Author Topic: When A Common Phrase Isn't....  (Read 4889 times)

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Linley

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Re: When A Common Phrase Isn't....
« Reply #15 on: August 07, 2010, 06:03:33 PM »
In the sam spirit as Nutrax's, someone I am working with, who is not a native English speaker, told us all the other day that he would be out of pocket on certain days when he meant out of town or out of contact.


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Hillia

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Re: When A Common Phrase Isn't....
« Reply #16 on: August 07, 2010, 06:57:16 PM »
In the sam spirit as Nutrax's, someone I am working with, who is not a native English speaker, told us all the other day that he would be out of pocket on certain days when he meant out of town or out of contact.

I've used out of pocket many times...not only am I not at work, I won't be reachable; for example, if I'm going camping and won't have cell service. 

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Brentwood

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Re: When A Common Phrase Isn't....
« Reply #17 on: August 07, 2010, 06:59:15 PM »
In the sam spirit as Nutrax's, someone I am working with, who is not a native English speaker, told us all the other day that he would be out of pocket on certain days when he meant out of town or out of contact.

"Out of pocket" does mean out of contact (in addition to meaning expenses paid for out of one's own resources).

Kaora

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Re: When A Common Phrase Isn't....
« Reply #18 on: August 07, 2010, 08:57:39 PM »
A single word here, cattacorner.  Not sure the origins of that one, it means diagnol, and is common here.  However, bf, a Floridian, gave me the weirdest look saying it.

DangerMouth

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Re: When A Common Phrase Isn't....
« Reply #19 on: August 07, 2010, 09:05:56 PM »
A single word here, cattacorner.  Not sure the origins of that one, it means diagnol, and is common here.  However, bf, a Floridian, gave me the weirdest look saying it.

We say 'kittycorner' up north.

KenveeB

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Re: When A Common Phrase Isn't....
« Reply #20 on: August 07, 2010, 09:10:27 PM »
A single word here, cattacorner.  Not sure the origins of that one, it means diagnol, and is common here.  However, bf, a Floridian, gave me the weirdest look saying it.

We say 'kittycorner' up north.

I say "cattycorner". :)

Kaymyth

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Re: When A Common Phrase Isn't....
« Reply #21 on: August 07, 2010, 11:37:59 PM »
A single word here, cattacorner.  Not sure the origins of that one, it means diagnol, and is common here.  However, bf, a Floridian, gave me the weirdest look saying it.

We say 'kittycorner' up north.

I say "cattycorner". :)

As do I, though my brain has always wanted to spell it "cat-e-corner".  Really does make you wonder about the etymology of that one.



katycoo

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Re: When A Common Phrase Isn't....
« Reply #22 on: August 08, 2010, 02:21:49 AM »
A favorite of mine: when you're overwhelmed and confused, you don't know if you're afoot or on horseback.

For me, this one is not knowing whether you're Arthur or Martha.

squeakers

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Re: When A Common Phrase Isn't....
« Reply #23 on: August 08, 2010, 05:17:57 AM »
A single word here, cattacorner.  Not sure the origins of that one, it means diagnol, and is common here.  However, bf, a Floridian, gave me the weirdest look saying it.

We say 'kittycorner' up north.

I say "cattycorner". :)

As do I, though my brain has always wanted to spell it "cat-e-corner".  Really does make you wonder about the etymology of that one.

M-W.com says: kitty-corner alteration of cater-corner, from obsolete "cater"= four  + corner
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Kaora

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Re: When A Common Phrase Isn't....
« Reply #24 on: August 08, 2010, 05:18:17 AM »
A single word here, cattacorner.  Not sure the origins of that one, it means diagnol, and is common here.  However, bf, a Floridian, gave me the weirdest look saying it.

We say 'kittycorner' up north.

I say "cattycorner". :)

As do I, though my brain has always wanted to spell it "cat-e-corner".  Really does make you wonder about the etymology of that one.

Maybe fuzzballs who lived diagonally to each other?  ;D

DangerMouth

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Re: When A Common Phrase Isn't....
« Reply #25 on: August 08, 2010, 09:46:21 AM »
A single word here, cattacorner.  Not sure the origins of that one, it means diagnol, and is common here.  However, bf, a Floridian, gave me the weirdest look saying it.

We say 'kittycorner' up north.

I say "cattycorner". :)

As do I, though my brain has always wanted to spell it "cat-e-corner".  Really does make you wonder about the etymology of that one.

M-W.com says: kitty-corner alteration of cater-corner, from obsolete "cater"= four  + corner

Thank you!

As to being confused, one of my favorite sayings (tho obviously I don't get to use it much is "he didn't know whether it was Donkey's Patoot or breakfast time" It's just so.. random.

jaxsue

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Re: When A Common Phrase Isn't....
« Reply #26 on: August 08, 2010, 10:10:00 AM »
I was describing Douglas MacArthur to my freshmen students and mentioned that he had a huge ego.  From the reaction I got from the students they didn't know what "ego" meant but were erroneously speculating and were shocked that I'd disclose that to them.

Was english their first language? Ego is such a basic word.  ???

jaxsue

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Re: When A Common Phrase Isn't....
« Reply #27 on: August 08, 2010, 10:15:13 AM »
My boss is Israeli and 99% of my coworkers are from Central/South America. My boss speaks Hebrew and Russian fluently, but struggles with English.

I have to be careful how I use idioms, because they will usually stare blankly at me or take what I say literally. It is sometimes pretty funny.  :)

Meanwhile, all 2 of us who are born in the US and speak English fluently can speak entirely in idioms and no one has any idea what we're talking about. (FTR, this is rare and we're not doing it to exclude anyone; it is quite accidental)

Giggity

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Re: When A Common Phrase Isn't....
« Reply #28 on: August 08, 2010, 10:16:35 AM »
When I was little and my mom would give me a bath she'd always say "Skin a rabbit!" when I'd take a bath.  Everyone in my family does it. The first time my husband ever heard me tell our daughter to "skin her rabbit" he about flipped out and told me to stop saying it.

In my family, "skin the cat" is how we tell the little ones to strip down for bath time. Or if we're helping them, usually we say it while we pull the shirt off over their head.
Words mean things.

Sharnita

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Re: When A Common Phrase Isn't....
« Reply #29 on: August 08, 2010, 01:01:33 PM »
I was describing Douglas MacArthur to my freshmen students and mentioned that he had a huge ego.  From the reaction I got from the students they didn't know what "ego" meant but were erroneously speculating and were shocked that I'd disclose that to them.

Was english their first language? Ego is such a basic word.  ???

ENglish is their lahgugae but urban dialect, if you will.  There is a lot of vocabulary that seems basic until you notice the balnk expression - kids don't always ask.  It is actually one ot the frustrations of standardized testing.  The test question is phrased in a way that is unfamiliar to the kisd and if it were phrased differently they would know the answer.