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  • July 25, 2016, 08:18:54 PM

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Author Topic: My friend is finally quitting (smoking)  (Read 451 times)

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Venus193

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My friend is finally quitting (smoking)
« on: Today at 07:06:10 AM »
This is not a solicitation for medical advice.

My friend Brunhilde was hospitalized for three days last week being diagnosed with a pulmonary embolism.  This means she will finally have to stop smoking.  She's on the patch now and having to inject herself twice daily with blood thinners to dissolve the clot.

Since it's been so many years since I quit cold turkey I can't think of what I can do to help.  Any ideas?





maksi

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Re: My friend is finally quitting (smoking)
« Reply #1 on: Today at 07:22:53 AM »
I quit cold turkey, too, but reading occasionally Allen Carr's Easyway, which helped a lot to recognize the thought processes I had concerning smoking, why it was so hard to quit, what actually made me want to smoke and so on. Treating the physical addiction is pretty simple, in the end - it's the mental side that's hard, and the book helped with that.

The hardest part was realising I could never ever smoke again, not even a bit, not even once - I'd just slip right back in one tiny bit at a time. Silly, huh, why would I even want to smoke again? It smells and tastes so bad now (although I know of course that it would start to smell and taste good if I went back, but it would take a while). So silly why it feels so difficult, knowing you can never do something again, even when you know it's not good for you at all and isn't actually even that enjoyable. Well, not anymore, haven't smoked for maybe five or six years now? But the first year or two was occasionally pretty hard, the worst part being the first few months.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: My friend is finally quitting (smoking)
« Reply #2 on: Today at 09:01:51 AM »
Go for walks together, if she's able/allowed?  Just do something active with her to help take the edge off and ease the cravings.

Then there is the whole hand to mouth thing so maybe help her prep some healthy snacks for the fridge that she can grab when a craving strikes?  Like carrot sticks, celery, pepper strips.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario

Susiqzer

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Re: My friend is finally quitting (smoking)
« Reply #3 on: Today at 11:36:54 AM »
I quit cold turkey, too, but reading occasionally Allen Carr's Easyway, which helped a lot to recognize the thought processes I had concerning smoking, why it was so hard to quit, what actually made me want to smoke and so on. Treating the physical addiction is pretty simple, in the end - it's the mental side that's hard, and the book helped with that.

The hardest part was realising I could never ever smoke again, not even a bit, not even once - I'd just slip right back in one tiny bit at a time. Silly, huh, why would I even want to smoke again? It smells and tastes so bad now (although I know of course that it would start to smell and taste good if I went back, but it would take a while). So silly why it feels so difficult, knowing you can never do something again, even when you know it's not good for you at all and isn't actually even that enjoyable. Well, not anymore, haven't smoked for maybe five or six years now? But the first year or two was occasionally pretty hard, the worst part being the first few months.

My DH also read that book when he was quitting, and it was the only thing that worked for him. I recommend it to anyone and everyone who mentions trying to quit, as other friends and family members also quit successfully after reading it on his suggestion.

8 years later, he's still smoke-free!


greencat

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Re: My friend is finally quitting (smoking)
« Reply #4 on: Today at 11:42:33 AM »
Can you offer to clean her house for her so it's spic & span - and importantly, not smelling of smoke - before she comes home from the hospital?  Getting her smoking things (lighters, ashtrays, cartons, etc) out of sight may help her, as well as not having that smell around to spark cravings.

Venus193

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Re: My friend is finally quitting (smoking)
« Reply #5 on: Today at 02:18:39 PM »
She's home from the hospital and I think her husband cleaned the place.  But he hasn't been able to quit either.   :-\





flyersandunicorns

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Re: My friend is finally quitting (smoking)
« Reply #6 on: Today at 03:50:13 PM »
My dad had to quit after being hospitalized but he was in there for almost a month, that's a lot more time to shake it off.

Unfortunately, it has to be her decision still. I know many who have not let health issues stop them. I know have people who have been on portable oxygen tanks and they'll take them off long enough to smoke and then go back to their tanks :( :(

Just be encouraging, that's all you can do and be a shoulder to lean on. It's one of those things that we want to try to help others with but honestly there's nothing more than being a friend to do.

Venus193

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Re: My friend is finally quitting (smoking)
« Reply #7 on: Today at 05:25:04 PM »
Quote
Unfortunately, it has to be her decision still. I know many who have not let health issues stop them. I know have people who have been on portable oxygen tanks and they'll take them off long enough to smoke and then go back to their tanks :( :( 

I must have told the story here, but a former CEO of mine had a father who did this.  He had emphysema and would not stop smoking.  His children tried to get him into a permanent care facility but none would accept him because of this.  One night she got The Phone Call.  The oxygen tank had exploded and the entire building burned to the ground.  He died of smoke inhalation while everyone else got out of the building and ended up homeless.





flyersandunicorns

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Re: My friend is finally quitting (smoking)
« Reply #8 on: Today at 05:44:02 PM »
Quote
Unfortunately, it has to be her decision still. I know many who have not let health issues stop them. I know have people who have been on portable oxygen tanks and they'll take them off long enough to smoke and then go back to their tanks :( :( 

I must have told the story here, but a former CEO of mine had a father who did this.  He had emphysema and would not stop smoking.  His children tried to get him into a permanent care facility but none would accept him because of this.  One night she got The Phone Call.  The oxygen tank had exploded and the entire building burned to the ground.  He died of smoke inhalation while everyone else got out of the building and ended up homeless.

How terrifying!! It's miraculous that everyone else got out though.

My great grandparents died in a house fire, so it was always my grandmother's biggest fear. Which thankfully is why when she ended up on oxygen she had a healthy fear to never try a stunt like that.

Luci

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Re: My friend is finally quitting (smoking)
« Reply #9 on: Today at 06:26:07 PM »
I had a small stroke. I only smoked outside anyway. I finished 3 large crewel embroidery projects and sucked on butterscotch candies, meanwhile thinking of what do do with the money we were saving. That was 20 years ago last spring, at age 50.

zyrs

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Re: My friend is finally quitting (smoking)
« Reply #10 on: Today at 07:54:06 PM »
What worked for me was remembering that a cigarette craving usually lasts for 75 seconds and then your body and mind release you until the next craving.  And the cravings come with less and less frequency over time.

So, I got small things to focus on for 75 seconds or so.  Little puzzles, things like that.