Author Topic: Your own personal mysteries.  (Read 302508 times)

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AuntieA

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2040 on: December 17, 2013, 06:55:56 PM »
My mother's father's father was one of those German "Russians". According to his family, they were "White Russians". He met my Estonian Great-grandmother at the University in St. Petersburg, where she was studying midwifery and he was studying mathematics.
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Sirius

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2041 on: December 17, 2013, 08:14:56 PM »
I'd like to know who my great-times-5 grandfather's FOO was. Prior to adulthood, there is little information, most of it coming from a court case, and all of it incomplete.

I've got one of those; one of my maternal great-grandfathers seemingly appeared from nowhere.  All I know was that he was born in the 1870s in Indiana.  There's also a question about what the family name actually was, as my mother's oldest brother had a different last name on his birth certificate, but because he resembled his brothers so much it's doubtful that he was adopted. 

guihong

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2042 on: December 17, 2013, 09:51:58 PM »
Who were my 2nd great-grandfather's parents? 

His surname was Frederick, and he was born in 1827 in Hastings County, Ontario.  He died in 1895 in Lambton County, Ontario.  I know all about his wife, his children (my great-grandmother among them), and a good idea of where he lived, via the census.  But he apparently came from Mars, and had no brothers and sisters or even parents.  He should be easy to trace, easier still than any branch of my family in "Bohemia" or my Scottish grandmother's family.

The real problem is that he was born in Moore, Ontario, and there were a tremendous pile of Fredericks in the town ~1820's.  I have no idea how anyone is related, and naturally, no record of Jeremiah prior to his wedding in 1849.  I have many "suspects" for his siblings (including a Frederick wedding he witnessed for the record), but no proof.   Ah, the trials of a genealogist ;).
« Last Edit: December 17, 2013, 09:54:32 PM by guihong »



MommyPenguin

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2043 on: December 18, 2013, 01:06:42 PM »
I wonder what happened to a kid I saw on 20/20 years ago. His name was Timmy and he was on a John Stossel special about kids taken away from the only families they've known. Timmy's mom and boyfriend raised Timmy until he was 11; then the mom died. Timmy's birth father heard about the mom's death + the boyfriend acting as a dad and decided "Ugh, no, you can't raise my kid. Never mind that I didn't want him for 11 years." That part of the segment ended with Timmy kicking up a storm as Birth Dad forced him into a truck, after a judge gave Birth Dad custody. Poor Timmy. :(

Something like this happened where I used to live in Ohio.  A little girl was being raised by her grandparents and mother.  Her mother died, and her birth father showed up with the sheriff and took her away.  I always thought that was a particularly harsh way to do it... show up out of the blue, take the kid away without giving her the chance to say good-bye, pack her special toys, or anything, and then never let her see her grandparents, who she had grown up with, again.  And I considered the sheriff's office complicit in it, as they didn't call ahead to warn the family, tell the father he needed to go through family court, or anything.  They just enforced his right to grab a kid he'd never met because he was the birth father, and let him take her on the spot.

Pen^2

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2044 on: December 18, 2013, 01:21:30 PM »
There are a few television shows I loved as a kid. I've only been able to find out the name of one of them (and of course I then watched all the episodes again on YouTube), but the starring actor, Garth Napier-Jones, seems to have since disappeared completely off the face of the planet. I'll always wonder what became of him. I adored him when I was small.

One of the other shows was about three clowns/mimes, two men and a lady, who would act out a different scenario each episode. Once they were tiny borrower-type people living in an OAP's flat, and they had to alter the springs inside the bathroom scales so the old lady would think her new slippers made her lose weight (it didn't make sense to me at the time, either). Another time, they were sailors shipwrecked on a tiny desert island. Once, they were fairies trying to help the lady fairy recover her wings. I remember so much of this show but can't find anything about this show on the net :( I'd guess that I imagined it except that I've spoken with a few other people who have recalled the same things as I have. None of us can find anything on it. It's like a less-sinister Candle Cove.

pierrotlunaire0

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2045 on: December 18, 2013, 06:08:01 PM »
I always wonder what the final outcome was:  in the late '70s, I was going to school in Buffalo, NY.  The winter of 1978 was brutal, and then came the blizzard at the end of January.  School was shut down for 3 weeks.

In April, I was reading the newspaper, and a story caught my eye.  The first day of the blizzard, a 13 year old boy was off from school.  His parents had somehow made it in to work, so he was alone untuil a friend came over.  They were bored, and started playing around with a gun, playing target practice in the basement.

You guessed it.  The 13 year old accidentally shot and killed his friend.  Panicking, he wrapped the body in a drop cloth, and shoved it into the crawl space.  Later, he lied and told his friend's parents that friend had left hours ago, walking home.  For three months, the friend's parents (assuming he crawled into some shelter on the way home) are searching for their son, while the 13 year old buys Airwick solids and attempts to hide the smells.

In April, the body is found and 13 year old admits all.  I often remember this case because it was such an extreme example of a child making a bad decision/mistake, and then compounding it by making an absolutely horrendous decision.  The article made it clear that everyone believed that the actual death had been a tragic accident, but the horror of trying to cover up a decomposing body had all the involved adults at a loss as to what to do.

I wonder what happened to that 13 year old.
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Dawse

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2046 on: December 20, 2013, 05:35:44 PM »
Along the genealogy theme - where oh where did my 4xgreat-grandparents get the the name Alonso for my 3xgreat-grandfather - in early 19th century Yorkshire?

No, really. My uncle did some family research out of interest, and found as far back as Alonso Burton, my maternal grandmother's great-great-grandfather sometime in the early 1800s (I've forgotten exactly when), and then nothing else furhter back. Burton is a fairly normal name for that area during that time, but Alonso is definitely not. My best guess is a Spanish/Italian mother or grandmother, as my grandma and all her sisters had very thick, dark 'Mediterranean' hair and striking looks. Or, maybe a foreign father who anglicised his surname - but why go to all that trouble and still name your son Alonso, which would definitely have stood out? Maybe Alonso himself was not English, and found his surname caused him trouble in his new homeland - but again, why then stick with Alonso? Why not go the whole way and change to Alan, or Andrew?

I guess we'll never really know for sure, but it's interesting to think about!
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MommyPenguin

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2047 on: December 20, 2013, 10:32:40 PM »
Okay, I have a current mystery that somebody might be able to figure out!

Why does our new microwave turn the surface light on every night?

It doesn't do it during the day.  I keep checking to see if it's on, and it's not.  I notice it at night when I'm finishing up dishes and turn to leave the kitchen.

It doesn't turn it on when I run the microwave.  I've tested it, turning it off, running stuff in the microwave, and then checking.  Still off.

It does it every night, without fail.

The kids are too short to reach it without a stool or chair.  It seems unlikely that one of them would bring a stool over, turn the surface light on, then put the stool back.  That's a lot of work when there are two other lights in the kitchen and the light is mostly directed at the stove, anyway.

I've had no reason to touch any of the buttons in that general area at all lately.  Just basically hitting the number button and that's it.

No other adult has been in the house for the past few days.

Any ideas?

mrs_deb

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2048 on: December 20, 2013, 10:37:07 PM »
Why does our new microwave turn the surface light on every night?

Could it perhaps have an automatic on switch that engages when it gets dark in the room?

MommyPenguin

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2049 on: December 20, 2013, 10:53:10 PM »
You know, you're right, I should look to see if there's some sort of, I don't know, timer or sensor or something.  I can't imagine why one would have such a feature, but it's a new microwave that we've only had for a few days, so maybe there is something I've overlooked like that.

MommyPenguin

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2050 on: December 20, 2013, 10:55:26 PM »
Why does our new microwave turn the surface light on every night?

Could it perhaps have an automatic on switch that engages when it gets dark in the room?

Well, now I feel silly.  I pushed the "options" button and the first button was for "auto night light."  That's fixed.  Mystery solved!  Thanks, Mrs_Deb.  :)

Elfmama

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2051 on: December 20, 2013, 11:17:21 PM »
Along the genealogy theme - where oh where did my 4xgreat-grandparents get the the name Alonso for my 3xgreat-grandfather - in early 19th century Yorkshire?

No, really. My uncle did some family research out of interest, and found as far back as Alonso Burton, my maternal grandmother's great-great-grandfather sometime in the early 1800s (I've forgotten exactly when), and then nothing else furhter back. Burton is a fairly normal name for that area during that time, but Alonso is definitely not. My best guess is a Spanish/Italian mother or grandmother, as my grandma and all her sisters had very thick, dark 'Mediterranean' hair and striking looks. Or, maybe a foreign father who anglicised his surname - but why go to all that trouble and still name your son Alonso, which would definitely have stood out? Maybe Alonso himself was not English, and found his surname caused him trouble in his new homeland - but again, why then stick with Alonso? Why not go the whole way and change to Alan, or Andrew?

I guess we'll never really know for sure, but it's interesting to think about!
Perhaps there was a popular novel of the time that had a hero named Alonso? 

The mystery name in my genealogy is "Waitstill."  Female name, I think 18th C, but the info is on DH's computer and he's gone to bed.
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GreenEyedHawk

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2052 on: December 21, 2013, 12:30:22 AM »
My paternal grandfather's father is a mystery as well.  He was the proverbial man who went out for a carton of milk and never came back.  No one knows if he went missing, or abandoned his wife and kids or what.  My own father doesn't know the man's name and I don't really want to ask my grandfather...it feels invasive.  And it doesn't help that my grandfather's name is as common as it gets (his name is Tom Wilson).
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mrs_deb

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2053 on: December 21, 2013, 09:59:17 AM »
Well, now I feel silly.  I pushed the "options" button and the first button was for "auto night light."  That's fixed.  Mystery solved!  Thanks, Mrs_Deb.  :)

It was either that or a poltergeist, but I guess this is better :-).

raininshadows

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Re: Your own personal mysteries.
« Reply #2054 on: December 21, 2013, 02:21:20 PM »
What happened with my cell phone? As I was leaving for a trip (class trip for an online class, we were flying in alone and meeting the teacher there), I ran a standard system update on my phone. When it attempted to restart, it crashed unrecoverably. Dad had to run home and get me a spare we had lying around. I put the broken phone in the zipped compartment of my messenger bag, and promptly lost it and next found it several months later trying to retrieve a library card I'd dropped in the same place. It functioned perfectly and I believe it's still in use. Why didn't I find the phone when I checked that compartment in the intervening time? Why did the system update break my phone, and so far as we know only my phone? Finally, why was it okay after months in my bag?