Author Topic: Local slang  (Read 1766 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Mergatroyd

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 598
Re: Local slang
« Reply #30 on: September 14, 2014, 10:27:48 PM »
It makes sense at -50 with the wind howling outside, I'm sure. Also, there are a lot more rabbits in Saskatchewan than Kangaroos.

Little Jo

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 443
Re: Local slang
« Reply #31 on: September 15, 2014, 07:25:49 PM »
sucking diesel- [everything is] going exceptionally well "now we are sucking diesel"
I'll clean your clock - I am very annoyed with you
Perished - to be very cold
eejit/amadán - idiot  usually ya right eejit -you are a very foolish
howyehun - how are you
and not a babby in the house washed-  Be the Lord Harry it's that time and not a babby in the house washed. Oh goodness look at the time and I have not done any thing that is on my list for today
 Hun....affectionate term to say hello to people who's names you do not know. can be used for both males and females "ye all right there hun?" Do you require any assistance
I'd eat the back door buttered - I am very hungry





Mergatroyd

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 598
Re: Local slang
« Reply #32 on: September 15, 2014, 10:30:59 PM »
sucking diesel- [everything is] going exceptionally well "now we are sucking diesel"
I'll clean your clock - I am very annoyed with you
Perished - to be very cold
eejit/amadán - idiot  usually ya right eejit -you are a very foolish
howyehun - how are you
and not a babby in the house washed-  Be the Lord Harry it's that time and not a babby in the house washed. Oh goodness look at the time and I have not done any thing that is on my list for today
 Hun....affectionate term to say hello to people who's names you do not know. can be used for both males and females "ye all right there hun?" Do you require any assistance
I'd eat the back door buttered - I am very hungry

Please, please, tell us where you are from!

katiescarlett

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1090
Re: Local slang
« Reply #33 on: September 16, 2014, 12:31:07 AM »
Native Okie here.  All soda is pop or coke.  As in:  "Do you want a coke?"  "Sure, I'll take a Dr. Pepper."

Fixin' to- I am about to do something.  I'm fixin' to go to the store.

Turn signal is blinker.

Refrigerator is fridge or ice box (sometimes)

My grandma liked to say "yesterday of an evenin'"  She also added an s to Walmart.  "Yesterday of an evenin' I went to Walmarts and bought groceries."  This means "last night."  I tend to say it's hotter than blue blazes in here, though in my accent it comes out "hotter'n blue blazes."

Never put g on the end of words.  You are readin', writin,' studyin', goin', shoppin', workin', etc.  Days of the week rhyme with the word me:  pronounced Sundee, Mondee, Tuesdee, Wednesdee, Thursdee, Fridee, Saturdee.  I don't do this as much as my grandpa and dad.  Also, I don't do this as much, but a lot of my family are bad about saying warsh instead of wash.

mime

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 721
Re: Local slang
« Reply #34 on: September 16, 2014, 04:34:34 PM »
Crella, my husband gave me a whole lesson on proper pronunciation when I moved to New England with him. Barn-stable is not correct, Foul-mouth is not correct.....;)


That would be Baaahn-stible and Fahl-muth, I believe  ;D :D

I'm often surprised when I hear city names pronounced by the people who live there, rather than those of us who just read the name and try to figure out how to pronounce it, probably with our own accent thrown in for good measure.  Like a couple from Pierre, SD called it "peer" when I thought it was "pe-AIR".  :P  And heaven help me: I have no idea where to stuff all the syllables that I think I need in "Worchestershire".

As for regional sayings, I'm in Minnesota. Stuff I tend to hear almost entirely from people born and raised here:
"uff-da" = "wow, that was challenging!"
"sure" (pronounced "shuuuur") = verbal validation that I understand what you're saying
"that's where I'll hang my hat" = "that's my story, and I'm stickin' to it"
"hot dish" = casserole
"fine" can mean anything from "ok" to "very nice!", depening on the tone. I guess with the right tone it can also mean "it's not fine, but I don't want to listen to you talk about it anymore", but that may be less regional.  ;)

ITSJUSTME

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 409
Re: Local slang
« Reply #35 on: September 16, 2014, 05:22:44 PM »
In Chicago we might say

Down d'alley (down the alley)
Fronchroom (front room or living room or "parlor")
Djeetyet (did ya eat yet?)
Da Jewels (the Jewel, local grocery store)
and my all time favorite
Over down dere (over down there - or wherever it is you're mentioning)

And Katiescarlet, I am used to saying/hearing "gonna" meaning I'm going to.  I heard more and more "finna" and finally asked the woman (a Southerner) what it meant.  She explained that I might say gonna.  When she said Finna it meant "fixing to".  It floored me.

Whimsyone

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 51
Re: Local slang
« Reply #36 on: September 16, 2014, 05:31:32 PM »
Mime, it's very simple. Woo-sta! :)
"Half of being smart is knowing what you're stupid at." Anon.

Little Jo

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 443
Re: Local slang
« Reply #37 on: September 16, 2014, 05:45:58 PM »
sucking diesel- [everything is] going exceptionally well "now we are sucking diesel"
I'll clean your clock - I am very annoyed with you
Perished - to be very cold
eejit/amadán - idiot  usually ya right eejit -you are a very foolish
howyehun - how are you
and not a babby in the house washed-  Be the Lord Harry it's that time and not a babby in the house washed. Oh goodness look at the time and I have not done any thing that is on my list for today
 Hun....affectionate term to say hello to people who's names you do not know. can be used for both males and females "ye all right there hun?" Do you require any assistance
I'd eat the back door buttered - I am very hungry

Please, please, tell us where you are from!
You couldn't guess? I am Irish and from Wexford in Ireland

readingchick

  • Trivia Buff
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2648
Re: Local slang
« Reply #38 on: September 16, 2014, 07:57:09 PM »
I'd love to be able to add something to this thread but I really can't think of much, it must all be normal to me!

I googled it, and I am surprised. Apparently these are not common in the rest of the world? (I'm Canadian)


ABM, bank machine: where the money comes from.

bachelor: bachelor apartment,

Chinook: a warm, dry wind

deke: A word derived from decoy and used to decribe a fake or feint, or trick.

eaves troughs : grooves or channels that attach to the underside of the roof of a house to collect rainwater.

garburator: a garbage disposal unit located beneath the drain of a kitchen sink.

hydro: a synonym for electrical service

rad: Short for radiator in a car or home heating, but pronounced like the first sylable of 'radical'.

Making puppies: (more commonly called F$&@@$ the dog) doing nothing, slacking off, especially at work.

Ginch: underwear

Half-sack : six pack of beer


mickey: a small (13 oz.) bottle of liquor, shaped to fit in a pocket, much like a hip flask. Also fits conveniently alongside the calf of a cowboy boot or rubber boot.

Skid: a reference to people who appear down and out with raggedy clothing, sometimes homeless, or drug users.

twenty-sixer or two-six: a 26 oz bottle of alcohol like vodka etc.

Two-four: pack of beer.


Now I'm really curious.

You missed bunnyhug.  :)
A hooded jacket with kangaroo style front pockets.

Okay, I'm curious.....why do people from Saskatchewan refer to hoodies as bunnyhugs? I've been racking my brain trying to figure out what the connection is and can't find it.....  :-[

Don't feel bad. The rest of the country can't figure it out either. :D

whew, that's a relief! I'm glad I'm not the only one who couldn't figure it out :)

Julia Mercer

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 958
    • Country Gals Fan Page
Re: Local slang
« Reply #39 on: September 17, 2014, 08:02:23 PM »
The hubby is a Newfie, so this website would tell it best

http://www.joebattsarm.ca/phrases.htm

oz diva

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1139
  • The Classics are SO last Century
Re: Local slang
« Reply #40 on: September 17, 2014, 10:48:26 PM »

Stubby - small bottle of beer
Stubby holder - something to hold your stubby with, to prevent your hands from getting chilled
CBD - central business district (akin to downtown)
Whipper snipper - a motorized tool used to cut down weeds

Victoria

Thipu1

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6763
Re: Local slang
« Reply #41 on: September 18, 2014, 10:30:39 AM »
Some nicknames for NYC neighborhoods drive visitors nuts.

Soho-- South of Houston Street.  Here, 'Houston' is pronounced 'HOUSE-t'n.

Noho-- See above.

TriBeCa -- Triangle Below Canal Street.

The real head-scratched is Dumbo.  This means 'Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass'.

Mergatroyd

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 598
Re: Local slang
« Reply #42 on: September 18, 2014, 11:18:55 AM »
The hubby is a Newfie, so this website would tell it best

http://www.joebattsarm.ca/phrases.htm

Well, taps are what are in my kitchen over here on the west coast, but the rest of that just reminds me of my highschool Social Studies teacher. (Loved her!)

crella

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1013
Re: Local slang
« Reply #43 on: Yesterday at 02:06:53 AM »
Some nicknames for NYC neighborhoods drive visitors nuts.

Soho-- South of Houston Street.  Here, 'Houston' is pronounced 'HOUSE-t'n.

Noho-- See above.

TriBeCa -- Triangle Below Canal Street.

The real head-scratched is Dumbo.  This means 'Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass'.

I always wondered what those meant! Thank you!