Author Topic: Fundraising Etiquette  (Read 4940 times)

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Sharnita

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Re: Fundraising Etiquette
« Reply #30 on: August 11, 2010, 12:28:52 PM »
What do people think about this idea?  On personal fundraisers, rather than announcing a total, announce that 'We raised enough money for Joe to get a wheelchair with the XYZ features he needs, to make needed modifications to his home for wheelchair accessibilty and to pay off X% of his outstanding medical bills.  Thanks, everyone!'

I'd be happy with something like that.  Then the public doesn't know the exact figure and the people who donated know what their money is doing for Joe.

I don't like it.  The reality might be more like "He can now catherter himself for the next month".  I don't nee to audit his/her medical care.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Fundraising Etiquette
« Reply #31 on: August 11, 2010, 12:31:50 PM »
I agree that we don't need to have that kind of detail!  More like, 'Joe's medical expenses are covered for the next 3 months'.  I don't need to know that those medical expenses cover catheters and colostomy bags!
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Ontario

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Re: Fundraising Etiquette
« Reply #32 on: August 11, 2010, 12:38:56 PM »
I agree with the others that I think the difference is that it's for a private family instead of an organization.  There are privacy issues with a family, and they aren't set up like a nonprofit is.  With a nonprofit, I think it's appropriate for them to show how much total was raised.

Also, I'd worry a bit about the family becoming a target, not just of speculation but also of fraud or theft, if the amount were known.  Unethical people might not really think about it when it was just a general fundraiser, etc., but if all of a sudden they heard "$20,000 was raised," they might think, "Hmm, this family will be receiving a check for $20,000, how can I get at that?" or something.  Hearing the number would make it more "real" to people and might let thieves know that it's significant enough to make the attempt worth it (finding out how the money will be received, watching the mail for a letter from the organization, etc.).

I was thinking the same thing.  I'd hate for some shady character to know that family was recently given a check for $XXXXXX.XX and it's sitting in the bank right now ripe for the picking.  And I shudder to think if that shady character knew the name and address of the family.

Surianne

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Re: Fundraising Etiquette
« Reply #33 on: August 11, 2010, 12:41:32 PM »
What do people think about this idea?  On personal fundraisers, rather than announcing a total, announce that 'We raised enough money for Joe to get a wheelchair with the XYZ features he needs, to make needed modifications to his home for wheelchair accessibilty and to pay off X% of his outstanding medical bills.  Thanks, everyone!'

I'd be happy with something like that.  Then the public doesn't know the exact figure and the people who donated know what their money is doing for Joe.

I think that if it's something easily quantifiable and announceable like the wheelchair, and the person involved is cool with sharing that info, it's a good idea.  It would depend on the situation

kingsrings

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Re: Fundraising Etiquette
« Reply #34 on: August 11, 2010, 12:47:02 PM »
I agree that we don't need to have that kind of detail!  More like, 'Joe's medical expenses are covered for the next 3 months'.  I don't need to know that those medical expenses cover catheters and colostomy bags!

LOL. "The funds have covered: 5 catherers, 10 colostomy bags....".

jimithing

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Re: Fundraising Etiquette
« Reply #35 on: August 11, 2010, 01:20:33 PM »
I like the idea of even sharing *how* it helped them and their family. I guess when I donate, I want to be able to see how my efforts help in some way, you know?

I did a fundraiser a while ago. I don't want to give a lot of details, but lets say it was raising blankets for local homeless shelters. I had a counter on my blog for a while, and then I did a report back how the deliveries went. In fact, I just received a TY card from one of the places, and I posted that on my Facebook page. I think people like to see the results of their donations.