Author Topic: Glad he didn't say that to her face!!  (Read 7322 times)

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ChristiKayAnn

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Re: Glad he didn't say that to her face!!
« Reply #45 on: August 03, 2010, 04:43:10 PM »
LOL

along with 'really you were alive before the internet?'

I recently told my 8 year old son that I remember when my mum and dad had a telephone installed in the house (we got one fairly late really) and he looked at me like I had two heads. He will refer to any time period before he was born as 'back in the olden days'. I'm trying to train him out of that...

Not long ago I was overhearing a few co-workers assembling a list of household phrases that would have sounded completely off-the-wall a generation or two ago.  One of them was "where's the phone?!"  Uh - in the kitchen (or hallway) where it's been for the last 20 years?

This is a list of things that was read at the senior camp I led last week (think scout camp for senior citizens but with nice cabins not tents) it sounds a lot like what we are talking about.

The 60's vs Now 

Then: Long hair.
  Now: Longing for hair.

  Then: The perfect high.
  Now: The perfect high-yield mutual fund.

  Then: Keg.
  Now: EKG.

  Then: Acid Rock.
  Now: Acid reflux.

  Then: Moving to California because it's cool.
  Now: Moving to California because it's warm.

  Then: Growing pot.
  Now: Growing pot belly.

  Then: Watching John Glenn's historic flight with your parents.
  Now: Watching John Glenn's historic flight with your children.

  Then: Trying to look like Marlon Brando or Elizabeth Taylor.
  Now: Trying not to look like Marlon Brando or ElizabethTaylor.

  Then: Seeds and stems.
  Now: Roughage.

  Then: Popping pills, smoking joints.
  Now: Popping joints.

  Then: The president's struggle with Fidel.
  Now: The president's struggle with fidelity.

  Then: Killer weed.
  Now: Weed killer.

  Then: Hoping for a BMW.
  Now: Hoping for a BM.

  Then: The Grateful Dead.
  Now: Dr. Kevorkian.

  Then: Getting out to a new, hip joint.
  Now: Getting a new hip joint.

  Then: Rolling Stones.
  Now: Kidney stones.

  Then: Being called into the principal's office.
  Now: Calling the principal's office.

  Then: Screw the system!
  Now: Upgrade the system.

  Then: Peace sign.
  Now: Mercedes logo.

  Then: Parents begging you to get your hair cut.
  Now: Children begging you to get their heads shaved.

  Then: Take acid.
  Now: Take antacid.

  Then: Passing the driver's test.
  Now: Passing the vision test.

  Then: "Whatever"
  Now: "Depends"

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Glad he didn't say that to her face!!
« Reply #46 on: August 03, 2010, 07:25:44 PM »
LMAO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  HEEHEEHEEHEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!

That's a great list!!   

I love "Growing Pot" "Growing Pot Belly"
Popping pills, smoking joints
Popping joints.  Heeheehee!
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

LadyJaneinMD

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Re: Glad he didn't say that to her face!!
« Reply #47 on: August 12, 2010, 12:35:37 PM »
Once again, speaking of phones, I STILL HAVE my old dial phone.  I bought it back when the phone company just started making you buy your phones, and I bought the cool kitchen phone that had the chalkboard/corkboard on it, and you could put your phonebooks inside.  I don't even know if it still works, but it did 10 years ago.
Of course, it's impossible to 'press 1 for English' on it.

My father used to go to a  2-room school.


baglady

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Re: Glad he didn't say that to her face!!
« Reply #48 on: August 12, 2010, 08:14:16 PM »
When I was teaching, a student asked me if I'd been a hippie in the '60s. I told her, "I was born in 1958. Do the math." To this day I wish I'd been born early enough to have been a hippie! These days I hang out with people who were born in the '40s and *were* hippies ... or at least hippie sympathizers.

Had the following conversation with a co-worker named Linda, about 10 years ago when she was in her late 20s and I was in my early 40s:

Linda: "I'm tired of telling people my name and hearing, 'Oh, that's my mom's name!' I wish I didn't have such an old-lady name!"
Me: "Linda isn't an old lady name. It's my sister's name!"
L: "How old is your sister?"
Me: "Fifty-three."
L: "That's old!"

I remember ... the plain black rotary phones that belonged to The Phone Company. They were just starting to offer Princess and Trimline phones, but they still belonged to The Phone Company, and you had to pay a premium for them. Touch-Tone was just coming out when I was a teenager, but again, it was something you paid extra to The Phone Company for. On a lark, around 1979, I went to the AT&T store and bought one of those pedestal phones (like the one Andy Griffith used to use -- "Hello, Sarah? Get me Floyd!" -- but it was still rotary dial. A roommate used to call it the "Capone Phone.")

I worked one of those switchboards like the one Lily Tomlin used on "Laugh-In," with the bank of holes you plugged big wires into.

Cable TV in its infancy ... when you lived out of close range of television stations and needed cable to get reliable reception. But there was no HBO, no Showtime, no TNT or CNN. What you got for cable was decent reception of broadcast channels you might not get otherwise.

My dad had an 8-track, and one Father's Day I bought him the 8-track tape of Elvis' "Aloha From Hawaii" concert.

My first tape recorder (9th birthday present) was a reel-to-reel. About three years later, I got a cassette recorder/player. Bought a Bobby Sherman tape, and the vocals were almost inaudible. I'm guessing this was because my machine was mono, and the tape was stereo.

In short, I have lots of ammo to one-up you young folks, but since I hang out with people older than me (Bagman is 10 years older, best friend is almost 20 years older), I'm usually the one who gets one-upped. "You remember 5-cent stamps? I remember 3-cent stamps!" -- that sort of thing.
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saddened

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Re: Glad he didn't say that to her face!!
« Reply #49 on: August 13, 2010, 07:50:25 AM »

In short, I have lots of ammo to one-up you young folks, but since I hang out with people older than me (Bagman is 10 years older, best friend is almost 20 years older), I'm usually the one who gets one-upped. "You remember 5-cent stamps? I remember 3-cent stamps!" -- that sort of thing.


I'm like that with the guys in my team at work. Most are younger than me, but there's a couple around my age. Had to laugh a few weeks ago as we were discussing the cheapest price of paddle pops here in Australia (I remember when they were 8 cents!)

Oh and I have very fond memories of my first cassette player. It was a birthday present and I also received a Bay City Rollers cassette - I wore that thing out!

Ereine

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Re: Glad he didn't say that to her face!!
« Reply #50 on: August 13, 2010, 09:06:47 AM »
Last week I met some random little boy who presumably lives around here and got into a conversation with him. I can't remember all the things he said, they were rather funny but among other things he asked me if I was going to be dead when he was grown up. I said that I hoped not :) (I was maybe 25 years older than him and I really hope to be alive in about 15 years)

Perfect Circle

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Re: Glad he didn't say that to her face!!
« Reply #51 on: August 13, 2010, 01:26:59 PM »
My DH is quite a bit older than I am and he keeps joking that the whole world was black and white until the early 70s... I wouldn't know ;)...

I used to think my grandma was really old when she turned 50... I had a girl in my class whose dad was older than my grandmother which was really weird. And that girl didn't consider 50 old at all.

Now DD is going to be in a similar situation. Someone called DH her grandad during the week when they were at the playground. I think that made him feel really old.

But I think it'll be really cool for her too. Her daddy was a punkrocker, played in a punk band and saw a lot of now quite legendary acts live in London in the olden days.

And me, well, I was a proper grunge girl  8)
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Piratelvr1121

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Re: Glad he didn't say that to her face!!
« Reply #52 on: August 13, 2010, 04:06:16 PM »
I was reminded of the Titanic comment last week when my friend and I went to the Titanic exhibit at the local Discovery Center and got to chatting with the gentleman who built the 1/13th scale model of the ship.   I mentioned that my granddaddy was born the year it was built and she smiled and said "Well I'm a lot older than this one.*pointing to me*  My granddad graduated high school 4 years prior and my grandma graduated 2 years before, so I heard plenty about it from them."

When we had our run in with the rude employee at Home Depot, later in the car my friend huffed about the woman giving me a sticker and said "She probably thinks I'm the mother of the 3 of you, like I must have had you, then those two later."
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

baglady

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Re: Glad he didn't say that to her face!!
« Reply #53 on: August 13, 2010, 06:58:25 PM »
I was reminded of the Titanic comment last week when my friend and I went to the Titanic exhibit at the local Discovery Center and got to chatting with the gentleman who built the 1/13th scale model of the ship.   I mentioned that my granddaddy was born the year it was built and she smiled and said "Well I'm a lot older than this one.*pointing to me*  My granddad graduated high school 4 years prior and my grandma graduated 2 years before, so I heard plenty about it from them."

When we had our run in with the rude employee at Home Depot, later in the car my friend huffed about the woman giving me a sticker and said "She probably thinks I'm the mother of the 3 of you, like I must have had you, then those two later."

I saw those pictures of you and your friend on the other thread, and there's *no way* she looks old enough to be your mom! I can see where you might get mistaken for sisters, though.

My dad got mistaken for my grandparent quite a bit -- my mom, not so much; my dad aged harder. But they were 37 and 38 when I was born (in 1958), and my siblings were 11, 14 and almost 18. That sort of gap was odd back then, but today, with blended families more common, it's not all that unusual to have siblings with big age gaps. (Forty years ago, second marriages tended to happen later in life and were not likely to produce more children. "The Brady Bunch" was the rule; "Yours, Mine & Ours" was the exception.)

We've had threads here about girls and young-looking women getting the stink-eye when they're out and about with children -- even if they're the child's step- or half-sibling, aunt, cousin, babysitter, or simply a very young-looking mom. I'm sure Bagman's older daughter, who became a mom in April, will be on the receiving end of this; she's 28 but looks about 15.
« Last Edit: August 13, 2010, 07:18:12 PM by baglady »
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kherbert05

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Re: Glad he didn't say that to her face!!
« Reply #54 on: August 13, 2010, 08:14:10 PM »

I saw those pictures of you and your friend on the other thread, and there's *no way* she looks old enough to be your mom! I can see where you might get mistaken for sisters, though.

My dad got mistaken for my grandparent quite a bit -- my mom, not so much; my dad aged harder. But they were 37 and 38 when I was born (in 1958), and my siblings were 11, 14 and almost 18. That sort of gap was odd back then, but today, with blended families more common, it's not all that unusual to have siblings with big age gaps. (Forty years ago, second marriages tended to happen later in life and were not likely to produce more children. "The Brady Bunch" was the rule; "Yours, Mine & Ours" was the exception.)

We've had threads here about girls and young-looking women getting the stink-eye when they're out and about with children -- even if they're the child's step- or half-sibling, aunt, cousin, babysitter, or simply a very young-looking mom. I'm sure Bagman's older daughter, who became a mom in April, will be on the receiving end of this; she's 28 but looks about 15.

Funny how your own history can affect your perceptions. I would have thought that it was much more common for a parent (especially the mom) to die. There be a remarriage with much younger kids.

My great-great grandmother passed away. Great- great-grandfather remarried had several more kids with my Great-Grandfather's step mom Uncle Press being one but closer in age to my Nanna than my great-grandfather.

My great-grandmother passed away. Great-grandfather remarried resulting in 1 daughter Estelle a high school aged girl, when mom was in elementary school

Uncle Press (My great-great grandfather's brother) was born early 1900's was a doctor. Did surgery on people's kitchen tables because there was no hospital or they would bleed out before the horse and wagon could get them there. He delivered my mom and her 9 siblings. Saved Mom's life when common wisdom was you don't survive pneumonia the 3rd time much less the 5th or 6th. And sometime around 1972 saved me when my cousin and I gave each other bites of our ice cream/or traded them. (Her ice cream had peanuts).
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baglady

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Re: Glad he didn't say that to her face!!
« Reply #55 on: August 13, 2010, 08:42:51 PM »
I was thinking more in terms of 1960s/1970s blended families, in which divorce, not death, was more likely to be the reason parents were rendered single. In the late 19th/early 20th centuries, it was more common for young mothers to die (often in childbirth) and for the still-young husband to take another, young wife and have children with her.

The second marriages I've witnessed since 1970 or so have involved couples 40 and up, and they did not have children together. There's one couple I know (now 60-ish) -- she was a widow with kids, he was divorced with kids. They made the conscious decision *not* to have children together, even though they were young enough, because they didn't want the older kids they brought to the family to ever feel "less-than" because they weren't biologically both of theirs. This is not a slam on any single parent who *did* marry and have children with a new spouse; it was simply their choice, and it worked for them.
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kareng57

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Re: Glad he didn't say that to her face!!
« Reply #56 on: August 13, 2010, 08:50:59 PM »

I saw those pictures of you and your friend on the other thread, and there's *no way* she looks old enough to be your mom! I can see where you might get mistaken for sisters, though.

My dad got mistaken for my grandparent quite a bit -- my mom, not so much; my dad aged harder. But they were 37 and 38 when I was born (in 1958), and my siblings were 11, 14 and almost 18. That sort of gap was odd back then, but today, with blended families more common, it's not all that unusual to have siblings with big age gaps. (Forty years ago, second marriages tended to happen later in life and were not likely to produce more children. "The Brady Bunch" was the rule; "Yours, Mine & Ours" was the exception.)

We've had threads here about girls and young-looking women getting the stink-eye when they're out and about with children -- even if they're the child's step- or half-sibling, aunt, cousin, babysitter, or simply a very young-looking mom. I'm sure Bagman's older daughter, who became a mom in April, will be on the receiving end of this; she's 28 but looks about 15.

Funny how your own history can affect your perceptions. I would have thought that it was much more common for a parent (especially the mom) to die. There be a remarriage with much younger kids.

My great-great grandmother passed away. Great- great-grandfather remarried had several more kids with my Great-Grandfather's step mom Uncle Press being one but closer in age to my Nanna than my great-grandfather.

My great-grandmother passed away. Great-grandfather remarried resulting in 1 daughter Estelle a high school aged girl, when mom was in elementary school

Uncle Press (My great-great grandfather's brother) was born early 1900's was a doctor. Did surgery on people's kitchen tables because there was no hospital or they would bleed out before the horse and wagon could get them there. He delivered my mom and her 9 siblings. Saved Mom's life when common wisdom was you don't survive pneumonia the 3rd time much less the 5th or 6th. And sometime around 1972 saved me when my cousin and I gave each other bites of our ice cream/or traded them. (Her ice cream had peanuts).

Well, generations ago, remarried people didn't have a whole lot of choice as to whether to become parents again.  Contraception options were minimal.  It's also true that often remarriages occurred fairly quickly.  They were far more likely to be due to widowhood rather than divorce.  While they might have been love matches - eventually, anyway - there was more of an element of necessity.  A man needed a woman to raise his children, and a woman needed the financial support.

From the mid 1960s or so onward, it was different.  A blended family with parents in their mid to late 30s might simply have no interest in adding babies to their brood of adolescents.  Regarding Yours, Mine & Ours - I believe that both parents were Catholic anyway (I read the book a long time ago).

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Glad he didn't say that to her face!!
« Reply #57 on: August 13, 2010, 09:03:30 PM »
I was reminded of the Titanic comment last week when my friend and I went to the Titanic exhibit at the local Discovery Center and got to chatting with the gentleman who built the 1/13th scale model of the ship.   I mentioned that my granddaddy was born the year it was built and she smiled and said "Well I'm a lot older than this one.*pointing to me*  My granddad graduated high school 4 years prior and my grandma graduated 2 years before, so I heard plenty about it from them."

When we had our run in with the rude employee at Home Depot, later in the car my friend huffed about the woman giving me a sticker and said "She probably thinks I'm the mother of the 3 of you, like I must have had you, then those two later."

I saw those pictures of you and your friend on the other thread, and there's *no way* she looks old enough to be your mom! I can see where you might get mistaken for sisters though.
Well most people we encounter when together ask if we're related and DH did say that we do interact in a way that would suggest either mother and daughter or sisters, depending on the subject and tone we use while speaking to each other, and the fact that we even sound alike when we talk.   On Tuesday, neither of us wore makeup and that was the day that the photographer at the old time photo shop and DH's coworkers guessed that she's my mother.    I ought to remind her that it doesn't mean she looks her age, since I'm often mistaken for being younger than my age.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata