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Author Topic: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange  (Read 664867 times)

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toontownnutter

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3900 on: July 01, 2011, 06:37:32 AM »
Lower speed limit applies 24/7 even without presence of workmen. Police used to sit with the radar in one set of roadworks which took over a year to complete on a Sunday afternoon.

katycoo

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3901 on: July 01, 2011, 07:22:54 AM »
Okay, on the "Escalating" thread, someone mentioned that strollers are allowed on escalators in Paris.  Is this accurate? 

Here in the States, sure strollers are allowed, but without a kid in it!  You need to take the child out for safety's sake!

How is this situation handled elsewhere?

I'm unaware of any restrictions about who/what can go on an escalator in Australia.  I'm guessing they expect us to use common sense.


Re the construction speed limit. You're supposed to do the posted limit regardless of whether workers are present or not.   I choose to go with the traffic.

Bethalize

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3902 on: July 01, 2011, 07:40:13 AM »
Bethalize, I guess I wasn't fully alert when I posted that.  I was wondering how popular it was.  It never would have occurred to me to ask except for this:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/videos/chopped-all-stars-ep.-2-recap/71395.html

The video isn't showing for me. Put it this way: it's like any traditional food. If your parents served it, it's your comfort food. I don't know anyone who has it as a regular part of their menu plan although I have met the occasional Scottish person who does. You can buy it in UK supermarkets so there must be a good sprinkling of people who eat it. I don't think you need to can it particularly though as it's fairly portable once wrapped.

Snooks

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3903 on: July 01, 2011, 09:17:06 AM »
Bethalize, I guess I wasn't fully alert when I posted that.  I was wondering how popular it was.  It never would have occurred to me to ask except for this:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/videos/chopped-all-stars-ep.-2-recap/71395.html

The video isn't showing for me. Put it this way: it's like any traditional food. If your parents served it, it's your comfort food. I don't know anyone who has it as a regular part of their menu plan although I have met the occasional Scottish person who does. You can buy it in UK supermarkets so there must be a good sprinkling of people who eat it. I don't think you need to can it particularly though as it's fairly portable once wrapped.

I eat haggis fairly regularly and I live in the East of England.  Never have a problem finding it.

marcel

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3904 on: July 01, 2011, 10:02:54 AM »
Posted speed limits at road work in The Netherlands:
You always have to follow them, since letting people determine for themselves whether or not there are workers present is simply too dangerous.
On practically all freeways here we have matrix signs anyway, so there speed limits can easily be put up and taken off again.


re escalator:
That is your own responsibility here, for as far as I know.
The escalator I am monitoring right now, I don't care who or what gets on it, as long as they don't hit the emergency stop without reason, and don't stand still within the area of stagnancy detection (I realise people are not aware of the latter) As an aside, this escalator is actually mostly used by cyclists.
Wherever you go..... There you are.

Louie_LI

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3905 on: July 01, 2011, 12:34:47 PM »
Okay, on the "Escalating" thread, someone mentioned that strollers are allowed on escalators in Paris.  Is this accurate? 

Here in the States, sure strollers are allowed, but without a kid in it!  You need to take the child out for safety's sake!

How is this situation handled elsewhere?

Do you doubt my veracity? ;)

I see people taking strollers (with child inside) on the escalators in the Metro everyday. There are no signs forbidding it. It seems safer to me than when I see a rather petite woman pick up the stroller (still with child inside) and start to carry it down a steep flight of stairs crowded with other people. There are very few elevators in the metro.

Larrabee

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3906 on: July 01, 2011, 12:42:28 PM »
Okay, on the "Escalating" thread, someone mentioned that strollers are allowed on escalators in Paris.  Is this accurate? 

Here in the States, sure strollers are allowed, but without a kid in it!  You need to take the child out for safety's sake!

How is this situation handled elsewhere?

Do you doubt my veracity? ;)

I see people taking strollers (with child inside) on the escalators in the Metro everyday. There are no signs forbidding it. It seems safer to me than when I see a rather petite woman pick up the stroller (still with child inside) and start to carry it down a steep flight of stairs crowded with other people. There are very few elevators in the metro.

I think buggies (strollers) on continental Europe tend to be be more lightweight and compact than the behemoths that are common in the US and to a lesser extent the UK!

The tube in London also has very few lifts (elevators), the maps have symbols telling you which stations do.  Its not ideal for disabled people but its very hard to put them retroactively into a hundred plus year old system of tunnels under a major city!  Luckily you can get everywhere on the disabled accessible buses, it just takes more time.

Weez

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3907 on: July 02, 2011, 04:17:01 PM »

Question for Brits:  Haggis in a can?

No, just no!

It exists, but I wouldn't recommend it.  From what I've seen, it tends to be marketed to tourists (along with the musical Nessie toys), so really just novelty value.  For the good stuff, you need a decent butcher.

sweetgirl

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3908 on: July 03, 2011, 08:05:30 AM »
I just cut up a pumpkin for some scones and pumpkin pie tmw and all I can say is....Y'all are nuts making jack'0'lanterns at halloween. Took me 2 hrs to cut the dingdangity thing. How do you cut the faces into it?

camlan

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3909 on: July 03, 2011, 08:09:26 AM »
In the past week, I've read two novels by British authors which had characters named "Gotobed."

How do you pronounce this name? Go-to-bed? Got-o-bed? Or some other way?

Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


iridaceae

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3910 on: July 03, 2011, 08:12:00 AM »
I read a book that had a character named Gotobed in it and the main character was told it's Got-o-bed and that it was (if I remember correctly) Danish.
Nothing to see here.

camlan

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3911 on: July 03, 2011, 08:20:24 AM »
I just cut up a pumpkin for some scones and pumpkin pie tmw and all I can say is....Y'all are nuts making jack'0'lanterns at halloween. Took me 2 hrs to cut the dingdangity thing. How do you cut the faces into it?

It takes a sharp knife. First you cut off the top and scoop out all the seeds inside. Then you go to work cutting out the eyes and mouth. But it's more a sawing motion than a chopping motion. And the riper the pumpkin is, the softer it is.

Not having to peel it saves a lot of time, too.

When I make pumpkin bread or muffins, I just buy a can of pumpkin, as they aren't readily available in supermarkets most of the year.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


Nibsey

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3912 on: July 03, 2011, 08:29:36 AM »
I just cut up a pumpkin for some scones and pumpkin pie tmw and all I can say is....Y'all are nuts making jack'0'lanterns at halloween. Took me 2 hrs to cut the dingdangity thing. How do you cut the faces into it?

It takes a sharp knife. First you cut off the top and scoop out all the seeds inside. Then you go to work cutting out the eyes and mouth. But it's more a sawing motion than a chopping motion. And the riper the pumpkin is, the softer it is.

Not having to peel it saves a lot of time, too.

When I make pumpkin bread or muffins, I just buy a can of pumpkin, as they aren't readily available in supermarkets most of the year.

Yep that's how I do it too. And it's a hell of alot easier than trying to crave a turnip. One year my Grandad insisted we make a jack o lantern the traditional way he did as a child when you couldn't really get pumpkin over here...lets just say I wouldn't eat turnip for years after that.  :P
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zoidberg

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3913 on: July 03, 2011, 09:22:54 AM »
Okay, on the "Escalating" thread, someone mentioned that strollers are allowed on escalators in Paris.  Is this accurate? 

Here in the States, sure strollers are allowed, but without a kid in it!  You need to take the child out for safety's sake!

How is this situation handled elsewhere?

Do you doubt my veracity? ;)

I see people taking strollers (with child inside) on the escalators in the Metro everyday. There are no signs forbidding it. It seems safer to me than when I see a rather petite woman pick up the stroller (still with child inside) and start to carry it down a steep flight of stairs crowded with other people. There are very few elevators in the metro.

Same here in Germany. I've taken DD up and down escalators in the buggy when she's strapped in. I don't do it when I have the choice to take the elevator, but I don't always have the option. You just lift the stroller a bit by pushing on the handle, the same you would when lifting it on a curb. It's not perfect, but IMO not any more dangerous than normal elevator use with a child.

cabbageweevil

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3914 on: July 03, 2011, 09:54:39 AM »
I read a book that had a character named Gotobed in it and the main character was told it's Got-o-bed and that it was (if I remember correctly) Danish.
Lifelong Brit (citizen and resident) giving his 2 pence on the matter (iridaceae's post, and camlan's #4004 which prompted it): I've long been aware that Gotobed is a surname found in Britain in real life -- not common, but has existed for centuries. I admit that the current phone directory for the northern part of the large English city where I live, contains no Gotobeds. Whether originally Danish; or what's the correct pronunciation -- I've never heard the name spoken, so cannot usefully inform.

There's an English doggerel poem (from the 19th Century or earlier) of many verses, on the general subject of the paradoxical unsuitability of people's surnames.  A few lines therefrom:

"Mr. Bold is as timid as ever could be,
 Mr. Ranger ne'er goes on a journey;
 Mr. Gotobed gets up at half after three [p.m.],
 Mr. Makepeace was bred an attorney..."


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