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  • May 30, 2016, 12:17:36 AM

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Author Topic: Texting and Messaging - do you assume the device is communal  (Read 3189 times)

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Goosey

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Re: Texting and Messaging - do you assume the device is communal
« Reply #45 on: May 24, 2016, 07:57:40 AM »

I was using my husband's iPad recently to check mail while on vacation, and I was a bit surprised at just how single user tablets are.  Not just that the default is to show sender/subject/first line of emails on the *locked* screen, but also that you can't have more than one account (even a guest/child account without admin privileges), and that Apple makes it officially impossible to check Mac Mail by borrowing someone else's iPad.

If you're the only one using it it's no problem, but given the number of people I know who hand their phone or tablet over to their kid, I now know not to email or text anything I don't want their kids knowing.

It's interesting (and rather sad) to see the change in views of private over public correspondence over the past 30 years. I think it's always been true that there are things you don't leave a paper trail for - things that absolutely must be kept secret and/or deniable. But there are a lot of things that are personal or private, that you don't want random strangers or your friend's kid to know about, but that are perfectly reasonable and normal things to discuss with someone who is close to you. In the past, you could write a letter to a friend or family member about a personal issue with a strong expectation that it would be read by its intended recipient only, and not end up on the equivalent of the front page of a newspaper. Now, written communication is infinitely easier, but there's also a strong incentive to keep it entirely superficial.

I don't even know that this is true, though. People used to read out letters to each other or let other people read letters all the time. I don't think there was ever really an expectation of absolutely privacy, especially among relatives and spouses.

MariaE

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Re: Texting and Messaging - do you assume the device is communal
« Reply #46 on: May 24, 2016, 08:29:01 AM »
If the tablet is unlocked and in use and you don't have every one of those things password protected, it will show, even when the message comes in.

Not if you've set it up not to do so. I've set it up so email retrieval is pull rather than push, so unless I actually open the app, no messages are shown anywhere. I also disable notifications for facebook messages, text messages etc. whenever I let somebody else borrow my iPad for longer periods of time.
 
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blarg314

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Re: Texting and Messaging - do you assume the device is communal
« Reply #47 on: May 24, 2016, 09:40:39 PM »


I don't even know that this is true, though. People used to read out letters to each other or let other people read letters all the time. I don't think there was ever really an expectation of absolutely privacy, especially among relatives and spouses.

Not absolute privacy, but a much higher barrier to exposure, due to the fact that text and email are more easily duplicated than letters. If you want to share a letter, you have to read it out loud to someone, or physically give the letter to them, which takes effort and access. An email can be duplicated with a single mouse click, and sent to as many people as you want, or posted on Facebook. And it's way more easy to accidentally see something on someone's iPad or a shared computer screen than to accidentally open and read someone's mail. Plus, I don't think I've ever met someone who hands over their mail for the kids to play with, while every parent I know passes their kids their iPad or phone to play with.




Allyson

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Re: Texting and Messaging - do you assume the device is communal
« Reply #48 on: May 25, 2016, 09:58:54 PM »
And in some ways, today's society is way more private than in the past, when a lot of people lived all in one room. ;) I don't know that it's really good or bad to have different privacy expectations, just different and we're still adjusting.