Author Topic: Liz Taylor Wheelchair Etiquette  (Read 6431 times)

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nutraxfornerves

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Re: Liz Taylor Wheelchair Etiquette
« Reply #30 on: April 12, 2010, 11:10:12 AM »
One other thing. I looked up that photo. It was taken at a fashion show in 2008. She is making an entrance on a red carpet. Or, rather AN ENTRANCE!!!

I'll bet the idea is to have Ms. Taylor and her escort be the focus of this photo op, as it would be if she were walking down the carpet. If he were pushing her, he would probably be assumed to be the "paid staff" and ignored  by the photographers.

She and Mr. Winters made a similar entrance in 2007

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evely28

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Re: Liz Taylor Wheelchair Etiquette
« Reply #31 on: April 12, 2010, 11:13:44 AM »
One other thing. I looked up that photo. It was taken at a fashion show in 2008. She is making an entrance on a red carpet. Or, rather AN ENTRANCE!!!

I'll bet the idea is to have Ms. Taylor and her escort be the focus of this photo op, as it would be if she were walking down the carpet. If he were pushing her, he would probably be assumed to be the "paid staff" and ignored  by the photographers.

She and Mr. Winters made a similar entrance in 2007

I love her outfit and the red polish and lipstick.

Rosey

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Re: Liz Taylor Wheelchair Etiquette
« Reply #32 on: April 12, 2010, 02:49:21 PM »
I've spent quite a bit of time in a wheelchair as a result of extensive leg surgery (eight surgeries in ten years). When we are on the right surface, particularly in mall corridors, grocery stores, etc., my DH and I have found a way for him to roll me along with him by holding my hand rather than pushing me. I use one hand to get myself started, and he holds my other hand to keep me up. It doesn't even look like he's pulling me! We love doing this because, honestly, I can't hear anything he says if he's pushing my chair from behind.

With that in mind, there's a good chance Liz Taylor has similar difficulties considering hearing often weakens with age.

Winterlight

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Re: Liz Taylor Wheelchair Etiquette
« Reply #33 on: April 12, 2010, 03:12:10 PM »
My guess is that the person pushing the wheelchair is a paid attendant and pushing the wheelchair is part of his job responsibilities.

Some adults with disabilities prefer that their spouse or SO is not a caregiver, if at all possible. They prefer that the boundaries between spouse and caregiver not get too blurred. Of course, the finances of the average person often require that the SO be a caregiver and they simply have no choice.

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Hushabye

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Re: Liz Taylor Wheelchair Etiquette
« Reply #34 on: April 12, 2010, 08:29:27 PM »
I don't think this is awkward at all. The man pushing the wheelchair is (I assume) her employee.

I would no more expect Liz's fiance to take over her nurse/caregiver's duties than I would expect him to start doing her laundry, scheduling her appointments, cleaning the pool, or performing any other chores for which she has paid staff simply because they are engaged.

I think the reason we so often see spouses or loved ones pushing wheelchairs or performing other caregiving is because private attendants are priced out of reach for most of us. Ms. Taylor is fortunate enough not to have cast her sweetheart in the role of nurse. :)

I couldn't agree with all this more.

I have no real idea what it would be like to be in a wheelchair - but I think that, if I could afford it, as Liz Taylor clearly can, I would very much like to have the aspects of my physical condition that are limiting be handled/enhanced by paid employees, so that I could 'walk' alongside my fiancee as much as I could. I would want to mirror, as closely as physical possible, what it would be like WITHOUT my limiting physical condition.

And I completely agree that most people simply don't have that luxury. Ah, to be a rich as Elizabeth Taylor! ::sighs wistfully::

This completely.  And I also agree with Aeris's later post about respect.  Plus, if they've been making entrances like this for three years now, I highly doubt that she has any problems with the arrangement and might very well have orchestrated them this way for her and his happiness.  It's not our place to judge something like this because we can't know the details of their relationship.

Calypso

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Re: Liz Taylor Wheelchair Etiquette
« Reply #35 on: April 13, 2010, 02:17:10 PM »
It's intriguing, Carnation, that you equate pushing the wheelchair with respect. I'm not saying that's wrong, just that it's interesting.

It would certainly be very disrespectful to let your love one wait for being pushed or left them to depend on the kindness of strangers while you (generic you) sat around or shopped or whatever...but how can it be disrespectful to let a nurse, paid attendant or (as was the case with me in the airport recently) skycap push the chair? I'm happy to do it myself, and I respect my Mom tremendously, but when I was negotiating our suitcases we were both happy to have him do the pushing (he was much faster than me, for one thing).

Acero

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Re: Liz Taylor Wheelchair Etiquette
« Reply #36 on: August 17, 2010, 09:41:16 PM »
I guess it is a paid attendant. Rich people usually do that, they will hire someone who will take care of pushing the wheelchair. Anyway, her date was not invited just to push her around but to be a companion. They will have hard time talking if he would stay at the back.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2010, 03:45:04 AM by Acero »

Winterlight

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Re: Liz Taylor Wheelchair Etiquette
« Reply #37 on: August 18, 2010, 01:09:37 PM »
I don't agree with this manner of her husband. It seems that we are rarely seen a spontaneous person now. Her husband must shows carefulness and loving to her wife.

I'm afraid I don't understand your point. Are you saying that you think he should be pushing the wheelchair, or that he should let the caretaker do it?
If wisdom’s ways you wisely seek,
Five things observe with care,
To whom you speak,
Of whom you speak,
And how, and when, and where.
Caroline Lake Ingalls

MDefarge

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Re: Liz Taylor Wheelchair Etiquette
« Reply #38 on: August 18, 2010, 01:17:36 PM »
Carnation surely you can understand that just because you would feel disrespectful if you weren't pushing your mother's wheelchair that that dynamic does not extend to the rest of the world.  I'm sure that Ms. Taylor is perfectly capable of deciding who she does or does not want pushing her wheelchair - frankly I can't even understand why this is a topic at all.

O'Dell

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Re: Liz Taylor Wheelchair Etiquette
« Reply #39 on: August 18, 2010, 01:37:55 PM »
I think holding her hand at her side is fine.  Did anyone notice that purse?  I love it!  (And I'm rather disturbed by that fact.)

I didn't notice the purse until you pointed out. I was too busy envying Liz's bone structure and feeling sorry for myself! I think she's a class-act...no matter who pushes her wheel chair! :)
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Giggity

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Re: Liz Taylor Wheelchair Etiquette
« Reply #40 on: August 18, 2010, 01:43:46 PM »
Liz Taylor is one of the five most beautiful women of my lifetime. Those eyes, that bone structure, the fashion sense ... THOSE EYES.
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