Author Topic: Your own personal mysteries.  (Read 302610 times)

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greencat

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2265 on: July 23, 2014, 01:29:40 AM »
You know those four-legged conspirators you were talking about, Greencat? 

Back when we first got our two female cats Mr. Sirius took his wedding ring off and left it on the bedside table.  The next morning we found a kitten playing with it in the hallway.  We're just glad we found it before it disappeared completely.  Now if he takes it off, he puts it into the bedside table's drawer and closes the drawer.  I put mine in my jewelry box, because they haven't figured out how to open that yet.

Some time ago a kitten stole my glasses and hid them under his blanket.  I had to put my contacts in to find them and it took me an hour to think to lift the blanket up. 

Fliss

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2266 on: July 23, 2014, 04:32:04 AM »

Somewhere in our very small house is a screwdriver with a fluro green handle. We have nowhere idea where, but it will turn up eventually. Probably found by the next set of pups in 10 years, since it was the current set that hid it.
Good news! Your insurance company says they'll cover you. Unfortunately, they also say it will be with dirt.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2267 on: July 23, 2014, 08:35:53 AM »
I'm still looking for the chemical ice packs I bought last summer.  And I just thoroughly cleaned the last room I thought they might be in and they aren't in there.  I must have accidentally thrown them out.
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
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guihong

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2268 on: July 26, 2014, 06:42:57 AM »
Yet another genealogical question for which I have clues and theories but nothing definitive.  What was my father doing during WWII?  On December 7, 1941 he was 24 years old with no known physical problems that would 4-F him from service.  My brother was six months old, so maybe he was exempt because of that, but other husbands and fathers went. 

The more intriguing possibility has to do with his profession.  He was an organic chemist who specialized in fuels working on his doctorate at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland.  He always bean-dipped my questions, but my mother recalled that he was suddenly working at another place and could not tell her anything.   Much later, among his old books, I found cryptic papers with what looked like unrelated chemical symbols on them.   He took "business trips" to-somewhere. 

Either his profession alone exempted him due to war needs at home, and/or he became involved, however slightly, with the Manhattan Project.  Case was a major site for this before things moved to New Mexico and Tennessee.   It might explain his reticence all the rest of his life about where he was and what he did.   I'll never know.



Thipu1

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2269 on: July 26, 2014, 10:40:44 AM »
FIL was exempted from the draft in WWII because he was a metallurgist working with some rather exotic products. 

Elfmama

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2270 on: July 26, 2014, 11:46:48 AM »
Yet another genealogical question for which I have clues and theories but nothing definitive.  What was my father doing during WWII?  On December 7, 1941 he was 24 years old with no known physical problems that would 4-F him from service.  My brother was six months old, so maybe he was exempt because of that, but other husbands and fathers went. 

The more intriguing possibility has to do with his profession.  He was an organic chemist who specialized in fuels working on his doctorate at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland.  He always bean-dipped my questions, but my mother recalled that he was suddenly working at another place and could not tell her anything.   Much later, among his old books, I found cryptic papers with what looked like unrelated chemical symbols on them.   He took "business trips" to-somewhere. 

Either his profession alone exempted him due to war needs at home, and/or he became involved, however slightly, with the Manhattan Project.  Case was a major site for this before things moved to New Mexico and Tennessee.   It might explain his reticence all the rest of his life about where he was and what he did.   I'll never know.
It may have been some other classified project.  Manhattan was only one of them.  My bet would be on chemical fueled missiles of some sort. 
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Sirius

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2271 on: July 26, 2014, 02:37:37 PM »
I lost an uncle during WWII, and hardly ever heard him mentioned so I don't know much about him.  My brother, who is also interested in genealogy, visited with an uncle who was the deceased uncle's older brother, and Older Uncle told Bro stories of their teenaged years including Deceased Uncle.  Bro told me the stories, and that about all I know of him. 

The best story was the Halloween when the older uncles got together, climbed a tree in front of their home, and dropped dummies into the open cars of the time.  They did this with my grandmother's blessing, which didn't surprise me as the Grandma I remember was a real card.  Anyway, after the third car ran into the ditch the police came and arrested the older boys.  They were freed quickly since no one was hurt, but were sternly told to stop with the dummy dropping.  Older Uncle was one of those arrested.  This probably happened in the late 1930s, which meant that my mother was a toddler at the time so wouldn't have been involved.  If she'd been a teenager she would have been right up there with her brothers.

greencat

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2272 on: July 26, 2014, 05:24:05 PM »
We're still not sure what my grandfather did in WWII - he either couldn't or wouldn't talk about it, and my mother's records requests after he died have largely met with failure.  Some of the records she was requesting evidently got destroyed by the elements and no longer exist.

guihong

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2273 on: July 27, 2014, 08:25:22 AM »
We're still not sure what my grandfather did in WWII - he either couldn't or wouldn't talk about it, and my mother's records requests after he died have largely met with failure.  Some of the records she was requesting evidently got destroyed by the elements and no longer exist.

Many records were destroyed in a fire in the 1970's, so that may have happened to them also.  Maybe like my dad, you have only indirect evidence, if even that.



guihong

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2274 on: July 27, 2014, 08:29:17 AM »
Yet another genealogical question for which I have clues and theories but nothing definitive.  What was my father doing during WWII?  On December 7, 1941 he was 24 years old with no known physical problems that would 4-F him from service.  My brother was six months old, so maybe he was exempt because of that, but other husbands and fathers went. 

The more intriguing possibility has to do with his profession.  He was an organic chemist who specialized in fuels working on his doctorate at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland.  He always bean-dipped my questions, but my mother recalled that he was suddenly working at another place and could not tell her anything.   Much later, among his old books, I found cryptic papers with what looked like unrelated chemical symbols on them.   He took "business trips" to-somewhere. 

Either his profession alone exempted him due to war needs at home, and/or he became involved, however slightly, with the Manhattan Project.  Case was a major site for this before things moved to New Mexico and Tennessee.   It might explain his reticence all the rest of his life about where he was and what he did.   I'll never know.
It may have been some other classified project.  Manhattan was only one of them. My bet would be on chemical fueled missiles of some sort.
[/b]

That's a good thought.  I was thinking of some kind of rocketry.  The Germans had the best known, but the Allies were working on their own as well. 



iridaceae

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2275 on: July 27, 2014, 08:37:37 AM »
I'd plump for it had to do with his profession as well. If you had a profession deemed important you weren't going to be enlisting. I know I've read that shipbuilders in shipyards were told "we need you more at the shipyeard" for example.

faithlessone

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2276 on: July 27, 2014, 09:38:32 AM »
I'd plump for it had to do with his profession as well. If you had a profession deemed important you weren't going to be enlisting. I know I've read that shipbuilders in shipyards were told "we need you more at the shipyeard" for example.

All 4 of my great-grandfathers got out of WW2 this way. 1 farmer, 1 shipwright and 2 coal miners. There was a list of "reserved occupations" which prevented certain useful members of society from joining up.

Snooks

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2277 on: July 27, 2014, 10:56:37 AM »
I have a Houdini bra wire. Can't work out how it came out of my bra.

Dazi

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2278 on: July 27, 2014, 11:12:48 AM »
I have a Houdini bra wire. Can't work out how it came out of my bra.

Not a mystery at all. I've had it happen dozens of times.  You get a little pinhole at the corner of the seam near your armpit and it just works its way out.   Usually happens when you wash your bras in the washer instead of by hand,  but sometimes it's just because it's a lousy stitched seam.

ETA,  I've also had them work out from the middle.   Super annoying.
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Snooks

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2279 on: July 27, 2014, 11:39:15 AM »
Ah ha, found it. I wouldn't be so annoyed if it wasn't a relatively new bra which, by the time I worked out how comfy it was, has been discontinued.