Author Topic: Rehoming an older cat  (Read 2139 times)

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camlan

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Re: Rehoming an older cat
« Reply #15 on: August 18, 2010, 03:57:51 PM »
If you do end up taking her with you, talk to your vet about tranquillizers for the trip.

Here's my story: I went to my vet's to meet a tiny barn kitten that someone had dropped off there. Didn't take to the kitten at all, but while I was there I noticed a large fluffy calico cat wandering around the room. When I asked about her, they told me that her owners had brought her in to be put to sleep, because they had a new baby who was very allergic to cats. The owners had spent months trying to find a new home for the cat, but no one wanted a 6 year old cat and they didn't think she would do well in a shelter. My vet offered to keep the cat for a month, to see if he could find a new home for her.

Cue my inability to hear a tale like that and not do something about it. Little Mo came home with me that day and for the next 14 years she ruled the house. Not a lap cat in the slightest and quite demanding, as well as being a champion shedder.

So my advice is to talk to your vet and if they can't help you, call other vets to see if they can offer any suggestions.

I've also looked after other people's cats in my home for up to a year. I got the cat; they got to live in France for a year.

In the long run, the cat might be less stressed out to move with you and be with people she knows, than to move to a new home with strangers.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


wolfie

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Re: Rehoming an older cat
« Reply #16 on: August 18, 2010, 04:01:35 PM »
Okay - so old but probably has another good 5 - 10 years to look forward to. I have been looking at some of the rescues/shelters in WI and found this one:

http://www.happyendings.us/

"As many of our cats are strays or have been mistreated during their life, some of them are quite shy and considered 'unadoptable' by other shelters.  Therefore, we have a socialization program, where our volunteers work with these felines daily to build a trust of humans, offering a secure environment until they are ready to be adopted."

Seems like the specialize in Hard To Place cats.

Closer look at the website indicates cats not in foster homes are in cages so I don't know if you really want to go there, but if you call them they might have suggestions. I will keep looking to see if I can find something but I would suggest getting your friends/family to talk to their friends/family and see if anyone would be willing to take her until you are in a position where traveling is the only stressor or keep her if things work out. It seems like word of mouth is the best way to get a good home for an animal - especially a hard to place one.

cbcb

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Re: Rehoming an older cat
« Reply #17 on: August 18, 2010, 04:15:58 PM »
Unless you can actually find another home for her, dropping her at a shelter is almost certain death if she's not an immediately personable cat.  

I'd recommend getting a sedative for her from your vet, and take her with you.  If you confine her to one bedroom or bathroom, she'll get used to it, and then you can let her out into the rest of the house after you've unpacked.

Try to negotiate with landlords about your one cat.  Offer to pay a damage deposit.  You may have to give up some other things you want in an apartment so that you can get one that accepts pets.

All good advice, and I think the bolded in particular is a great idea.

As for "no pets", I'm in an area that often says that, but where landlords are flexible, especially when the pet in question is a single cat well past the "hyper" years.

xena2560

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Re: Rehoming an older cat
« Reply #18 on: August 18, 2010, 04:17:55 PM »
Has this cat been moved before?  

- I have a cat who was adopted from a shelter.  She was surrendered as part of a move.  The first time I had to move apartments, she was freaked (to the tune of me having to blare the pogues in order to keep people from calling the cops to claim i was torturing an animal in my care).  Once I got her into the house, she was mellow.  She now travels back and forth with me to my apartment and my parents home and is a-ok with it.

- I wouldn't say the cat is skittish because she hates the vacuum cleaner.  Mine hates it to.  I think the loud whirring gets on their nerves, and that manifests as fear.

Personally, I'd take her with me, if dropping her off with your MIL isn't an option.  But I don't know the cat personally.

xena2560

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Re: Rehoming an older cat
« Reply #19 on: August 18, 2010, 04:19:50 PM »
Oh yeah- ditto on explaining the situation to the landlords.  If she's been declawed, especially, they may say "that doesn't count as an animal" (happened to me when I was looking for an apartment).  Most of those rules are to prevent people from bringing in yippy dogs.  Sometimes, you may be asked to do an "interview", where they make sure that you're not bringing in Catzilla from Mouse Hunt.

BuffaloFang

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Re: Rehoming an older cat
« Reply #20 on: August 18, 2010, 04:22:55 PM »
Another resource for finding a home is http://www.petfinder.com/classifieds/classifieds.html

wolfie

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Re: Rehoming an older cat
« Reply #21 on: August 18, 2010, 04:37:32 PM »
Here is another one:

http://www.giveshelter.org/sitemgr/rehome_a_pet

"Pets whose owners can no longer care for them can have their pictures and bios posted on Dane County Humane Society's rehoming web database. This service is free for owners who seek new homes for pets and want to work directly with potential adopters. DCHS requires pet owners and potential adopters to register to help ensure the service is not abused."

mikeylou

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Re: Rehoming an older cat
« Reply #22 on: August 18, 2010, 05:06:24 PM »
I moved from the East Coast to the SouthWest almost 3 years ago.  We had to find new homes for 8 of our cats (yes, we had 10 in the house.  Never again!) and it was very difficult.  I thought that my 12-13 year old very skittish and mostly antisocial cat would be terrified on the car trip and would have a difficult time adjusting.  I tried to find a new home for him, but no one wants a 12 year old cat - it's just too "old", and they do not want to deal with age-related vet bills.  As it was, when I adopted him from the shelter in 98, he was 3 and had been there for almost 6 months.

I took him with me.  Just me and him, on the wide open highway.  [We'd moved the other two a couple months earlier.]  He'd be noisy when I put him in the kennel, but he'd calm down and ride out the trip with me.  Finding him the next morning was always fun - it's amazing how a B&W cat can blend into things.  I tried to put a harness on him before we started the trip - so he'd be easier to grab, but he was having None Of That and laid into my hand.  We played "catch me" while on the road in the motel room, but once caught, he wouldn't wriggle and scratch, just meekly get into the kennel.

He adapted to the new place just fine.  There was some cat-hierarchy issues, but they sorted themselves out.  He ruled the upstairs and the other two ruled the downstairs. 

He was a perfectly healthy 13 year old cat when we moved and he was happy with his new environs.  I think if I'd found some place else for him to live he'd be really unhappy with new people.  He only really tolerated me, and even after 10 years with DH he would -sometimes- allow DH to give him an ear scritch, but ONLY if DH was sitting on the toilet.  DH was not allowed to approach him.

Just my experience.  Like I said, I originally thought he wouldn't weather the move and transport well, but he surprised me and it turned out to be the better decision.

It is just really hard to find a new home for an old cat.  Primarily because of possible vet expenses.  [Patches cost us almost $1 last year, which would have been more if we really wanted to find out the extent of his brain tumor.]  But they also do not want to feel responsible if nature claims your cat.

Look into Kitty-Valium if you take him.  I knew Patches would be mostly OK since it was us on the road.  But if I had to fly with him he'd have been freaking out for all 9 hours.