Author Topic: Instant justice stories  (Read 34697 times)

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TootsNYC

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #210 on: October 21, 2014, 04:43:57 PM »
The guy who was upset about his video game being mislabeled was nasty and upset immediately. Look at the time stamps on his tirade. He took a basic mistake and overreacted, and was nasty about it.
  A mistake so easily fixed, and one that really didn't -hurt- him. It was mislabeled, but it's not like people couldn't have tried to buy it.

He was nasty and unreasonable immediately; if he'd been nice about it, they might have agree to feature his game in some other way. He shot himself in the foot. I'd have been glad about the death threat, because it would mean I could say, "you're unreasonable and nasty, and I don't want to be in a business relationship with you. Go away," and  yet not have quite as much argument about it.

Plus, I'm all for the idea of dropping an immediate boom on people who say stuff like that, even if they don't really mean it.  That level of nastiness needs to go away.

We had a guy who did that--got incredibly nasty about a mistake that had been made in our magazine--a store who sold his product had been ID'd as the designer ("by" instead of "from"). He was nasty to the store lady--who then decided she didn't want to sell his products anymore. He was nasty to the person on my team who was in charge of checking things.

He was nasty to me. I had to call him from vacation to back him down. And I pointed out that we hadn't actually -hurt- him; We didn't take away from him anything that he already had. The most we could possibly have done is  to have neglected to create an extra opportunity for sales that might result from the publicity.
   But we didn't even do that--he did. He doesn't sell his products directly anyway, and anyone who wanted to buy them -could- have purchased them from the person whose contact info was given. We hadn't even lost him that opportunity at a few extra sales--except that since he had been so nasty to the woman whose contact info was linked there, now she wouldn't be selling them. So he'd lost that himself.
    And I pointed out that it surely was in his best interests to be pleasant with us while we figured out how to fix the mistake, because we had no reason now to ever feature his products again.
    And I pointed out that he was nasty immediately--before he had any information, before he even spoke to anyone on the phone, he was nasty. He assumed the worst. And that I wasn't happy that he'd spoken that way to the woman who worked for me, and that I'd taken over the conversation because I wasn't going to have her subjected to that sort of unpleasantness.
   And that no, absolutely not, were we going to give him a free page of advertising in our magazine, worth something like $50,000 just because the -editorial- people had ended up with incomplete information and used the wrong preposition. That I'd been in publishing for years, and not one time ever had an editorial problem ever affected advertising.

Before I called him back, I talked to the advertising person from his sector; he'd purchased some ad at some point, and she said, "He hasn't even paid us for that. So no, I don't care whether he's happy or not. Do what you need to do."
  I thought I'd heard that he went out of business, but some of his products did pop up in a photo a year or so later. But my team also made sure to tell the photo team that we didn't like him and he was hard to deal with.

violinp

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #211 on: October 21, 2014, 09:55:57 PM »
Sir, if you're going to sneak into an auditorium (with booze, no less!), by all means, do so. I'm on my day off and know exactly who to tell to get you escorted off the premises ASAP. It's no big thing, especially since it's still in preshow - all the lights are up, and the trailers haven't even started. You only made yourself look like a world - class idiot.
"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter


Phoebelion

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #212 on: Yesterday at 09:19:17 AM »
We had sued a company that refused to pay their bill and won by default.  We had to send people to confiscate and sell belongings to get the judgment paid.

The owner called and said he was on his way over to kill us all.

I called the police and they went to his house and arrested him.  Something about a FCC rule.

Not the first time he had done this. 

JenJay

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #213 on: Yesterday at 03:02:30 PM »
Sir, if you're going to sneak into an auditorium (with booze, no less!), by all means, do so. I'm on my day off and know exactly who to tell to get you escorted off the premises ASAP. It's no big thing, especially since it's still in preshow - all the lights are up, and the trailers haven't even started. You only made yourself look like a world - class idiot.

That reminds me of the time we went to see Scream. I'm not a fan of horror movies at all because they scare the crap out of me, but I'd heard it was actually a really good movie so I went. And just as an insanely intense part (Drew Barrymore's scene for those who are familiar) was at the climax, an usher squatted down next to me (I was seated on the aisle) and said "Do you have something you need to give me?" I guess he thought I had alcohol. Why he though that I have no clue, but what I gave him was a shrieking scream right in his face. He's lucky I didn't leave him a puddle. That would have been some instant justice. :P

Shalamar

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #214 on: Yesterday at 04:03:00 PM »
Oh dear, JenJay, that made me laugh and laugh.

On a very tenuously related note that has nothing to do with instant justice (sorry), your tale reminds me of when my husband and I were at a wedding "social" (Manitobans will be familiar with this - it's basically a big dance party with cheap alcohol that you pay to attend.  All proceeds go to the bride and groom.)  The DJ was on fire that night, and he played such good music, my then-boyfriend, now-husband and I never left the dance floor.  We danced for hours.  Around midnight, someone came by and asked if we'd like a ride home.   Puzzled, we said "No, thanks."  Someone else came by and asked the same question.  Once again, we said "No, thanks" (wondering "Why on earth is everyone offering to drive us home?").  It finally occurred to us that we were having such a good time, everyone must have thought we were drunk!  (The truth was, we hadn't touched a drop.  Who had the time when there was so much dancing to do?)