Author Topic: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange  (Read 251221 times)

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kareng57

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #105 on: November 18, 2010, 09:19:26 PM »
Australian here...

To any Americans coming to holiday in Australia - please, please remember that the words ''fanny" and ''root" have completely different meanings here.

We use ''backside" (among many others) as a euphamism for the buttocks.  ''Fanny" is a fairly vulger term for a very specifically female part of the anatomy.

We ''barrack" or ''go" for a sports team.  ''Root" is a vulgar term for Scrabble.  Few things will make an Australian squirm more than to hear how a pretty young girl roots for a particular team.

Heh, my aunt and uncle live in NZ, but grew up as Americans.  They got a new neighbor a few years ago, also a recently-ex-American.  He introduced himself as "Hi, I'm Randy!"  My aunt and uncle suggested he might want to go by Randall while he's in NZ  :P  Would that be an issue in Australia too?


DS once had a teacher who had immigrated from Great Britain as a teenager with her family.  As they were driving from the airport, they passed a Burger King, and her Dad told everyone that Whopper had a different meaning here. :)

Luci45

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #106 on: November 18, 2010, 09:21:24 PM »
Australian here...

To any Americans coming to holiday in Australia - please, please remember that the words ''fanny" and ''root" have completely different meanings here.

We use ''backside" (among many others) as a euphamism for the buttocks.  ''Fanny" is a fairly vulger term for a very specifically female part of the anatomy.

We ''barrack" or ''go" for a sports team.  ''Root" is a vulgar term for Scrabble.  Few things will make an Australian squirm more than to hear how a pretty young girl roots for a particular team.

Heh, my aunt and uncle live in NZ, but grew up as Americans.  They got a new neighbor a few years ago, also a recently-ex-American.  He introduced himself as "Hi, I'm Randy!"  My aunt and uncle suggested he might want to go by Randall while he's in NZ  :P  Would that be an issue in Australia too?

Yes, but only for people with a 12-year-old's sense of humour *like me, snicker*  I grew up with one of my mum and dad's friends being called Randy (that was his full name, not short for Randall) and it never occurred to me until much, much later.

Central US: We use Randy for 'wanting scrabble',too. DH and I were going through all those words just recently: John, Richard's nickname, Fanny, Lou (we think it sounds too much like loo), Peter, and a couple more I can't think of right now. Gee, this could be a topic in itself! Sorry.

GeauxTigers

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #107 on: November 18, 2010, 09:34:57 PM »
American bisuits are usually less dense than scones, and are not usually flavored (exception being the nummy cheesy garlicky ones at Red Lobster...)

Oh! Want to get a hint of how yummy clotted cream is? Try some marscapone cheese on a scone, and you're getting close. Clotted cream is softer and has a (for lack of a better word) lumpier consistency.

British rice pudding - the type you get in cans - was a secret vice of mine until I went low-carb. American rice pudding is denser, usually baked, and has things like raisins in it.

PIES!!! American apple pies and apple desserts in general tend to be spiced with cinnamon. In the UK you'll see a lot less cinnamon and a LOT of cloves. (Yum!) My favorite pie was blackberry and apple, made with blackberries picked from the woods behind Gran's house. Pies are also frequently served with yummy hot custard as opposed to ice cream or other toppings.

Pecans grow in the U.S. but not Britain - I had never heard of them or a "pecan pie" until I came over here. It's a pastry shell with a sweet, light brown (not custard) filling, covered with chopped pecans.

British bread is less sweet than American bread and has a firmer texture than can actually withstand being spread with butter and other things.

A British gallon is 20 fluid ounces as opposed to 16 in a U.S. gallon.



Here's my question because I just cannot remember: in a British car with a manual transmission, what is the order of pedals, from left to right? In the U.S. it's clutch-brake-accelerator. My S.O. eems to think that it would need to be reversed in a right-hand drive car, and he hasn't seen anything on Top Gear so far to persuade him otherwise

TeamBhakta

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #108 on: November 18, 2010, 09:47:14 PM »
Also most Americans probably wouldn't think to put mayo on top of a green salad.

My cousin J., who is 70+, eats mayo on her salads. I just assumed she learned that from growing up in rural Virginia.

North American marshmellows are soft, white things, about the size of a golf ball, and are just sugar and geletin, mostly.  There is usually no flavouring to them.  I understand that British marshmellows tend to be of a harder consistancy and are shaped and flavoured?

Out here in Florida, you can get strawberry or chocolate marshmallows year round. Mint, gingerbread or orange flavored marshmallows show up in the stores during the holidays.

8 fluid oz = 1 cup
16 solid oz = 1 pound

I think holiday traditions in other countries are interesting.  I read once about Saint Lucia's Day in Sweden, and thought it was fabulous, but my parents thought it unwise to let me put candles on my head.  In retrospect, a good idea!

I have to ask: were you reading the American Girl books ? Because most of the time I wanted to make the food in those books ;D

Marcel, I get the impression that the Mrs. John Smith thing was carried over from England way back when, but I have no idea if it's still common.

I've seen it a few times on TLC wedding shows, when a couple goes to their reception and the DJ says "Introducing Mr and Mrs Mark Jones!" Also, some of my pre-1970 cookbooks have the recipes listed as

Rainy Day Brownies
Mrs John Smith
Smallville


''Fanny" is a fairly vulger term for a very specifically female part of the anatomy.

Something I've wondered for a while: does Fran Drescher's show The Nanny air overseas ? And if so, do the tv stations leave in the opening line about "where was she to go, she was out on her fanny" ?
« Last Edit: November 18, 2010, 09:48:56 PM by TeamBhakta »

Luci45

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #109 on: November 18, 2010, 09:55:32 PM »

A British gallon is 20 fluid ounces as opposed to 16 in a U.S. gallon.

A US pint is 16 oz. The gallon is 4 quarts = 8 pints = 128 oz.




GoldenGemini

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #110 on: November 18, 2010, 09:57:16 PM »

Here's my question because I just cannot remember: in a British car with a manual transmission, what is the order of pedals, from left to right? In the U.S. it's clutch-brake-accelerator. My S.O. eems to think that it would need to be reversed in a right-hand drive car, and he hasn't seen anything on Top Gear so far to persuade him otherwise

Sorry, your SO is wrong.  Left to right - clutch, brake, accelerator.

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GeauxTigers

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #111 on: November 18, 2010, 10:03:00 PM »
Lucinda7, you're absolutely right. It's been a loooong day (followed by a glass of lovely wine...)

Luci45

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #112 on: November 18, 2010, 10:20:16 PM »
Lucinda7, you're absolutely right. It's been a loooong day (followed by a glass of lovely wine...)

Oops! I'm thinking about a midpriced reisling right now. I should have been more polite about it - I'm tired too!

marcel

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #113 on: November 18, 2010, 10:35:24 PM »
One thing that puzzles me about Britain - why do they usually have one tap for hot, one for cold? In NA, we join the two streams into one tap, so you can adjust the temperature until it's just right, not frantically flail your hands under the twin taps going "Too hot! Too cold! Too hot! Too cold!...."

I always figured that was an age of building thing.  Most of the modern buildings I was in (or buildings with modern bathrooms) in the UK had a single tap, and I've been in older buildings in the US that had separate taps. 
It is more a UK thing then an age of building thing though.
In countries just across the North sea, with buildings of an equal age, you will not see this.
I am from '74 and I had hardly ever seen any of them before my first visit to the UK.
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Ms_Shell

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #114 on: November 18, 2010, 10:42:44 PM »
American here.  I have a bunch of questions for the Brits and Aussies - sorry if it gets a little overwhelming!

What on earth is treacle?  Is it edible?  What about Spotted D.ick? (yes, that makes me giggle... ;D)

In British/Australian literature, public schools seem to be pretty exclusive and hard to get into.  This confuses me because in the US, public schools are funded by the government and anyone can attend, no entrance exam required (hence the name public).  How is the educational system set up there? 

Oh, and I'm totally addicted to the Shopaholic series of books, and if I ever get over to London, I'm definitely going shopping.  Is Topshop as awesome as it sounds?  :)
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EngineerChick

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #115 on: November 18, 2010, 10:48:42 PM »
What are cream cakes?  Are they normal cakes with a cream filling, or is there something different in how they are made?

Since terminology is part of the discussion, "shag" is not only a type of rug and a term used by Austin Powers, but is a swing dancing variant that I first heard of as being popular in the Carolinas during the 1950s and 1960s.  I learned how to dance the shag at my cousin's 16th birthday party, but I don't remember how to do it now.  

There is also the term "shagging balls", which refers to the retrieval of baseballs during batting practice, and I have heard used for other sports as well.

Metric/English--in most common usage, I use the English units of measure, but when it comes to engineering or medicine, I have heard and used the metric terms as often, if not more.  The oddity comes in aviation, where there is temperature in degrees Celsius, barometric pressure in inches of mercury, velocity in knots (nautical miles per hour), and distance in either statute or nautical miles, depending on what you are referring to.  Then there is fuel, which can be measured in gallons, pounds, or hours on the same aircraft.
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TeamBhakta

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #116 on: November 18, 2010, 10:49:40 PM »
American here.  I have a bunch of questions for the Brits and Aussies - sorry if it gets a little overwhelming!

What on earth is treacle?  Is it edible?  What about Spotted D.ick? (yes, that makes me giggle... ;D)

In British/Australian literature, public schools seem to be pretty exclusive and hard to get into.  This confuses me because in the US, public schools are funded by the government and anyone can attend, no entrance exam required (hence the name public).  How is the educational system set up there?  

Oh, and I'm totally addicted to the Shopaholic series of books, and if I ever get over to London, I'm definitely going shopping.  Is Topshop as awesome as it sounds?  :)

I was under the impression Topshop was overpriced and not that great. At least what that's I understood from snarky jokes on my Britcoms
« Last Edit: November 18, 2010, 10:51:12 PM by TeamBhakta »

kareng57

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #117 on: November 18, 2010, 10:55:33 PM »
One thing that puzzles me about Britain - why do they usually have one tap for hot, one for cold? In NA, we join the two streams into one tap, so you can adjust the temperature until it's just right, not frantically flail your hands under the twin taps going "Too hot! Too cold! Too hot! Too cold!...."

I always figured that was an age of building thing.  Most of the modern buildings I was in (or buildings with modern bathrooms) in the UK had a single tap, and I've been in older buildings in the US that had separate taps. 
It is more a UK thing then an age of building thing though.
In countries just across the North sea, with buildings of an equal age, you will not see this.
I am from '74 and I had hardly ever seen any of them before my first visit to the UK.


In Canada one does occasionally see the two-taps in older private buildings, as well.  I remember a quirky older hotel in Lake Louise where this was the case, and in fact in our room the faucets were labelled the wrong way around - but they did warn us. :)

hellgirl

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #118 on: November 18, 2010, 11:01:23 PM »
I have one (so far):

If Guy Fawkes tried to do a terrible thing-blow up Parliament-then why do you celebrate his day with fireworks and having fun?  Or is it celebrating that he failed?


We celebrate that he failed. Frankly though, they were not too bright.  A group of them came in out of the rain, and noticed that the gunpowder was wet, so they put it in front of the room fire to dry out ...... KABOOM!!!

The poem goes, "Remember, remember the 5th of November, Gunpowder, treason and plot".

King James ordered celebrations when the conspirators were caught and for bonfires to be lit over the country.  Effiegies of Guy Fawkes were burned on the fire.  In days gone by (until about the 1970's I think(, children used to raise money for their fireworks and sweets by making a "Guy" out of sacks etc, and then having him on the street and asking passers by "penny for the Guy?"

Guy fawkes was tortured and hung, drawn and quartered I believe.  But we all have candy floss and sparklers now, so hey ho!

To be fair I haven't read the thread to know if this has been addressed - but I always thought the celebration was not that he failed, but that someone would try such a thing - kind of 'if we don't like something we do something about it'.
But then again I don't remember learning a lot about Guy Fawkes, even though we celebrate it in NZ.

Linley

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #119 on: November 18, 2010, 11:02:58 PM »
Is Topshop as awesome as it sounds?  :)

There's a Topshop in NYC now. I've only been once but they had some pretty cool things.


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