Author Topic: Celebrities upstaging others' social events?  (Read 12777 times)

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hyzenthlay

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Re: Celebrities upstaging others' social events?
« Reply #75 on: July 06, 2010, 02:23:03 PM »
A strobe light doesn't have to make noise to be distracting.  Her attire has the same impact as a strobe light.

Not if you are not looking at it.

Once the ceremony is on and everyone is seated her outfit would not have stood out in the crowd, unless the crowd made a point of staring. If they choose to do so that doesn't make her rude for wearing an outfit that is typical for her, anymore then it would make someone rude for wearing a Sari, a kilt, a kimono, etc.

Bob Ducca

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Re: Celebrities upstaging others' social events?
« Reply #76 on: July 07, 2010, 08:51:23 PM »
A strobe light doesn't have to make noise to be distracting.  Her attire has the same impact as a strobe light.

Not if you are not looking at it.

Once the ceremony is on and everyone is seated her outfit would not have stood out in the crowd, unless the crowd made a point of staring. If they choose to do so that doesn't make her rude for wearing an outfit that is typical for her, anymore then it would make someone rude for wearing a Sari, a kilt, a kimono, etc.

Speaking only from my own experience: I see people wearing various forms of cultural dress all the time.  I live in a suburb in Texas, not New York City, so I would assume that, in a city so much more diverse than my own, students would be far more accustomed to various styles of cultural garb than I.  I don't think equating a cultural form of dress with a deliberately outlandish and attention-grabbing fashion choice is a fair comparison.

hyzenthlay

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Re: Celebrities upstaging others' social events?
« Reply #77 on: July 07, 2010, 11:09:19 PM »
I don't think equating a cultural form of dress with a deliberately outlandish and attention-grabbing fashion choice is a fair comparison.

Cultural garb that comes out once or twice a year is as attention getting as wearing a ball gown or a beekeepers hat. Just because it is traditional does not make it less noticable, or in my opinion more acceptable. But that's because I don't have a problem with what Gaga wore provided she sat down and quietly watched the ceremony.

If everyone is quietly seated, clothing is a minimal distraction.

rose red

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Re: Celebrities upstaging others' social events?
« Reply #78 on: July 08, 2010, 12:30:27 PM »
If everyone is quietly seated, clothing is a minimal distraction.

So if I sit quietly, it's OK for me to wear old sweatpants and oversized t-shirt (my norm) to one of my best friend's upcoming huge formal wedding?  Yay!

TheBardess

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Re: Celebrities upstaging others' social events?
« Reply #79 on: July 08, 2010, 12:44:44 PM »
A strobe light doesn't have to make noise to be distracting.  Her attire has the same impact as a strobe light.

Not if you are not looking at it.

Once the ceremony is on and everyone is seated her outfit would not have stood out in the crowd, unless the crowd made a point of staring. If they choose to do so that doesn't make her rude for wearing an outfit that is typical for her, anymore then it would make someone rude for wearing a Sari, a kilt, a kimono, etc.

I think the difference is this:

Scenario 1: Person in a sari

Graduation Attendee (glancing idly around the audience): *thinks to self* Oh, wow, what a beautiful sari! (admires for a few more minutes, moves on, focuses attention back on ceremony. Perhaps points out sari to friend, but it is a minimum distraction to both of them)

Scenario 2: Lady Gaga in outrageous getup

Graduation Attendee (glancing idly around the audience): *thinks to self* Geez, what is that woman wear...holy cow, is that Lady Gaga???? *elbows friend and whispers* Hey, look, I think that's Lady Gaga!!!
Friend: Oh my gosh, you're right! *elbows other friend and points* Look, it's Lady Gaga!
3rd Friend: CRUD MONKEYS!! GAGA!!! *elbows OTHER friend* Did you know Gaga is here???
etc., etc. until pretty soon most of the audience is focused on trying to spot Gaga, rather than on the graduates.

So I think there is a real difference between someone wearing garb indicative of their culture, and a celebrity (who is likely already going to attract some notice) dressing in a manner that is likely to attract EVEN MORE notice at an event that is intended to honor other people.
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hyzenthlay

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Re: Celebrities upstaging others' social events?
« Reply #80 on: July 08, 2010, 01:09:30 PM »
So if I sit quietly, it's OK for me to wear old sweatpants and oversized t-shirt (my norm) to one of my best friend's upcoming huge formal wedding?  Yay!

The main concern was that she was taking attention from the grads. My point it that is if she seated herself quietly, it's the audience that would have done that. The same would apply if you choose to wear a sweat suit to a wedding.

We had a couple of old friends of my FIL and DH rather plainly dressed at our wedding. No one cared. Nor do I think a Lady Gaga at my graduation would have been more then pre-ceremony entertainment for the crowd.

Scuba_Dog

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Re: Celebrities upstaging others' social events?
« Reply #81 on: July 08, 2010, 01:15:56 PM »
A strobe light doesn't have to make noise to be distracting.  Her attire has the same impact as a strobe light.

Not if you are not looking at it.

Once the ceremony is on and everyone is seated her outfit would not have stood out in the crowd, unless the crowd made a point of staring. If they choose to do so that doesn't make her rude for wearing an outfit that is typical for her, anymore then it would make someone rude for wearing a Sari, a kilt, a kimono, etc.

I think the difference is this:

Scenario 1: Person in a sari

Graduation Attendee (glancing idly around the audience): *thinks to self* Oh, wow, what a beautiful sari! (admires for a few more minutes, moves on, focuses attention back on ceremony. Perhaps points out sari to friend, but it is a minimum distraction to both of them)

Scenario 2: Lady Gaga in outrageous getup

Graduation Attendee (glancing idly around the audience): *thinks to self* Geez, what is that woman wear...holy cow, is that Lady Gaga???? *elbows friend and whispers* Hey, look, I think that's Lady Gaga!!!
Friend: Oh my gosh, you're right! *elbows other friend and points* Look, it's Lady Gaga!
3rd Friend: CRUD MONKEYS!! GAGA!!! *elbows OTHER friend* Did you know Gaga is here???
etc., etc. until pretty soon most of the audience is focused on trying to spot Gaga, rather than on the graduates.

So I think there is a real difference between someone wearing garb indicative of their culture, and a celebrity (who is likely already going to attract some notice) dressing in a manner that is likely to attract EVEN MORE notice at an event that is intended to honor other people.

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hyzenthlay

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Re: Celebrities upstaging others' social events?
« Reply #82 on: July 08, 2010, 01:36:19 PM »
Graduation Attendee (glancing idly around the audience): *thinks to self* Geez, what is that woman wear...holy cow, is that Lady Gaga???? *elbows friend and whispers* Hey, look, I think that's Lady Gaga!!!
Friend: Oh my gosh, you're right! *elbows other friend and points* Look, it's Lady Gaga!
3rd Friend: CRUD MONKEYS!! GAGA!!! *elbows OTHER friend* Did you know Gaga is here???
etc., etc. until pretty soon most of the audience is focused on trying to spot Gaga, rather than on the graduates.

Is there any evidence that this happened? Because I think that would be more likely to happen if she was dressed 'normally.'

By dressing in the fashion she did, she's easy to spot, the heads turn early, spot her even before she's seated, and move on. They don't have to keep scanning the audience looking for her, or distract themselves from dull speeches by seeing if they can guess where she is sitting.

If she is to attend at all, I think she is allowed to dress in her customary manner. I don't like requiring her to 'tone it down for the norms.' If you're going to do that, you might as well ban celebs from attending any public functions.

Sharnita

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Re: Celebrities upstaging others' social events?
« Reply #83 on: July 08, 2010, 03:14:12 PM »
Graduation Attendee (glancing idly around the audience): *thinks to self* Geez, what is that woman wear...holy cow, is that Lady Gaga???? *elbows friend and whispers* Hey, look, I think that's Lady Gaga!!!
Friend: Oh my gosh, you're right! *elbows other friend and points* Look, it's Lady Gaga!
3rd Friend: CRUD MONKEYS!! GAGA!!! *elbows OTHER friend* Did you know Gaga is here???
etc., etc. until pretty soon most of the audience is focused on trying to spot Gaga, rather than on the graduates.

Is there any evidence that this happened? Because I think that would be more likely to happen if she was dressed 'normally.'

By dressing in the fashion she did, she's easy to spot, the heads turn early, spot her even before she's seated, and move on. They don't have to keep scanning the audience looking for her, or distract themselves from dull speeches by seeing if they can guess where she is sitting.

If she is to attend at all, I think she is allowed to dress in her customary manner. I don't like requiring her to 'tone it down for the norms.' If you're going to do that, you might as well ban celebs from attending any public functions.

Honestly I don't know that she is important enough for them to do that.

Bob Ducca

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Re: Celebrities upstaging others' social events?
« Reply #84 on: July 08, 2010, 03:25:30 PM »
I don't think equating a cultural form of dress with a deliberately outlandish and attention-grabbing fashion choice is a fair comparison.

Cultural garb that comes out once or twice a year is as attention getting as wearing a ball gown or a beekeepers hat. Just because it is traditional does not make it less noticable, or in my opinion more acceptable. But that's because I don't have a problem with what Gaga wore provided she sat down and quietly watched the ceremony.

If everyone is quietly seated, clothing is a minimal distraction.

If someone only wears cultural clothing once or twice a year, and does it to deliberately attract attention to themselves, then I think you are making a fair comparison.  Most of the people with whom I am acquainted wear their cultural garb normally, all the time, and not to garner attention to themselves.

Lady Gaga dresses to attract attention to herself.  It's why she does it.  Someone wearing "plain" clothing at a wedding is in no way comparable.  Dressing appropriately is given a very wide interpretation on this board, but something I think is almost universally agreed on as rude is dressing in a way calculated to draw attention to one's self and away from the honoree/focus of the event.

If a guest attends a wedding in a big white wedding dress, that is rude, no matter how quietly he or she sits during the ceremony.  To say that dress is never an issue as long as the person in question is quiet simply isn't true.

Lady Gaga had two choices if she wanted to attend her sister's graduation: dress like a "normal" person, which, although she would have gotten attention, would have made it at least appear as though she was only there to support her sister, or dress to distract, which made it appear as though she was there to get attention for herself.  I am not saying that her dressing differently would have made people not notice her.  I'm saying if she had worn a simple, normal outfit, it would have appeared as though she was at least making an effort not to attract attention away from her sister and the other graduates, and she chose not to do that.

Hushabye

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Re: Celebrities upstaging others' social events?
« Reply #85 on: July 08, 2010, 03:55:07 PM »
There is also Lady Gaga and there is Stephani, the woman who wears the persona of Lady Gaga.  She could have come as herself, but she chose to come as Lady Gaga.  I'm with whoever wondered earlier if she's really able to separate the two right now.

Aeris

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Re: Celebrities upstaging others' social events?
« Reply #86 on: July 08, 2010, 04:03:56 PM »
Graduation Attendee (glancing idly around the audience): *thinks to self* Geez, what is that woman wear...holy cow, is that Lady Gaga???? *elbows friend and whispers* Hey, look, I think that's Lady Gaga!!!
Friend: Oh my gosh, you're right! *elbows other friend and points* Look, it's Lady Gaga!
3rd Friend: CRUD MONKEYS!! GAGA!!! *elbows OTHER friend* Did you know Gaga is here???
etc., etc. until pretty soon most of the audience is focused on trying to spot Gaga, rather than on the graduates.

Is there any evidence that this happened? Because I think that would be more likely to happen if she was dressed 'normally.'

By dressing in the fashion she did, she's easy to spot, the heads turn early, spot her even before she's seated, and move on. They don't have to keep scanning the audience looking for her, or distract themselves from dull speeches by seeing if they can guess where she is sitting.

If she is to attend at all, I think she is allowed to dress in her customary manner. I don't like requiring her to 'tone it down for the norms.' If you're going to do that, you might as well ban celebs from attending any public functions.

Honestly I don't know that she is important enough for them to do that.

I'm making no judgments right now about whether her outfit was appropriate, and also haven't decided whether her dressing normally or normal-for-Lady-Gaga would have attracted *more* attention, but I really think you're massively underestimating the importance of Lady Gaga to this age range/group/etc.

She's going to be a big deal, regardless of what she wears. And in all likelihood, the rumor mill at this school had long before the ceremony gone wild on the possibility of her attending the graduation - it's not like it was a secret that her sister went there, or that she was graduating. I'm going to bet money that a whole bunch of the graduates were *already* primed and scanning for Lady Gaga before she ever showed up.

TheBardess

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Re: Celebrities upstaging others' social events?
« Reply #87 on: July 08, 2010, 04:11:53 PM »
Graduation Attendee (glancing idly around the audience): *thinks to self* Geez, what is that woman wear...holy cow, is that Lady Gaga???? *elbows friend and whispers* Hey, look, I think that's Lady Gaga!!!
Friend: Oh my gosh, you're right! *elbows other friend and points* Look, it's Lady Gaga!
3rd Friend: CRUD MONKEYS!! GAGA!!! *elbows OTHER friend* Did you know Gaga is here???
etc., etc. until pretty soon most of the audience is focused on trying to spot Gaga, rather than on the graduates.

Is there any evidence that this happened? Because I think that would be more likely to happen if she was dressed 'normally.'

By dressing in the fashion she did, she's easy to spot, the heads turn early, spot her even before she's seated, and move on. They don't have to keep scanning the audience looking for her, or distract themselves from dull speeches by seeing if they can guess where she is sitting.

If she is to attend at all, I think she is allowed to dress in her customary manner. I don't like requiring her to 'tone it down for the norms.' If you're going to do that, you might as well ban celebs from attending any public functions.

Honestly I don't know that she is important enough for them to do that.

Although apparently she's important enough for us all to spend several days and six pages picking apart her outfit and her motivation for wearing it...  ;)

I think we're getting to the point here where there isn't much new to say, the points have been made, and we're all just going to have to agree to disagree.
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hyzenthlay

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Re: Celebrities upstaging others' social events?
« Reply #88 on: July 08, 2010, 04:16:56 PM »
Cultural garb that comes out once or twice a year is as attention getting as wearing a ball gown or a beekeepers hat. Just because it is traditional does not make it less noticable, or in my opinion more acceptable. But that's because I don't have a problem with what Gaga wore provided she sat down and quietly watched the ceremony.

I know many Native Americans that are never seen in cultural clothing, but do pull it out for ceremonies, in the same way other people pull out the suits and dresses. I just don't think the dress I wear twice a year ought to be any more acceptable for being rather dull.  

Noting that my opinion is based on the set up of a graduation, the formality of which encourages people to focus on the stage. If everyone is quietly seated, even a bee keepers hat and funky shoes don't really stand out.

A different public function might get a different answer from me.

jimithing

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Re: Celebrities upstaging others' social events?
« Reply #89 on: July 08, 2010, 04:57:48 PM »
Cultural garb that comes out once or twice a year is as attention getting as wearing a ball gown or a beekeepers hat. Just because it is traditional does not make it less noticable, or in my opinion more acceptable. But that's because I don't have a problem with what Gaga wore provided she sat down and quietly watched the ceremony.

Noting that my opinion is based on the set up of a graduation, the formality of which encourages people to focus on the stage. If everyone is quietly seated, even a bee keepers hat and funky shoes don't really stand out.


Really? Because I would immediately focus on the person wearing a giant bee keeper's hat, that is huge and bulky. Shoes are one thing, but a bee keepers hat? If someone showed up wearing an astronaut helmet, I'm pretty sure that would stand out as well.