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  • March 01, 2015, 10:09:30 AM

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Author Topic: what should a person know before leaving home?  (Read 1873 times)

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Drunken Housewife

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Re: what should a person know before leaving home?
« Reply #60 on: February 26, 2015, 08:46:44 PM »
Oh, I thought of another one today, which I think hasn't been mentioned but is important to me:

learning how to swim.  I made my kids go to swimming lessons over their great vocal dissent.  I don't need them to know the butterfly stroke or how to do a swan dive, but I wanted it so that if they fell into the water, they could swim/tread water/float well. 
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afbluebelle

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Re: what should a person know before leaving home?
« Reply #61 on: February 26, 2015, 08:53:15 PM »
Symptoms to a heart attack and a stroke, and what to do.  I had a friend pass away two days ago from complications from a stroke. None of his family or friends knew what was happening until it was too late to save him.

He would have been the only one who knew what to do (we had a guy have a stroke when we deployed so the symptoms got briefed a lot), but since he was busy, you know, having a stroke.... didn't really help.
My inner (r-word) is having a field day with this one.
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baglady

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Re: what should a person know before leaving home?
« Reply #62 on: February 26, 2015, 09:03:26 PM »
Learn to bargain shop. Learn when it pays to buy cheap and when it pays to invest in something that costs more but will last. Decide what your priorities are, live accordingly (whether it's buying your clothes from Goodwill so you can save for a house, or living in a tiny apartment with 10 roommates so you can afford a cool car), and don't let anyone try to tell you that you're doing it wrong.

Speaking of saving: Put something into savings regularly, even if it's just $10 per paycheck or the change that accumulates in your pocket during the week.

When deciding on a career, do your research. Find out what you can realistically expect to earn, what the demand is, whether a degree is required or optional, and whether the job requires working off-hours and/or being on call, and can you live with that.

I was so naive in this area that it isn't funny. I decided in college to go into broadcasting/journalism based on "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" and the fact that the college radio station didn't require me to get an FCC license to do news. (It did for DJ's.) After college, when I was stuck in a crappy small radio, later newspaper, market, I decided an expensive Ivy League journalism master's would be my ticket into the big time. It wasn't. It was a big wake-up call when an employment agency lady made an offhand remark about "how little reporters make." Until then I had no idea it was a low-paying field -- I thought it had just been my bad luck to be stuck in a low-paying job. But by then I'd already spent big bucks on the master's.



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CakeEater

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Re: what should a person know before leaving home?
« Reply #63 on: February 26, 2015, 10:07:42 PM »
When deciding on a career, do your research. Find out what you can realistically expect to earn, what the demand is, whether a degree is required or optional, and whether the job requires working off-hours and/or being on call, and can you live with that.

That's one that DH and I are in total agreement about. We know so many young adults who have done kind-of wishy-washy degree programs, or degrees that qualify you for jobs that are very difficult to find and are now in admin jobs that don't use them at all.

Benni

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Re: what should a person know before leaving home?
« Reply #64 on: February 26, 2015, 10:11:22 PM »
Start low and work your way up.  You can often get more success starting with the receptionist or assistant than you can the president of the company.

If it is important to you, once you have tried to resolve the situation, go straight to the top.

I realize these seem conflicting, but it depends on the issue.  Need to fix an error with your grades, start with the department admin; need to resolve an issue with a faculty member, go to the department chair.

sammycat

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Re: what should a person know before leaving home?
« Reply #65 on: February 26, 2015, 11:47:52 PM »
The financial information is crucial.  Before I left the parental home for my own place I was taught the envelope system.  I was paid in cash and, every payday, I'd sit down and do the envelopes.   One envelope is for rent, another is for utilities, a third was for food and so on.  It stood me well in the early days of my independence. This was well before the time I had a credit card. 

My mother has always done this and I used to do it too before online banking became the norm. (I can't remember the last time I paid a bill in cash). No matter how much or how little income she'd had, my mum has never been in debt thanks to her envelope system. She's also never had a credit card (I'm not sure she even has an EFTPOS card).

I would love to see budgeting be a compulsory subject in schools. It'd probably save many people a lot of headaches later on.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: what should a person know before leaving home?
« Reply #66 on: February 27, 2015, 08:20:10 AM »
I didn't do the envelope system but I did do a careful budget.  I took my two smallest paychecks of the year and based my budget on those.  Then I'd subtract all my fixed costs - mortgage, insurance, phone, cable, etc. - based on the highest bill I'd paid the previous year.  The money I had left over, I rounded down to the nearest $100.  Then every day, I wrote down what I spent, rounded to the nearest $1.  That coffee I grabbed on the way to work?  I'd get a receipt and write it down.  Whatever it was.  I bought almost everything on my credit card so I'd automatically get the receipt and then paid the card off every month.  Plus, I got rewards points.

The first thing I did was stop buying coffee.  That was $10-15 a week I really didn't need to spend.

Then, the two months of the year where I'd have a third paycheck, that money went into savings or towards the purchase of something big that I needed.  And after about July, the deductions were reduced because I'd maxed out a lot of them.  That extra money went towards Christmas spending and savings.

I did so well with it that I don't even bother to track any more.

My list of things you need to know:
How to drive
How to do basic stuff on your car - check the oil, add windshield washer fluid, change a tire or at least have auto club, know the maintenance schedule for your car to take it in and get it done, know how much oil should be in there, how to check other fluids
How to do laundry properly
How to clean properly
How to budget
How to cook at least basic things
How to do basic household things or at least how to recognize when you need to call someone.
Know how credit works - if I need money that I can't pay back right away, how do I get the lowest interest?  Hint:  It's not payday loans  LOL

I like some of the more esoteric suggestions, like how to fight fair, too, but this is my basic list.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
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Thipu1

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Re: what should a person know before leaving home?
« Reply #67 on: February 27, 2015, 11:30:34 AM »
I find it amazing that students aren't taught the basics of financial literacy on school. It should be easy to introduce concepts such as credit card interest and budgeting into math classes at a fairly young age.

I understand the H&R Block has quite a good, free web site to teach tweens and teens how the real world of money works. 

I think things were easier for children to learn when I was a kid.  We had the Christmas Clubs at the local bank and the savings stamps at the post office.  It felt really grown-up to put part of my allowance money in the Christmas Club each week and it gave me experience of dealing with a bank. If I did that, I knew that I'd have enough to buy gifts for my family.

   


cabbageweevil

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Re: what should a person know before leaving home?
« Reply #68 on: February 27, 2015, 11:48:32 AM »
I've always liked this quote by Robert Heinlein:

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.

Coming on to this thread late: although I'm something of a Heinlein fan -- upon my encountering this dictum of his for the first time (though recognising -- as you, camlan,  do in your post which quotes this Heinlein gem -- that he was engaging in a certain amount of hyperbole): my first thought was, "OK, Robert, class me as an insect, and obliterate me accordingly. There is no possible way that I could satisfy your terrifyingly high standards set out here."

sylviatexas tells of her old boyfriend's mother having taught her children various accomplishments -- including, using chopsticks.  For very sure, if I'd been one of her offspring, she'd have had to give up on me on that one.

And, I've never learned to drive (to my regret -- but something which I see myself as totally unsuited-to, and better for the world at large, if I don't try).  I'm in the UK, where non-driving is less catastrophic than it would seem to be in North America -- where presumably I would have to live in a very large city with good public transport, and mostly stay put there.


Another Sarah

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Re: what should a person know before leaving home?
« Reply #69 on: February 27, 2015, 12:08:05 PM »
for me the biggest thing is this - how to figure stuff out.
My parents were always big on self sufficiency and asking us "What do you think you should do?" rather than giving us all the answers.
Nowadays while I've encountered a lot of stuff I didn't know how to do when I came across it, I've never come across anything that I couldn't cope with. By which I mean putting up shelves, putting together furniture, fixing basic electrical issues but knowing when to call the electrical guy cause it's not safe to attempt to fix it myself. In contrast, a lot of my friends/roommates panicked when confronted with too many remote controls.

On top, I'd suggest these:
Basic food safety (how to tell if something is off, what to freeze, how to store food safely)
How to cook at least three things from scratch
How a washing machine works
Basic electrical safety
Money management