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  • January 17, 2018, 07:23:53 AM

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Author Topic: S/O: House Hunting Horrors!  (Read 389598 times)

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TeamBhakta

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Re: S/O: House Hunting Horrors!
« Reply #1785 on: December 13, 2017, 10:03:54 AM »
Quote
I really don't know how they moved around in the house before without breaking something.

My guess is that the family is wealthy enough for it to be their "dump it / store it" house. They probably have a cleaner main home down the street & the cluttered home is just for the collectibles & random purchases not currently displayed at the main house.

DanaJ

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Re: S/O: House Hunting Horrors!
« Reply #1786 on: December 13, 2017, 10:54:03 AM »
Actually I'm thinking that yes, that could be renovated into a nice house. Love the woods around it. But of course the renovation would probably cost twice as much as teardown and build fresh.
Iím not sure about either as I think thereís asbestos in that house. Many old houses in Australia contain asbestos and itís a pain to do anything with. An expensive pain.

That's what I was thinking too. They have a dropped ceiling which is also a hint that there could be water damage (and some of the dropped ceiling is hirrendously mildewed too) or other ceiling issues. When we were house hunting, you'd see dropped ceilings in a lot of older places where the plaster and lath was toast and the ceiling was crumbling. It was cheaper to put in the dropped ceiling than to deal with the bigger issue.

Dropped ceilings can also hide a lot of other bad stuff. We found asbestos insulation when we peered into one.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: S/O: House Hunting Horrors!
« Reply #1787 on: December 13, 2017, 11:49:28 AM »
Dropped ceilings are quite common in basements, though, to allow access to electrical and plumbing for the main floor of the house.  But even there, I'd still have a look to make sure they aren't hiding anything, since it is so easy to lift the tiles and peer in with a flashlight.

Dropped ceilings on main floors of the house?  Yeah, I'd definitely be wondering what they're hiding.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario

DanaJ

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Re: S/O: House Hunting Horrors!
« Reply #1788 on: December 15, 2017, 10:48:47 AM »
Dropped ceilings are quite common in basements, though, to allow access to electrical and plumbing for the main floor of the house.  But even there, I'd still have a look to make sure they aren't hiding anything, since it is so easy to lift the tiles and peer in with a flashlight.

Yes, it was the main floor drop-ceilings that I found suspicious. When you see them here anywhere but the basement, they're almost always masking issues with plaster and lath ceilings. You see them in older finished basements (like those that haven't been renovated since the 1970s or 80s), but they seem to be a lot less common now because they reduce valuable basement ceiling height.

In the last house we renovated, we didn't even drywall the basement ceiling. The beams were left exposed and everything (including ductwork) was painted with ceiling paint. It created the illusion that the ceiling is much higher than it is, so the basement feels bigger.