Author Topic: ID Badges Worn Backwards  (Read 8917 times)

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567Kate

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Re: ID Badges Worn Backwards
« Reply #60 on: September 15, 2010, 11:35:43 AM »
The hospitals I've been stationed at (all two of them) both had a policy of displaying your ID badge, but the badges just had picture, first name + last initial, and job title.  I think you can definitely ask the people caring for you what their name and job title are.  That should be a question they are happy to answer, especially in a clinic where wearing name tags backward is apparently "the norm." 

I also think you can mention it on your client satisfaction survey.  They are intended for that kind of feedback, I'd imagine.

This seems like the perfect solution. The hospital workers get some privacy, but the patient knows who's doing what without having to ask.

I agree with mentioning it on the survey.

Twik

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Re: ID Badges Worn Backwards
« Reply #61 on: September 15, 2010, 11:40:16 AM »
In a perfect world, medical professionals, as well as others who work with the public, should be able to give their full names without fear of attracting whackaloons.

Alas, it is not a perfect world.
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Rosey

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Re: ID Badges Worn Backwards
« Reply #62 on: September 15, 2010, 04:08:32 PM »
I guess I don't understand why you can't just ask the person. If someone is changing your bed sheets or bringing in basic non-medicinal supplies, you probably don't need much information about them personally. If someone is going to stick a needle in your arm or change a bag on your IV, I think it's safe to ask them. You can get the information you need, and they don't have to display this information to the world.

Why is that so bad?

Because that puts one extra burden on someone who is sick, exhausted, frightened, alone and in pain.  Because hearing it isn't as useful  as seeing it.  Because sometimes you get a defensive, suspicious response to the question. 


If you are sick, exhausted, frightened, alone, and in pain, you are not likely to do much better with a visual id than you are with a verbal explanation. If you are so laid up that you can't ask and retain the information, you probably aren't in the best position to do something with the information anyway. In an emergency, I admit, this causes problems. If it's a planned surgery or other medical procedure, you can talk to your doctor or the hospital ahead of time to find out who handles what kind of treatments.

If you get a defensive or suspicious response to the question, take it up with a supervisor.

However, I think to a certain extent this falls under the category of trusting the establishment with which you've entrusted your care. I generally assume that the person giving me medicine or sticking me with needles has the appropriate qualifications to do so. It's one thing to ask a name, but when you are asking about a person's title, I sort of wonder what you're going to do with the information.

I just think a medical professional has enough concerns with making sure each patient gets the proper care, and it's the hospital administration's responsibility to make sure the right personnel are performing the right tasks.

Oy, this is getting long. Let me make my opinion much clearer:

A medical professional owes me safe, quality care because that's what I paid for. I did not pay for their last name, and I have no right to it. What would I do with the information? I did not pay to know each person's job title, and I wouldn't know whether or not an LPN could perform something or if it would require an RN anyway. I might like to know their first name, but that's because I think it's only respectful to know the name of the person who is helping me.

camlan

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Re: ID Badges Worn Backwards
« Reply #63 on: September 15, 2010, 04:36:58 PM »


However, I think to a certain extent this falls under the category of trusting the establishment with which you've entrusted your care. I generally assume that the person giving me medicine or sticking me with needles has the appropriate qualifications to do so. It's one thing to ask a name, but when you are asking about a person's title, I sort of wonder what you're going to do with the information.


My dad was in the hospital for several weeks, due to an infection after hip surgery. One of the symptoms of the infection was that he appeared to have dementia, even though he really didn't. I was there daily, acting as his advocate. Someone (RN? LPN? I have no idea.) would come in during the morning and give Dad his medications, not for the infection, but the asthma and allergy and high blood pressure meds that he took regularly. After a day or two, I asked why they weren't giving Dad his asthma inhaler, which he required twice a day. "Oh, the respiritory therapists have to do that," was the answer. "But he's getting it. Here it is!" And they'd fish it out of the medication drawer and show it to me. Even after I started questioning that fact that he didn't appear to ever have gotten the inhaler, because I never, ever saw anyone give it to him, everyone I asked kept assuring me that he had. I asked people to check his record, and they disappeared and then came back and told me it was okay. I guess RT must only come when I'm home or in the ladies' room.

Dad didn't get his inhaler for 10 days. It wasn't until he started having breathing problems that someone actually checked and discovered that no order had been sent to RT to give him the inhaler.

I complained about this, but was unable to give the hospital authorities a single name, or even whether the people telling me everything was okay were RNs, LPNs or aides. There were multiple people in and out of his room daily, and they mostly worked three shifts a week, so it was hard to get to know who was who, when you couldn't read their badges because the font size was so small. I was able to give them the name of his hospitalist, who was one of those who supposedly checked his record to make sure he was getting the inhaler. Had I been able to read the badges, I would have known more surely that no RT was entering Dad's room. Had I know that the RT's all wore red scrubs, I would have known that they weren't entering Dad's room.

After that, I started asking for names and titles, and wrote them down. I'm sure it annoyed lots of people, but at that point, I really didn't care who was annoyed, as long as Dad got the proper care.
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ClaireC79

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Re: ID Badges Worn Backwards
« Reply #64 on: September 15, 2010, 05:02:58 PM »
A medical professional owes me safe, quality care because that's what I paid for. I did not pay for their last name, and I have no right to it. What would I do with the information?

You could look them up to see that they are actually registered (though I was a bit put out when someone did that to everyone who had been caring for them)

Onyx_TKD

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Re: ID Badges Worn Backwards
« Reply #65 on: September 15, 2010, 06:33:35 PM »
I guess I don't understand why you can't just ask the person. If someone is changing your bed sheets or bringing in basic non-medicinal supplies, you probably don't need much information about them personally. If someone is going to stick a needle in your arm or change a bag on your IV, I think it's safe to ask them. You can get the information you need, and they don't have to display this information to the world.

Why is that so bad?

Because that puts one extra burden on someone who is sick, exhausted, frightened, alone and in pain.  Because hearing it isn't as useful  as seeing it.  Because sometimes you get a defensive, suspicious response to the question. 


If you are sick, exhausted, frightened, alone, and in pain, you are not likely to do much better with a visual id than you are with a verbal explanation. If you are so laid up that you can't ask and retain the information, you probably aren't in the best position to do something with the information anyway. In an emergency, I admit, this causes problems. If it's a planned surgery or other medical procedure, you can talk to your doctor or the hospital ahead of time to find out who handles what kind of treatments.

If you get a defensive or suspicious response to the question, take it up with a supervisor.

However, I think to a certain extent this falls under the category of trusting the establishment with which you've entrusted your care. I generally assume that the person giving me medicine or sticking me with needles has the appropriate qualifications to do so. It's one thing to ask a name, but when you are asking about a person's title, I sort of wonder what you're going to do with the information.

I just think a medical professional has enough concerns with making sure each patient gets the proper care, and it's the hospital administration's responsibility to make sure the right personnel are performing the right tasks.

Oy, this is getting long. Let me make my opinion much clearer:

A medical professional owes me safe, quality care because that's what I paid for. I did not pay for their last name, and I have no right to it. What would I do with the information? I did not pay to know each person's job title, and I wouldn't know whether or not an LPN could perform something or if it would require an RN anyway. I might like to know their first name, but that's because I think it's only respectful to know the name of the person who is helping me.

Asking for the job title doesn't mean the patient is trying to get the employee in trouble or that they don't trust the employee to do their jobs properly.

One reason that the job title is relevant is so questions can be directed at the right person. E.g. if I have a question about my physical therapy regimen, then the phlebotomist probably isn't the right person to ask. Also, someone might prefer to ask their question of an RN or doctor rather than someone with less training--sure, anyone who doesn't know the answer ought to admit that and refer the question to someone else, but why not just ask the qualified person to start with?

The major reason for names is so an employee can be identified later if needed. E.g. If the patient says "Oh, I thought Susie B. already gave me that medication before lunch," then the nurse can go ask Susie B. if she already gave the medication to avoid accidentally doubling the dose, whereas "Oh, but I already had that medication...Well, it was a woman with brown hair?...Kinda short?...Um, she had teddy bears on her scrubs?" requires the nurse to play a guessing game in trying to find the right one. Not to mention that if the short, brown-haired nurse with teddy bear scrubs says she didn't give the medicine, then there's still a question--was the medication never given, or did the patient see a different short, brown-haired nurse with teddy bear scrubs.

Note that this does not require knowing the employees' full names--it doesn't even require knowing their real names. "Susie B." might really be Jane Smith, but as long as she is always "Susie B." on the job, and the other employees and hospital administration can identify who "Susie B." is, then I really don't care what her real name is. I just want a name that clearly identifies the employee and that I can use to address or identify that employee.

Clara Bow

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Re: ID Badges Worn Backwards
« Reply #66 on: September 15, 2010, 07:00:30 PM »
My rackin'-frackin' ID holder will flip around every time I move. I can't let it go though because it has a stretchy cord that unspools if I pull on it so it's good for ID swipe-entry doors. I turn it back around when I notice that it's twisted because I like for people to know my name....it beats having someone yell "NURSE!" or "HEY, YOU!"
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Clara Bow

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Re: ID Badges Worn Backwards
« Reply #67 on: September 15, 2010, 07:12:45 PM »
I guess I don't understand why you can't just ask the person. If someone is changing your bed sheets or bringing in basic non-medicinal supplies, you probably don't need much information about them personally. If someone is going to stick a needle in your arm or change a bag on your IV, I think it's safe to ask them. You can get the information you need, and they don't have to display this information to the world.

Why is that so bad?

Because that puts one extra burden on someone who is sick, exhausted, frightened, alone and in pain.  Because hearing it isn't as useful  as seeing it.  Because sometimes you get a defensive, suspicious response to the question.  


On occasion I have pinch-hitted for a coworker, which means I am walking into a patient room for the first time with fluids, drugs etc. Nametag visible or not I will say "Are you Demarco (using then OP shamelessly here). My name is Auntie Venom, I'm one of the other nurses on the floor. 'Insert name here' is busy at the moment and asked me to bring you the pain meds (etc) that you called for."

It's more than just "I want to be able to read your nametag before you touch me, drug me, etc". It's about basic courtesy. I'd rather have a verbal introduction than just reading  the nametag.

Sometimes LPNs, techs etc do get their hackles up when asked if they are RNs because there are people who act like RNs are the only people in patient care who know anything, or are better than tech, LPNs etc are or something. I can tell you that nothing could be further from the truth, but not everyone believes that. I think that they should give you the benefit of the doubt before snapping off though.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2010, 08:45:04 PM by Auntie Venom »
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Rosey

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Re: ID Badges Worn Backwards
« Reply #68 on: September 15, 2010, 07:34:22 PM »
On occasion I have pinch-hitted for a coworker, which means I am walking into a patient room for the first time with fluids, drugs etc. Nametag visible or not I will say "Are you Demarco (using then OP shamelessly here). My name is Auntie Venom, I'm one of the other nurses on the floor. 'Insert name here' is busy at the moment and asked me to bring you the pain meds (etc) that you called for."

It's more than just "I want to be able to read your nametag before you touch me, drug me, etc. It's about basic courtesy. I'd rather have a verbal introduction than just reading  the nametag.

Sometimes LPNs, techs etc do get their hackles up when asked if they are RNs because there are people who act like RNs are the only people in patient care who know anything, or are better than tech, LPNs etc are or something. I can tell you that nothing could be further from the truth, but not everyone believes that. I think that they should give you the benefit of the doubt beofre snapping off though.

This makes sense. I like to have the first name of people working on me, but mostly because I think that is a basic courtesy. I don't want to be Patient #555 anymore than I want the person administering medicine or seeing me half naked to be "lady with duckie scrubs."  ;) Personally, a first name is all I need for this.

Dindrane

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Re: ID Badges Worn Backwards
« Reply #69 on: September 15, 2010, 08:10:52 PM »
It is important to be able to trust the establishment that is providing you care, especially for health care.  That's true of any industry, or any part of the health care industry.  But I do think it is a very valid point that a very important part of building trust is establishing transparency.  I am much more likely to trust that I am getting good care when all the people I interact with are free with information whenever they can be.

Seeing someone wear a name tag with their title, even if all it said was, "Jane S., RN" would inspire a heck of a lot more confidence than a badge that appears to be intentionally turned so that I cannot read it.  There are lots of ways to avoid disseminating information that do not give the appearance of concealment or guilt.  There are also a lot of ways to avoid disseminating information that make you look like you're hiding something.


Clara Bow

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Re: ID Badges Worn Backwards
« Reply #70 on: September 15, 2010, 08:50:20 PM »
Our nametags have our first and last names and position. The last name is smaller and the first name is bold text and larger print. I know a lot of the people in the ER and in the behavioral health center are advised to cover their last names (we had to in school when we did psych) because there are seriously dangerous people in those areas. But if you're not comfortable with your last name being known you can cover it with a nursing school grad pin, a glittery sticker, etc. Most med staff outside of docs are on first name terms with their patients. I call you "Mrs/Mr/Miss/Ms Lastname", you call me "Firstname". There's no reason to call me "Mrs Lastname". I never ask for that from people anyway.

I just think that a verbal introduction to anyone beats having to only read it off the nametag. I think it's rude to walk into someone's room to do anything at all without saying who you are and what your position is when you work in the hospital.
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Re: ID Badges Worn Backwards
« Reply #71 on: September 15, 2010, 10:55:29 PM »
Are there any *doctors* whose nametags display first names? Or is it all "G. House, M.D." and "M. Grey, M.D."? I'm guessing the latter.

I was a nurse's aide in the '70s and about the same time I knew some nursing students. My nametag read "B. Lastname, N.A." My nursing student friends were addressed by their teachers as "Miss _____." (I didn't happen to know any male, or married female nursing students). On the floor, the nurses wore nametags like mine: "M. Smith, R.N.," "J. Doe, L.P.N." We -- nurses and aides alike -- were free to introduce ourselves to patients as Mary or "Ms. Jones, your nurse" or Nurse Doe or however we saw fit. Among co-workers, first names were used, with exceptions for people in authority (as a nurse's aide, I'd call the head nurse on my floor "Ann," but the director of nursing "Mrs. Jones.")

Maybe it's my age/curmudgeonly streak showing, but I miss the days when doctors, nurses, ancillary personnel and patients all addressed one another by courtesy titles and last names. When it comes to patients, I know that HIPAA has a lot to do with the trend toward first-naming. But part of me thinks there was a lot more respect and dignity across the board when Courtesy Title/Last Name was more ubiquitous in medicine, and medical professionals had more of a choice. But that's a reflection on the informalization of society in general, not just the medical profession.
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miranova

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Re: ID Badges Worn Backwards
« Reply #72 on: September 15, 2010, 11:57:24 PM »
It is important to be able to trust the establishment that is providing you care, especially for health care.  That's true of any industry, or any part of the health care industry.  But I do think it is a very valid point that a very important part of building trust is establishing transparency.  I am much more likely to trust that I am getting good care when all the people I interact with are free with information whenever they can be.

Seeing someone wear a name tag with their title, even if all it said was, "Jane S., RN" would inspire a heck of a lot more confidence than a badge that appears to be intentionally turned so that I cannot read it.  There are lots of ways to avoid disseminating information that do not give the appearance of concealment or guilt.  There are also a lot of ways to avoid disseminating information that make you look like you're hiding something.

Total, 100% pod.  I don't apologize for wanting to know the level of training that someone has.  It is a perfectly reasonable thing to want to know.  And I don't think I should have to hunt for it or deal with employees asking "why do you want to know?" or getting defensive.  It's a reasonable thing to want to know.

I think I deserve to know who is working on my physical body at all times.   I am 100% NOT comfortable with any kind of system where someone can give me drugs but I can't know their name or what their qualifications are.

I don't have any ill will toward nurses who are told to do this and are just following orders, but I think it is bad policy. 

Danismom

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Re: ID Badges Worn Backwards
« Reply #73 on: September 16, 2010, 01:24:56 AM »
The hospital I work in changed our badges about a 18 months ago.  Our badges now have the hospital logo, a photo, first name, certification (if any) and department.  The way our badges are set up we have 2 of the badge described above which sandwiches the other materials on our badge holder.  That way, no matter how our badges turn, they are always facing out.  Previously they also listed our last names -- in normal font size on one side and tiny font size on the other. 

I am very glad that they switched our badges for our safety.  Patients should be able to see my first name and department.  I only want them to have my last name if I give it to them.  We are a trauma center.  I don't want a gangbanger to have my information when he's ticked that I wouldn't tell him about his target.  I also don't want someone who tried to assault/kill their spouse to have my last name when I protected their spouse while we worked on keeping them alive.

For the OP,  I suggest talking with your physician in advance and then with the hospital when you preregister.  Talk with management while you are there also if needed.  Tell them that you are anxious about your procedure and that it would really help you be more comfortable with the care you will be receiving if staff would introduce themselves with their first name and credential/department each time they came in the room.  Also ask your doctor's office if the hospital has a color code for scrubs.  Then you'd know that the green scrubs are RNs, beige are LVNs, red are Respiratory, etc.  If the staff isn't introducing themselves in the way you'd like right off the bat, I'd first ask them their name and position.  Then call them by name at least once if you can manage it so that it seems more conversational than interrogational, kwim?  If you are still having problems talk to the charge nurse or nurse manager for the unit you are on.  If you expect you'll get a survey, let them know what they need to do to give you exceptional service.  Hopefully they will rise to the opportunity.

Kiara

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Re: ID Badges Worn Backwards
« Reply #74 on: September 16, 2010, 09:36:30 AM »
Are there any *doctors* whose nametags display first names? Or is it all "G. House, M.D." and "M. Grey, M.D."? I'm guessing the latter.

Ours do.  Every badge for the hospital I work under has the person's picture on the left, their full name across the bottom in large print, and their department on the right.  There's also a color code, but it's mainly to determine the bigger group you work for.  Everyone from the hospital CEO down to the receptionist over to the finance department has the same layout.

And like Auntie Venom...they're usually on retractable holders, and flip around like there's no tomorrow.