Author Topic: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange  (Read 272428 times)

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squashedfrog

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #135 on: November 19, 2010, 04:45:55 AM »
Question for British EHellions: Just what is chicken tikka masala?

Practically our national dish. ;D

[/lives in the current official Curry Capital of Britain]

So I hear! But is it more tomatoey or creamy?

Anyone??
One explanation of the origins of the dish is that it was conceived in either a British Pakistani or a British Bangladeshi restaurant. There are claims that an Indian chef in Glasgow invented it by improvising a sauce made from yogurt, cream and spices. Though some say this was in London.  As a tikka dish is usually dry, supposedly, the customers were asking for something “with a sauce or a gravy”, so it was invented to suit the British pallet.
Chicken tikka masala is chicken tikka, or chunks of chicken, marinated in spices and yogurt then baked in a tandoor oven, served in a masala ("mixture of spices") sauce.
There is no standard recipe for chicken tikka masala; a survey found that of 48 different recipes, the only common ingredient was chicken. The sauce usually includes tomatoes, frequently as puree; cream and/or coconut cream; and various spices. The sauce or chicken pieces (or both) are coloured orange with food dyes or with orange foodstuffs such as turmeric powder, paprika powder or tomato puree.[7] Other tikka masala dishes replace chicken with lamb, fish or paneer.

Wow.  Im hungry now.

M-theory

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #136 on: November 19, 2010, 04:47:24 AM »
Question for British EHellions: Just what is chicken tikka masala?

Practically our national dish. ;D

[/lives in the current official Curry Capital of Britain]

So I hear! But is it more tomatoey or creamy?

Anyone??

google is your friend.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicken_tikka_masala

"The sauce is usually creamy, lightly spiced and contains tomatoes."

So... both?  ;D (I suspect "creamy" is more dominant than tomatoey, or it has been in the South African variants I've tasted).


Sorry, I should have quoted my original post on the topic. I've eaten chicken tikka masala before, dozens of times: my problem is that it's one thing (creamy and slightly tomatoey) in the U.S. and another thing (tomatoey with no creaminess) in Canada. I was curious what it is in the UK. Also, Wikipedia isn't a trustworthy source - I had to edit vandalism out of the entry for The Handmaid's Tale a couple of days ago.

M-theory

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #137 on: November 19, 2010, 04:49:09 AM »
There is no standard recipe for chicken tikka masala; a survey found that of 48 different recipes, the only common ingredient was chicken. The sauce usually includes tomatoes, frequently as puree; cream and/or coconut cream; and various spices. The sauce or chicken pieces (or both) are coloured orange with food dyes or with orange foodstuffs such as turmeric powder, paprika powder or tomato puree.[7] Other tikka masala dishes replace chicken with lamb, fish or paneer.

Wow.  Im hungry now.


Which begs the question as to why butter chicken/chicken makhani even exists, since it's indistinguishable from the creamy variant on chicken tikka masala. Oh well!

squashedfrog

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #138 on: November 19, 2010, 04:50:18 AM »
Question for British EHellions: Just what is chicken tikka masala?

Practically our national dish. ;D

[/lives in the current official Curry Capital of Britain]

hey, are we talking the same capital here?   Im just outside Brum. :)

squashedfrog

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #139 on: November 19, 2010, 04:51:33 AM »
does any other country have something similar to Yorkshire puddings with a roast dinner?

M-theory

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #140 on: November 19, 2010, 04:53:03 AM »
does any other country have something similar to Yorkshire puddings with a roast dinner?

A chain restaurant in Canada (which occasionally appears in the U.S.) serves Yorkshire pudding with their prime rib. It's very bland, though.

MrsO

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #141 on: November 19, 2010, 04:54:05 AM »
does any other country have something similar to Yorkshire puddings with a roast dinner?
I don't know, but in a similar vein...
I once posted in the 'Whats for dinner?' thread that I was having Toad in the Hole. It emerged that in America, Toad in the Hole is (if I remember correctly) Fried egg in the middle of toast with a hole in, or something similar. If I was expecting toad in the hole for dinner, and was served egg on toast, I would cry. :P :D

squashedfrog

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #142 on: November 19, 2010, 04:59:09 AM »
Question for British EHellions: Just what is chicken tikka masala?

Practically our national dish. ;D

[/lives in the current official Curry Capital of Britain]

So I hear! But is it more tomatoey or creamy?

Anyone??

google is your friend.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicken_tikka_masala

"The sauce is usually creamy, lightly spiced and contains tomatoes."

So... both?  ;D (I suspect "creamy" is more dominant than tomatoey, or it has been in the South African variants I've tasted).


Sorry, I should have quoted my original post on the topic. I've eaten chicken tikka masala before, dozens of times: my problem is that it's one thing (creamy and slightly tomatoey) in the U.S. and another thing (tomatoey with no creaminess) in Canada. I was curious what it is in the UK. Also, Wikipedia isn't a trustworthy source - I had to edit vandalism out of the entry for The Handmaid's Tale a couple of days ago.

Yeah I find that wiki, I just grabbed the bits that in my experience do some it up.  I would say its creamy more often than not, but then I had one in London, and it wasn’t as creamy, it was heavily spiced.  Some put cream in it, some put yoghurt, some put coconut cream in it.  Depends on the restaurant.


Kess

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #143 on: November 19, 2010, 05:02:17 AM »
Sorry, I should have quoted my original post on the topic. I've eaten chicken tikka masala before, dozens of times: my problem is that it's one thing (creamy and slightly tomatoey) in the U.S. and another thing (tomatoey with no creaminess) in Canada. I was curious what it is in the UK. Also, Wikipedia isn't a trustworthy source - I had to edit vandalism out of the entry for The Handmaid's Tale a couple of days ago.

Generally chicken tikka masala is a bit more tomatoey, whereas chicken korma is much creamier (made with cream and coconut milk).

M-theory

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #144 on: November 19, 2010, 05:04:14 AM »
Sorry, I should have quoted my original post on the topic. I've eaten chicken tikka masala before, dozens of times: my problem is that it's one thing (creamy and slightly tomatoey) in the U.S. and another thing (tomatoey with no creaminess) in Canada. I was curious what it is in the UK. Also, Wikipedia isn't a trustworthy source - I had to edit vandalism out of the entry for The Handmaid's Tale a couple of days ago.

Generally chicken tikka masala is a bit more tomatoey, whereas chicken korma is much creamier (made with cream and coconut milk).

Hmm, in my experience on both sides of the 49th parallel, korma is defined by containing ground nuts in a creamy sauce. I think I need to go to the UK and eat a lot of Indian food. For scientific purposes. >:D

Kess

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #145 on: November 19, 2010, 05:05:08 AM »
Australian here...

To any Americans coming to holiday in Australia - please, please remember that the words ''fanny" and ''root" have completely different meanings here.

We use ''backside" (among many others) as a euphamism for the buttocks.  ''Fanny" is a fairly vulger term for a very specifically female part of the anatomy.

We ''barrack" or ''go" for a sports team.  ''Root" is a vulgar term for Scrabble.  Few things will make an Australian squirm more than to hear how a pretty young girl roots for a particular team.

"Fanny" is also very rude in the UK (and probably refers to the same part of female anatomy).  People tend to be momentarily stunned and then suppress a snigger when confronted by an American talking about his/her "fanny pack" - I think that's what we'd call a "bum bag" but the American term is so RUDE! lol

Kess

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #146 on: November 19, 2010, 05:06:41 AM »
Hmm, in my experience on both sides of the 49th parallel, korma is defined by containing ground nuts in a creamy sauce. I think I need to go to the UK and eat a lot of Indian food. For scientific purposes. >:D

"Ground nuts" are peanuts, yes?  Then no, korma isn't peanut-y at all here - that would be satay I reckon.

MrsO

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #147 on: November 19, 2010, 05:15:28 AM »
Hmm, in my experience on both sides of the 49th parallel, korma is defined by containing ground nuts in a creamy sauce. I think I need to go to the UK and eat a lot of Indian food. For scientific purposes. >:D

"Ground nuts" are peanuts, yes?  Then no, korma isn't peanut-y at all here - that would be satay I reckon.
Korma is almondy. And delicious. :)

Kess

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #148 on: November 19, 2010, 05:17:21 AM »
American here.  I have a bunch of questions for the Brits and Aussies - sorry if it gets a little overwhelming!

What on earth is treacle?  Is it edible?  What about Spotted D.ick? (yes, that makes me giggle... ;D)

In British/Australian literature, public schools seem to be pretty exclusive and hard to get into.  This confuses me because in the US, public schools are funded by the government and anyone can attend, no entrance exam required (hence the name public).  How is the educational system set up there? 

Oh, and I'm totally addicted to the Shopaholic series of books, and if I ever get over to London, I'm definitely going shopping.  Is Topshop as awesome as it sounds?  :)

Treacle is lovely sticky toffee-related stuff.  Spotted d1ck is a sponge pudding with dried fruit (raisins and currants I think) in it.

British education system at a glance:
State Schools - completely state funded, free to attend, and you generally go to the one nearest your house, though if you are in the "catchement area" of more than one you may get a choice, or if a sibling goes to the school or whatever.  Generally high quality, but, typically, we complain about them anyway :).  A lot of religious schools come under the state umbrella too - they're funded slightly differently but still free to attend.
Private Schools - Parents pay fees and there's normally some sort of selection process of interviews, entrance exams, etc.  There used to be Government Assisted Places where bright kids' school fees were paid by the government so they could attend private schools.  Private schools are often, but not always by any means, nominally Christian.
Public Schools - are the top private schools.  Eton, Harrow, etc.  Places aristocracy send their children to be educated.  Mostly boarding schools, and the contacts the kids make here will set them up for life.  Fees are more than most people's entire yearly income, and there are lots of traditions to be adhered to, and generally a specific tie to be worn for life to everyone in the know recognises you as an "Etonian" or whatever.
Home education - is legal in the UK (though not in some European countries like Germany, I don't think) and growing, though there have been some government attacks on it under the last government.

MrsO

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #149 on: November 19, 2010, 05:19:21 AM »
Oh and Topshop: Overpriced and a bit crap (IMO) ;D