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  • March 01, 2015, 10:45:31 PM

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Poll

Your child completed a cooking project due the next day and then school was cancelled. What would you do?

Have child complete the project for the next day back to school
7 (5.6%)
Take a picture as "evidence" that project was completed, allow family to eat project, send the picture and a note to school
46 (36.8%)
Freeze the project and thaw it out for the next due date
34 (27.2%)
Chill out and wait for teacher instruction/ request
32 (25.6%)
Other - I'll tell you in my reply
6 (4.8%)

Total Members Voted: 125

Author Topic: Cooking project and school cancellation  (Read 2530 times)

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TheaterDiva1

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Re: Cooking project and school cancellation
« Reply #30 on: February 21, 2015, 11:10:35 PM »
I voted for photos as well... I believe that 1. They shouldn't have to redo their work - it wasn't their fault school was canceled, and 2. They should enjoy the fruits of their labor. If they freeze the food, it may not be as good, and that could make them look bad (again, not their fault). If the teacher makes them so it again, I'd say it's not possible and ask for a simpler, less time-sensitive project, like crafts or a paper - maybe demonstrate a dance from that country (they could so that anyway for extra credit if they want). In Brad's case, I'd also send in the recipes as further proof of his efforts.

NFPwife

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Re: Cooking project and school cancellation
« Reply #31 on: February 21, 2015, 11:21:46 PM »
I forgot to add that Brad also said to his mother that if the teacher requires them to do it again he will pay for the ingredients from his allowance.

They ate it and the family had high praise for Brad. He has one portion for the teacher and that's that. I kind of doubt this teacher will make an issue of it. My perspective is that they've missed so much school (and may still be missing school) that she won't have the time to devote to the unit end celebration.

EllenS

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Re: Cooking project and school cancellation
« Reply #32 on: February 22, 2015, 04:51:00 PM »
I forgot to add that Brad also said to his mother that if the teacher requires them to do it again he will pay for the ingredients from his allowance.

They ate it and the family had high praise for Brad. He has one portion for the teacher and that's that. I kind of doubt this teacher will make an issue of it. My perspective is that they've missed so much school (and may still be missing school) that she won't have the time to devote to the unit end celebration.

Indeed. If we missed a lot of school and the teacher sacrificed catching up core curriculum for a cooking project, I would have something to say about it.
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Alicia

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Re: Cooking project and school cancellation
« Reply #33 on: February 22, 2015, 06:56:27 PM »
Mole sauce at least the recipe i use doesn't freeze well.

HoneyBee42

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Re: Cooking project and school cancellation
« Reply #34 on: February 23, 2015, 01:01:00 AM »
If it were me in this situation, I would take some very nice food photos, enjoy it as a family and help the child write a review on the food. If the teacher insisted my child do it again, I would decline. My child had done the project and shouldn't be penalized for a freak snow storm and extreme cold weather. Nor would I go to the expense *again* to repeat and already completed project.

I agree.

I'm pretty anti-homework anyway (except for reading, spelling and timetables), so there's no way my child would be doing a particular homework assignment twice, especially for reasons that were beyond their control.

OP, how old are these children? Unless they're in high school I can't see many younger children even being able to cook a meal/dish totally on their own, meaning the teacher has also assigned the parents homework in a way (which is extremely inappropriate).  Is each dish supposed to be big enough for each class member to have a sample? That'd be one pretty big investment in ingredients for each family. Any time my kids (or myself as a student) had to provide food for an assignment it was cooked in class, not made a burden for people to do at home and then have to transport in to school etc.

If we did homework and projects the way the school says we're "supposed" to, then all my kids' homework would be a project for me. (I refuse except in limited instances.)
School has changed a lot since I was a kid.

The first term I taught 11 year olds at a new school, we had to do a unit of work on inventions. So the teachers of the other 4 classes of the same grade decided that the kids should invent something. That was pretty much the scope of the assignment. Go home and invent something.

I felt completely awful about sending this ridiculous assignment home. How many 11 year-olds are going to be able to complete that assignment with zero, or even minimal, input from their parents?

The next year, I was much more secure in my position at the school, and argued vigorously for a different assignment, but I couldn't believe how many of the other teachers thought this was completely reasonable.

OP, I'd definitely take photos, or maybe even video of the food being served, and take that.

On the invention thing--I just had to share--we were going through sorting things and I came across an assignment completed by youngest son when he was in 5th grade (he's now in 8th) in which he was supposed to come up with the idea for an invention and write up an ad copy for it.  Oh, my goodness, it is a hoot, and I just have to share (he got a 100 on this):

Quote
Does your dog hate taking a bath?  Does your bathroom look like you wrestled your dog ... and lost?  Do you end up wetter than your dog?  You're in luck!  The Doggie Wash is here.  Now you will be able to clean your dog without getting wet and without wrestling.

Attach the gentle leader and gently get the dog into the Doggie Wash.  Lock the Doggie Wash door and press start.

Shampooed roller brushes will come from all sides of the box and wash your dog completely.  When the Doggie Wash is done with the shampoo, jets of water will come into the Doggie Wash to rinse your dog clean.  Fresh towel rollers, steamed for doggie comfort, will then dry your dog so there will be no mess.  At the end, the Doggie Wash dispenses a treat for your dog.  Then, just unlock the door and release the dog from Doggie Wash, fresh and clean--guaranteed!

For the price of four easy payments of $19.95 plus shipping and handling of $7.95 the Doggie Wash can be yours.

Not for use with human children or cats.  The Doggie Wash comes in four sizes, from chihuahua to Great Dane.

Call now, 1-800-DOG-WASH.  That's 1-800-364-6274 (not a real phone number).

He also has a picture drawn on the back, which I can't replicate.  (Our dog, a German Shepherd/lab mix, *hates* baths.  It takes two people and leaves the bathroom with water and fur in places that you would never suspect.)

For the food assignment--my children have had a few such assignments, and I'd go with the pictures option, unless it was an item very suited to freezing (and if it was an ethnic food that I'm not familiar with, I might not really be able to gauge that and would opt for "not freezable" more likely than not).


Slartibartfast

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Re: Cooking project and school cancellation
« Reply #35 on: February 23, 2015, 01:31:12 AM »
HoneyBee, I think we have one of those here.  At least, there's a car wash which also advertises a "dog wash" and I've always been too scared to actually go in and see what the setup is, but that's totally what I picture it as  :P