Author Topic: How to best set up a second meeting  (Read 1107 times)

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AmberVolakis

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How to best set up a second meeting
« on: August 09, 2010, 09:08:08 PM »
I need some advice on how my SO can best approach this job situation.

BG: late last year, when we moved to our new city, my Significant Other responded to an ad for a part-time, entry level job at a certain company. SO had just started her master's degree, and had her subject of study and her expected graduation date on her resume. She was called in for an interview with the director of the company (it's a small, local place). At the interview, the director looked again at my SO's resume and realized that she had misread it and my SO didn't have her degree yet (the director was receovering from the flu and noted that she shouldn't have gone through the resumes while on medication!).

The director was very apologetic, and despite the mixup my SO and the director had a very nice conversation. The director was very enthusiastic about the field my SO was going into and offered her some good advice. It gave my SO a great boost and validation that she was going into the right field since here a potential employer was being so enthusiastic. At the end of the interview, the director told my SO that, on the basis of the degree she thought SO had, the director had called her for an interview intending to offer her something more permanent and more lucrative than the PT job advertised. The director again emphasized how she had been looking for someone in SO's field for a long time, it was rare to find (SO is in the only graduate program in our state which offers it) and hoped SO would keep the company in mind when she did graduate. The director encouraged my SO to contact her again once SO was closing to finishing her degree.

Well, fast forward to now, and SO noticed that this same company just put an ad out for a PT receptionist. She wondered about applying, as the hours would work for her, but decided that it might be awkward considering that she actually still wants to contact the director about that other, more lucrative job down the line. However, the receptionist job would get her foot in the door, so to speak.

So basically we want everyone's thoughts on how to approach this situation. The advice I gave my SO was to send the director an Email setting up another meeting, perhaps informal, and for SO to tell the director how much their initial meeting meant to her and how she has now progressed in her degree (she enjoys the program and has a 4.0 GPA so far). I don't think SO should necessarily go for the receptionist job, but rather talk to the director about her practicum. See, my SO's degree requires some hours in hands-on implementation of the techniques in her field, and she basically has to find some place to do that. I thought that - since the director was already so enthusiastic and receptive - SO should talk to the director about some arrangement where my SO can do some unpaid work there for a semester in exchange for her required academic credits. My reasoning is that if the director was so excited about hiring someone to do the work, then she might be even more enthusiastic about getting a graduate student to do some of the same work for free. Then hopefully, once the semester ends and my SO has her degree, the director might be impressed and more likely to offer my SO the same job they originally talked about. (A similiar thing happened when I got my master's - I did an unpaid internship as part of my thesis and did a good enough job that the director of the place offered me an actual, permanent job after I graduated.)

The SO agrees with me but is wondering whether to possibly mention the receptionist position, like by saying something in the meeting like, "I noticed you posted an ad for a PT receptionist. Is there something like that I could do for you?" The SO said that based on the director's personality and their previous interaction, she feels that the director would appreciate it if SO honestly said something like, "Can you tell me the best way to get my foot in the door here? What are you looking for in the prospective employees?" (They had a good rapport and the director is apparently a straight shooter type, they spoke candidly to each other.) I think that's good and the latter would be the best way to approach it. Anyone agree/disagree? Also, does anyone have any tips for how to best write a note to the director asking for a meeting like that?

(Note: while we're not certain that the director didn't hire anyone else in the SO's field, we're pretty sure she hasn't because we've kept an eye on the company's website, where all the employees/their specialties are listed, and as yet no one is listed with SO's specialty.)

sbtier

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Re: How to best set up a second meeting
« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2010, 09:46:26 AM »
I'm confused.  It's mentioned in the beginning that the director was having trouble finding someone in the field because it's rare.  But now SO wants to get the foot in the door to the point where they want to be a receptionist? 

I would just contact them about the lucrative position. 

ShadesOfGrey

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Re: How to best set up a second meeting
« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2010, 09:52:35 AM »
Keep the receptionist position and the internship position separate things completely.  Essentially, your SO wants them to create a position for her, and so she has to write an enticing cover letter, advertising her strengths and the benefit to the company for hiring her. 

Mentioning the receptionist position makes her look like she's looking for a "job" rather than "I want to work for your wonderful company and can bring so much value to you!"  kwim?

Good luck!
Words mean more than what is set down on paper. It takes the human voice to infuse them with shades of deeper meaning. - Maya Angelou

I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel. - Maya Angelou

AmberVolakis

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Re: How to best set up a second meeting
« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2010, 08:52:02 PM »
Good point, Pumpkin! Thanks.

LEMon

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Re: How to best set up a second meeting
« Reply #4 on: August 11, 2010, 03:42:56 PM »
I think contacting the director about the work she needs to do for her degree sounds great.  She should use which ever method the director gave her as a contact, type up a note about what she needs to do for her degree and ask candidly about options with the company.  Much better than a receptionist position, and will look good on any future resume.

I would forget about the receptionist position unless money is the issue.