Author Topic: Anyone here with an English degree?  (Read 1138 times)

1 Member and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

White Dragon

  • Formerly St Monica
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2590
Re: Anyone here with an English degree?
« Reply #15 on: November 24, 2014, 02:03:17 PM »
Not an English degree but History.

However, I have taken a range of supplemental courses in writing for publication, technical writing, staff writing, plans writing, and similar.
I also have a teaching degree and have published some small articles.

I have moved away from teaching and am trying to put my admin and writing skills to work.
I recently started working as a freelance technical writer.
I'll know in a couple of weeks whether I get my first contract or not.  8)

I always thought I'd prefer creative fiction, but I've discovered I like research and writing user documents.
Like anything else, we evolve as writers.

DanaJ

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 279
Re: Anyone here with an English degree?
« Reply #16 on: November 24, 2014, 02:36:43 PM »
My ex has an English degree and has been a project manager with various IT companies for about 15 years now.

jpcher

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8737
Re: Anyone here with an English degree?
« Reply #17 on: November 24, 2014, 04:51:45 PM »
I do not have an English degree, nor am I a writer of any sorts. But I do work with English degreed/writer types of people.

I am job hunting, mainly focusing on technical writing.

If technical writing is your forte, look into proposal writing fields. Writing proposals for large companies going for multi-million dollar contracts is huge, lucrative and important.



eta: On the flip side, what about employee communications?
« Last Edit: November 24, 2014, 05:01:37 PM by jpcher »

Bookgirl

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1502
  • Read The Hunger Games. Trust me.
    • Zo- Be Designs
Re: Anyone here with an English degree?
« Reply #18 on: November 24, 2014, 06:58:17 PM »
BA in Creative Writing with a minor in Literature.  I managed a bookstore for five years after graduating.  For the past 13 years, I've worked for a book distributor.
RIP to my blog

I play with paper, scissors and glue and this is where I Facebook about it:
http://www.facebook.com/ZoBeDesigns

my cards and papergoods: www.ZoBeDesigns.etsy.com

Miss Understood

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1283
Re: Anyone here with an English degree?
« Reply #19 on: November 24, 2014, 07:14:23 PM »
Another English major here (B.A.).  I was an office manager for two different small software consulting firms (one branched out from the other) and in that role did everything from HR to accounting to editing our promotional materials and customer communications to technical writing (the manuals for applications our consultants developed).

The variety was interesting, but after a while I wanted to have a career with more of a specific focus so I became a paralegal.  After a few years of that I realized I really wanted to be an attorney so I entered law school at night, and now I am happily employed as a transactional attorney in a large corporate legal department.

From the varied responses here I think it's clear that an English degree can be what you make of it.  It annoys me when people joke about liberal arts majors practicing their "do you want fries with that?" skills.  Many employers recognize that such degrees produce well-educated and well-rounded people who are good at looking at the big picture and being adaptable.

Congratulations on your achievement!

Pie Fight

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 72
Re: Anyone here with an English degree?
« Reply #20 on: November 24, 2014, 08:45:42 PM »
I have a B.A. in English, and I am a technical writer. I work in the IT department at a large company. And no, I do not have any formal IT training. I couldn't program my way out of a box.  :)  But I've learned to speak some of the language.

Feel free to PM me if you want more information about technical communication, and congratulations on earning your degree!

camlan

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8728
Re: Anyone here with an English degree?
« Reply #21 on: November 24, 2014, 10:23:33 PM »
Also, an English undergrad degree isn't bad if you want to go to law school. (Just throwing this out for people other than the OP who might be considering a law degree.)

Lawyers have to know how to read and write well. And analyzing literature helps to develop critical thinking skills.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


ChinaShepherdess

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 122
  • “Never bet your money on another man's game.”
Re: Anyone here with an English degree?
« Reply #22 on: November 24, 2014, 10:33:48 PM »
I graduated with a BA in Russian Languages and Literatures and a minor in Creative Writing, then applied for jobs in publishing while working as a tutor and secretary for three years. The job market was really horrible at the time -- I graduated tight at the start of the Great Recession. After a few years, I was ready for school again, and got an MFA in creative writing. Now I adjunct in composition and actually still do SAT tutoring on the side, because I find it super fun and rewarding.

dirtyweasel

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1434
  • Just keep swimming, just keep swimming...
Re: Anyone here with an English degree?
« Reply #23 on: November 25, 2014, 01:54:38 AM »
I graduated with a BA in English and I've worked a few jobs including administrative, assistant manager of a solar company, and working for an ambulance company.  I'm currently getting my BS in nursing because the jobs that I was qualified for were low-paying with little upward movement.  It didn't help that I never really took any computer classes while I was at university nor did it help that I graduated right at the beginning of the Great Recession.

To be honest, I regret getting a degree in English and wish I had pursued something that was more financially lucrative or at least something that I would have been passionate enough about to not mind the small paychecks.  I think one of the things about having an English degree is that there are so many paths available for you to take with the degree, but you just have to take the leap and pick a direction that you want to go in.  If you're interested in technical writing then definitely go that track and follow your passions. 



Flibbertigibbet

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 84
Re: Anyone here with an English degree?
« Reply #24 on: November 25, 2014, 09:17:08 AM »
I have an MA in English Literature and am a lawyer. In the UK you can do a year long course in law after a degree in another subject which then qualifies you to do the vocational courses to become a solicitor or a barrister (they are different), which then allows you to seek a training contract (solicitor) or pupillage (barrister) so that you can become a qualified lawyer. It adds a year to the process that law graduates have to go through, but at the end of it you are treated as if you completed a law degree.

jaxsue

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 10298
Re: Anyone here with an English degree?
« Reply #25 on: November 25, 2014, 09:29:12 AM »
I have a B.A. in English, and I am a technical writer. I work in the IT department at a large company. And no, I do not have any formal IT training. I couldn't program my way out of a box.  :)  But I've learned to speak some of the language.

Feel free to PM me if you want more information about technical communication, and congratulations on earning your degree!

For about 5 years I was the managing editor for a SQL Server magazine; IT on steroids.  :) I did learn a lot on the job, and at times I caught mistakes that the tech editor/author missed. However, I didn't know enough to take over the TE job. Sadly, the magazine was bought by another company and all of us lost those jobs.

jaxsue

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 10298
Re: Anyone here with an English degree?
« Reply #26 on: November 25, 2014, 09:30:07 AM »
I have an MA in English Literature and am a lawyer. In the UK you can do a year long course in law after a degree in another subject which then qualifies you to do the vocational courses to become a solicitor or a barrister (they are different), which then allows you to seek a training contract (solicitor) or pupillage (barrister) so that you can become a qualified lawyer. It adds a year to the process that law graduates have to go through, but at the end of it you are treated as if you completed a law degree.

That sounds great! I'm not sure if we have that here in the US, but honestly, there are many things the UK does better. This may be one of them.

katiescarlett

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1099
Re: Anyone here with an English degree?
« Reply #27 on: November 26, 2014, 06:58:31 PM »
Thanks for all the replies.  You all have definitely given me some ideas for job hunting!

gollymolly2

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2687
Re: Anyone here with an English degree?
« Reply #28 on: November 26, 2014, 08:46:31 PM »
I have an MA in English Literature and am a lawyer. In the UK you can do a year long course in law after a degree in another subject which then qualifies you to do the vocational courses to become a solicitor or a barrister (they are different), which then allows you to seek a training contract (solicitor) or pupillage (barrister) so that you can become a qualified lawyer. It adds a year to the process that law graduates have to go through, but at the end of it you are treated as if you completed a law degree.

That sounds great! I'm not sure if we have that here in the US, but honestly, there are many things the UK does better. This may be one of them.

Sorry to take us a little more off topic... 

Theoretically you can be admitted to the bar in some states if you do an apprenticeship program instead of law school (e.g. California - http://www.calbar.ca.gov/Public/Pamphlets/BecomingALawyer.aspx#2) but almost nobody does it for a variety of practical reasons.

Sharnita

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 21617
Re: Anyone here with an English degree?
« Reply #29 on: Yesterday at 12:26:06 PM »
I have an English degree.  I've taught but that is becoming less and less stable, at least in this region.