Author Topic: The Etiquette of giving real wool  (Read 4802 times)

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One Goat to Rule Them All

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Re: The Etiquette of giving real wool
« Reply #15 on: July 30, 2010, 08:53:34 PM »
thanks everyone! I'm starting to feel better about the hand-washing thing, as you say winter hats don't get washed so often anyway. I know my family is ok with wool, so the allergies won't be an issue either.

kudeebee

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Re: The Etiquette of giving real wool
« Reply #16 on: July 31, 2010, 11:59:41 PM »
I am allergic to wool, so a wool hat wouldn't work for me.  I agree that this is a know your audience type of gift.  You know the people that you will give the gifts to: if they can wear wool, if they would appreciate your effort, and if they would want to take the time to handwash the hat.  I like hats that can go into the washer and then air dry myself.  So, if I were given the hat you make, I would thank you very nicely and then probably regift/donate it.

Nurvingiel

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Re: The Etiquette of giving real wool
« Reply #17 on: August 01, 2010, 12:15:50 AM »

I'm in the allergic to wool crowd, too, sadly. If i weren't i would love a wool hat. Like PP's have said, hats don't really need washing all that often - i am sure the pleasure would be more than the "burden" of having to clean it.
This, but I do wear wool socks (over thin cotton ones). Waaaaaarm.

However I would totally hand wash stuff. I wouldn't worry about that.
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high dudgeon

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Re: The Etiquette of giving real wool
« Reply #18 on: August 02, 2010, 10:52:31 AM »
I find that interesting, because I always wash winter hats after a week or two of wear. I might not feel compelled to wash a wool sweater that often, since I would be wearing a turtleneck or other shirt under it and it wouldn't be touching my skin directly. But a hat that will be right against my skin and hair, and be soaking up sweat, skin oils, hair spray and maybe some makeup, I wouldn't want to keep wearing over and over without washing it. It might be another case of knowing your audience and finding out if the intended recipient goes all winter wearing the same hat without washing it, or if they prefer to wash them more often.

whoknows

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Re: The Etiquette of giving real wool
« Reply #19 on: August 03, 2010, 11:19:29 AM »
Either that or just include a slip of paper in the box saying "Made for you by XX.  100 percent wool ~ hand wash only"  

This is what i do with all knitted items, even the acrylic baby items.

It seems to work so far.

- i'm now off to find some sew in labels, i may be some time  ;D -

VorFemme

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Re: The Etiquette of giving real wool
« Reply #20 on: August 05, 2010, 09:49:36 AM »
Order them online...........eBay, Nancy's Notions, and Clotilde.com all have them.............where do you think that I got mine?
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DangerMouth

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Re: The Etiquette of giving real wool
« Reply #21 on: August 05, 2010, 10:39:20 AM »
I wouldn't at all mind the care real wool needs, but I can't wear it next to my skin. So a cardigan is fine, but I wouldn't wear an unlined hat. In general, I think hand crafted gifts are awesome. My skills only go to scarves, but I've given plenty of those.

I'm dying to try a pair of those socks with the self-striping cotton yarn.

TootsNYC

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Re: The Etiquette of giving real wool
« Reply #22 on: August 08, 2010, 05:05:27 PM »
I don't handwash anything.

I stick it in a net bag to cut down on agitation, and throw it in the washer on cold. Then, the net bag is the cue that it doesn't go in the dryer, so it hangs to dry.

I've never had anything ruined that way.

The thing that shrinks wool is heat and agitation.

I wouldn't worry about it. Put the "100% wool; hand wash in cold" label on it, and leave it alone.

kschmid5

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Re: The Etiquette of giving real wool
« Reply #23 on: August 08, 2010, 06:11:27 PM »
As a fellow knitter, I suggest going with the superwash wool.  If you need additional color choices, go online for lots of yarn options.

The truth is that even someone who is willing to handwash might make a mistake anyway, and the items will probably go in the washing machine at least once.

However, it's probably ok if you make hats out of wool.  Those seem to get washed very rarely, unlike socks or other items.

hellgirl

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Re: The Etiquette of giving real wool
« Reply #24 on: August 08, 2010, 06:54:08 PM »
I wouldn't mind being given woolens. And I try and be careful about how they're washed, and don't mind handwashing. However I refuse to feel too badly about shrinking/slightly felting a woolen jumper my mum gave my little'un. It still fits (will get short before it gets narrow now). She wasn't impressed, but who gives a new first time mum a handwash only jumper and thinks that's going to end well!  :P

sbtier

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Re: The Etiquette of giving real wool
« Reply #25 on: August 10, 2010, 12:26:12 PM »
I don't handwash either, I bring wool sweaters to the dry cleaner.  I'd check though to make sure nobody has an allergy or sensitivity to wool. 

Jocelyn

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Re: The Etiquette of giving real wool
« Reply #26 on: August 11, 2010, 05:17:46 PM »
I knit too. I was buying yarn for a gift sweater earlier this week. Found exactly what I wanted in wool...then thought about the recipient. I don't believe she's allergic to wool, but she's just moved into an assisted care center. She would have trouble washing out a big fluffy wool sweater by hand, and the odds of it getting dumped into the laundry by mistake are just too much. So I kicked back to acrylics.

As for dry-cleaning wool- I took a class with a fiber artist who said 'Never use anything to wash wool that you wouldn't use to wash your own hair.' Adding a little conditioner to the rinse water, then rinsing with clear water will cut down on wool itchies. Sometimes the chemicals used in processing wool are what's scratchy, not the wool itself. But products that make human hair sleek and smooth will have the same effect on wool. And dry cleaners don't use fresh dry-cleaning fluid for each garment... which sort of hits my EWW factor. Unless the garment is tailored, so that you're trying to preserve the interfacings and structural seams, consider whether hand washing might be better and cheaper.

BioformCassie

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Re: The Etiquette of giving real wool
« Reply #27 on: August 15, 2010, 08:38:04 AM »
I really like these labels http://www.artfire.com/modules.php?name=Shop&op=listing&product_id=1083472 I want some for my handknits that I sell but can't justify the expense until I have a real job to help pay for it. I've heard really awesome reviews about them. (She also has an etsy store) Maybe you could include these on your items. You can include washing instructions that are attached and are so less likely to get lost than a piece of paper.

Hanna

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Re: The Etiquette of giving real wool
« Reply #28 on: August 15, 2010, 09:03:36 AM »
I'd love it!

DavidH

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Re: The Etiquette of giving real wool
« Reply #29 on: August 16, 2010, 01:18:49 PM »
The labels are the greatest idea ever since someone clueless like me would be certain to put it in the washing machine otherwise.