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Author Topic: Dropping the F bomb  (Read 5656 times)

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wheeitsme

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Re: Dropping the F bomb
« Reply #30 on: September 01, 2010, 10:51:29 AM »
I thikn it depends what "report it" means.  If "report it" means tell his superiors so he gets in trouble and/or loses his job then probably not.  If "report it" means bring to their attention the fact that their seems to be a lack of awareness or sensitivity to what might offend prospspective recruits then I think it shuold be reported.  This young man also tried to tell a joke that for whatever reaosn didn't scan well so maybe he would benefit from some training/insight on how to read his audience.  That wouldn't be punishment but rather might be beneficila in this and other positions.

This.


Also, casual cursing is probably not a good idea around someone you have just met that you are charged with trying to impress.

SportsFan88

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Re: Dropping the F bomb
« Reply #31 on: September 01, 2010, 11:23:04 AM »
A couple of people had mentioned trying to impress the guest in the room. During recruiting visits, you are trying to find out if the fit is good for both the team and the athlete (it's almost like a job interview). It would be unproductive to have the girl agree to go to school there, realize when she is a member of the team that she will hear the occasional curse word, and have her transfer. From an athletic department standpoint, that's not productive for anyone. I'd much rather something like this happen on a recruiting visit and her realize that that is not the place for her now.

I work in oil and gas. If I reported every f-word I heard each day, I'd get about an hour of actual work done. I expect college athletics is like that, but squared.

And yes Juana, college athletics is something like that.

Well behaved women rarely make history ~ Laurel Thatcher Ulrich
America is the land of opportunity, not entitlement.

wheeitsme

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Re: Dropping the F bomb
« Reply #32 on: September 01, 2010, 12:22:39 PM »
A couple of people had mentioned trying to impress the guest in the room. During recruiting visits, you are trying to find out if the fit is good for both the team and the athlete (it's almost like a job interview).

<snip>

Today I had a 'campus prospect' brought to tour our department by the Athletics department. This happens a few times a year, and the context is that the Athletics department is hoping to recruit this student-athlete, so we are supposed to be as congenial as possible when talking to them about their prospective major.

<snip>

And in this case, the entity being "interviewed" appeared to be the University.  I believe that casual cursing, especially that word, when you don't know a person and when you are charged with impressing them, is probably not a positive influence, and might very well be a negative one.  Not a good idea if you are the entity trying to initiate the working relationship.

SportsFan88

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Re: Dropping the F bomb
« Reply #33 on: September 01, 2010, 12:29:16 PM »
A couple of people had mentioned trying to impress the guest in the room. During recruiting visits, you are trying to find out if the fit is good for both the team and the athlete (it's almost like a job interview).

<snip>

Today I had a 'campus prospect' brought to tour our department by the Athletics department. This happens a few times a year, and the context is that the Athletics department is hoping to recruit this student-athlete, so we are supposed to be as congenial as possible when talking to them about their prospective major.

<snip>

And in this case, the entity being "interviewed" appeared to be the University.  I believe that casual cursing, especially that word, when you don't know a person and when you are charged with impressing them, is probably not a positive influence, and might very well be a negative one.  Not a good idea if you are the entity trying to initiate the working rel@tionship.

I don't know of any job interviews that work one way. At the end of the day, both parties need to be comfortable for a relationship to work - and it's the same with student-athletes and coaches. We've heard numerous stories on here from people who turned down jobs because they felt that they weren't a good fit for the organization. In this case, if the girl was uncomfortable, it was good for her to know that before she accepted to go to school. The coaches have plenty of opportunity to go find someone else who will fit in better with their team.

Well behaved women rarely make history ~ Laurel Thatcher Ulrich
America is the land of opportunity, not entitlement.

wheeitsme

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  • Posts: 3821
Re: Dropping the F bomb
« Reply #34 on: September 01, 2010, 12:56:38 PM »
A couple of people had mentioned trying to impress the guest in the room. During recruiting visits, you are trying to find out if the fit is good for both the team and the athlete (it's almost like a job interview).

<snip>

Today I had a 'campus prospect' brought to tour our department by the Athletics department. This happens a few times a year, and the context is that the Athletics department is hoping to recruit this student-athlete, so we are supposed to be as congenial as possible when talking to them about their prospective major.

<snip>

And in this case, the entity being "interviewed" appeared to be the University.  I believe that casual cursing, especially that word, when you don't know a person and when you are charged with impressing them, is probably not a positive influence, and might very well be a negative one.  Not a good idea if you are the entity trying to initiate the working rel@tionship.

I don't know of any job interviews that work one way. At the end of the day, both parties need to be comfortable for a rel@tionship to work - and it's the same with student-athletes and coaches. We've heard numerous stories on here from people who turned down jobs because they felt that they weren't a good fit for the organization. In this case, if the girl was uncomfortable, it was good for her to know that before she accepted to go to school. The coaches have plenty of opportunity to go find someone else who will fit in better with their team.

I respectfully disagree.  Even if cursing is socially acceptable in some places and job areas, there are still times and places that it is not.  

My brother worked in the construction field. Yes, there is a lot of cursing.  He also taught construction engineering in a university.  He did not curse in class.  Even though his students would be exposed to it in their future working environment.  It wasn't the appropriate time or place.  

In the OP's situation, this isn't a situation where they were trying to weed people out who might not fit.  The school has actively decided that they want this person in their sports program.  And this person was charged with making the prospect want to choose this particular school.  Using possibly offensive words in this situation is innappropriate.  That might even be what made the prospect wince.  Not the actual word, but the use of the word in that situation.  

Sharnita

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Re: Dropping the F bomb
« Reply #35 on: September 01, 2010, 01:19:05 PM »
OP, you have not indicated that profanity and/or obscenity is standard or common in these types of interactions, though many people seem to believe that they must be.  WOuld it be the norm to sue this type of language in this type of cirumstance or was the young man departing from the type or dialouge expected of him and of yourself?

SportsFan88

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Re: Dropping the F bomb
« Reply #36 on: September 01, 2010, 02:08:46 PM »
A couple of people had mentioned trying to impress the guest in the room. During recruiting visits, you are trying to find out if the fit is good for both the team and the athlete (it's almost like a job interview).

<snip>

Today I had a 'campus prospect' brought to tour our department by the Athletics department. This happens a few times a year, and the context is that the Athletics department is hoping to recruit this student-athlete, so we are supposed to be as congenial as possible when talking to them about their prospective major.

<snip>

And in this case, the entity being "interviewed" appeared to be the University.  I believe that casual cursing, especially that word, when you don't know a person and when you are charged with impressing them, is probably not a positive influence, and might very well be a negative one.  Not a good idea if you are the entity trying to initiate the working rel@tionship.

I don't know of any job interviews that work one way. At the end of the day, both parties need to be comfortable for a rel@tionship to work - and it's the same with student-athletes and coaches. We've heard numerous stories on here from people who turned down jobs because they felt that they weren't a good fit for the organization. In this case, if the girl was uncomfortable, it was good for her to know that before she accepted to go to school. The coaches have plenty of opportunity to go find someone else who will fit in better with their team.

I respectfully disagree.  Even if cursing is socially acceptable in some places and job areas, there are still times and places that it is not.  

My brother worked in the construction field. Yes, there is a lot of cursing.  He also taught construction engineering in a university.  He did not curse in class.  Even though his students would be exposed to it in their future working environment.  It wasn't the appropriate time or place.  

In the OP's situation, this isn't a situation where they were trying to weed people out who might not fit.  The school has actively decided that they want this person in their sports program.  And this person was charged with making the prospect want to choose this particular school.  Using possibly offensive words in this situation is innappropriate.  That might even be what made the prospect wince.  Not the actual word, but the use of the word in that situation.  


While you make some good points, I have to respectfully disagree with the bolded. There are plenty of times that a school may stop recruiting an athlete (or even pull a scholarship offer), and poor fit is one of them.

I'm not advocating that he should have cursed, and I agree that in general that a school is trying to impress recruits. But I maintain that if it was going to be a poor fit, better for both parties to find this out now than later.

Well behaved women rarely make history ~ Laurel Thatcher Ulrich
America is the land of opportunity, not entitlement.

wheeitsme

  • Member
  • Posts: 3821
Re: Dropping the F bomb
« Reply #37 on: September 01, 2010, 05:16:04 PM »
A couple of people had mentioned trying to impress the guest in the room. During recruiting visits, you are trying to find out if the fit is good for both the team and the athlete (it's almost like a job interview).

<snip>

Today I had a 'campus prospect' brought to tour our department by the Athletics department. This happens a few times a year, and the context is that the Athletics department is hoping to recruit this student-athlete, so we are supposed to be as congenial as possible when talking to them about their prospective major.

<snip>

And in this case, the entity being "interviewed" appeared to be the University.  I believe that casual cursing, especially that word, when you don't know a person and when you are charged with impressing them, is probably not a positive influence, and might very well be a negative one.  Not a good idea if you are the entity trying to initiate the working rel@tionship.

I don't know of any job interviews that work one way. At the end of the day, both parties need to be comfortable for a rel@tionship to work - and it's the same with student-athletes and coaches. We've heard numerous stories on here from people who turned down jobs because they felt that they weren't a good fit for the organization. In this case, if the girl was uncomfortable, it was good for her to know that before she accepted to go to school. The coaches have plenty of opportunity to go find someone else who will fit in better with their team.

I respectfully disagree.  Even if cursing is socially acceptable in some places and job areas, there are still times and places that it is not.  

My brother worked in the construction field. Yes, there is a lot of cursing.  He also taught construction engineering in a university.  He did not curse in class.  Even though his students would be exposed to it in their future working environment.  It wasn't the appropriate time or place.  

In the OP's situation, this isn't a situation where they were trying to weed people out who might not fit.  The school has actively decided that they want this person in their sports program.  And this person was charged with making the prospect want to choose this particular school.  Using possibly offensive words in this situation is innappropriate.  That might even be what made the prospect wince.  Not the actual word, but the use of the word in that situation.  


While you make some good points, I have to respectfully disagree with the bolded. There are plenty of times that a school may stop recruiting an athlete (or even pull a scholarship offer), and poor fit is one of them.

I'm not advocating that he should have cursed, and I agree that in general that a school is trying to impress recruits. But I maintain that if it was going to be a poor fit, better for both parties to find this out now than later.

(bolded) That is true.

Onyx_TKD

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Re: Dropping the F bomb
« Reply #38 on: September 01, 2010, 09:29:33 PM »
A couple of people had mentioned trying to impress the guest in the room. During recruiting visits, you are trying to find out if the fit is good for both the team and the athlete (it's almost like a job interview). It would be unproductive to have the girl agree to go to school there, realize when she is a member of the team that she will hear the occasional curse word, and have her transfer. From an athletic department standpoint, that's not productive for anyone. I'd much rather something like this happen on a recruiting visit and her realize that that is not the place for her now.

I work in oil and gas. If I reported every f-word I heard each day, I'd get about an hour of actual work done. I expect college athletics is like that, but squared.

And yes Juana, college athletics is something like that.

You seem to be assuming that the recruit's discomfort with the F-bomb during the "interview" means she would be uncomfortable with cursing in the athletic department; I don't think that is necessarily true. (I'm not saying the guide should get into trouble, but I do think he messed up.)

Working with people who curse casually often doesn't bother me a bit (there are exceptions--some people do curse in a way that I find offensive, but barring racial or religious slurs, it's usually not the words themselves that bothers me), but I would judge cursing during the interview much more harshly than cursing during the normal workday. What is presented during the interview is supposed to be the organization's best face--if the interviewer cannot recognize that an interview requires different behavior than a normal day and behave accordingly, then that doesn't give me high hopes for the quality of the organization.

Also, note that this incident did not take place while she was touring the athletic department--it took place in the OP's department. No matter how accepted it is for the athletes to swear among themselves, they ought to be able to modify their behavior when they are outside of that environment--citing athletic department norms would be no excuse for dropping the F-bomb in a conversation with the math professor, for instance. If the recruit had been in the athletic department's facilities, conversing informally with the student athletes, then her reaction to a casual curse might be more telling. As it was, she was touring a different department, a different setting where athletic dept. norms are not in effect, and her guide demonstrated a disregard for what was inappropriate in that setting.