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Author Topic: Doing No Harm Means Don't Insult The Patient!  (Read 2313 times)

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Onyx_TKD

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Re: Doing No Harm Means Don't Insult The Patient!
« Reply #15 on: February 27, 2018, 02:31:15 PM »
This all sounds difficult and I sympathize.  Just chiming in to say that - as a married woman myself - I took absolutely zero offense to his statement about husbands and wives.  That doesn't mean others can't, though.

My only advice is to separate the two issues from each other both in your mind and in your feedback: one is that he didn't meet your medical expectations, and the other is the comment.

The joke and the poor medical care are pretty inextricably linked in this situation, though. He side-stepped addressing his patient's medical concern about a specific symptom--feeling overheated when her temperature is normal, if I understand correctly--by twisting her words into a pun he could joke about. Regardless whether or not the joke was funny or tasteful or appropriate (IMO, not in this context), its effect was to avoid addressing her medical symptoms, i.e., his job. If he didn't understand what she meant or why she thought it was relevant/concerning, he should have been asking medically relevant questions rather than deflecting with jokes. (He could have addressed the medical concerns seriously before or after making a joke, which might be helpful in certain situations to lighten the mood, but this guy apparently did not--just used it as a way to dismiss his patient's concerns.)

The taste or lack thereof of the joke is indeed a separate manner, although still quite relevant for someone in a position of power and authority dealing with patients who are likely to be physically ill, mentally distraught, feeling vulnerable due to the intimacy of a medical exam, or any combination thereof.

TootsNYC

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Re: Doing No Harm Means Don't Insult The Patient!
« Reply #16 on: February 27, 2018, 04:37:15 PM »
That's a VERY good point, Onyx!

The Lunchlady

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Re: Doing No Harm Means Don't Insult The Patient!
« Reply #17 on: February 27, 2018, 08:45:18 PM »
The taste or lack thereof of the joke is indeed a separate manner, although still quite relevant for someone in a position of power and authority dealing with patients who are likely to be physically ill, mentally distraught, feeling vulnerable due to the intimacy of a medical exam, or any combination thereof.

This. Tasteless joke, and ill, combined with an awareness that I no longer look like myself; my face has been disfigured by an accident, and my eyes have been affected by thyroid disease. Combine it with a DH that isn't emotive. Any jokes about my 'hotness' outside of a therapeutic definition, or not made by me really push my buttons.  ;D
« Last Edit: February 27, 2018, 08:46:55 PM by The Lunchlady »
Bringing civilization to the hungry hordes one lunch period at a time

rashea

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Re: Doing No Harm Means Don't Insult The Patient!
« Reply #18 on: March 01, 2018, 12:37:38 PM »
I'd call the practice and ask about their complaint process. They will have one. I'd also write a letter, because it will likely go in the file. Here's my stab at it from your OP.

Doctor's office (this is why you call, then you can address it),
I recently called for an appointment due to a medical issue. I was unable to see my doctor, and was instead given an appointment with Dr Dodo. I felt he was unprofessional and want to provide feedback. I would also request not seeing that doctor in the future.

I felt he did not listen to my symptoms. He was unwilling to order a basic blood test that I requested due to not being the doctor who would follow up on the results. This makes this visit significantly less helpful, and does not seem to fit in a practiced based system. If he is unwilling to provide any treatment beyond what he himself will follow up upon, perhaps he should not be assigned to see other physician's patients for acute issues between appointments. He also made a tasteless joke about my husband not finding me hot when I attempted to report my temperature symptoms. He offered me medications I have tried unsuccessfully in the past, including one listed on my allergy list. Thankfully I was able to catch this error, but not everyone would have.

I welcome the opportunity to discuss this with you further. I may be contacted at: contact information.




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