bed!

As to cooking smells - I was told plain vanilla cookies or bread were more universally appealing scents than other foods or flowers. 
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?

Mopsy428

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #73 on: March 21, 2014, 10:24:11 PM »
If you are not planning on moving, don't put your house on the market...or at least let the buyer's agent know that you are not taking offers.

My fiance and I put an offer on a house on Sunday. It turns out that the man who was selling the house refused to sign the contract because he didn't want to move.  Thank you, sir, for wasting my time, my fiance's time, my agent's time, your agent's time, and your wife's time. It's nice that you are retired, but some of us still work and would rather not spend our weekends looking at and making offers on houses that the owners have no intention of selling.

 >:(

kareng57

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #74 on: March 22, 2014, 01:31:26 AM »
If you are not planning on moving, don't put your house on the market...or at least let the buyer's agent know that you are not taking offers.

My fiance and I put an offer on a house on Sunday. It turns out that the man who was selling the house refused to sign the contract because he didn't want to move.  Thank you, sir, for wasting my time, my fiance's time, my agent's time, your agent's time, and your wife's time. It's nice that you are retired, but some of us still work and would rather not spend our weekends looking at and making offers on houses that the owners have no intention of selling.

 >:(


They might not want to move, but sometimes they have to.  Did the owner realize that he had to move but figured that the offer was not high enough?

The first house that Dh bought (before we were married) had had really weird selling-conditions.  The wife and her husband had separated/divorced years earlier but she was still living in it with three kids - older teens through early 20s.  Apparently the separation agreement stated that she could stay in the house till the youngest kid reached age 19 - that's the age-of-majority here - or, moved out.  Then the house would have to be sold.

What ended up happening was that the youngest kid, at 18, was ready to move out.  Then, the mother was stuck having to move herself and the two older kids out.  To put it mildly, she had absolutely no motivation in encouraging a sale.  The carpets were absolutely filthy, the house had many places where painting had been started and suddenly stopped - etc. - you get the idea.  Never mind the shoddy maintenance and sometimes scary DIY repairs - even I could see the absolutely dangerous electrical "repairs" the previous owner had done.

Not wanting to get into legal issues here, but is it possible that it's an "ordered sale" and the owner just doesn't want to face it?  Or perhaps he's figuring that his home is worth way more $$$  than the evaluated value and is insisting on more?