Author Topic: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange  (Read 269565 times)

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zoidberg

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3915 on: July 03, 2011, 10:22:54 AM »
Okay, on the "Escalating" thread, someone mentioned that strollers are allowed on escalators in Paris.  Is this accurate? 

Here in the States, sure strollers are allowed, but without a kid in it!  You need to take the child out for safety's sake!

How is this situation handled elsewhere?

Do you doubt my veracity? ;)

I see people taking strollers (with child inside) on the escalators in the Metro everyday. There are no signs forbidding it. It seems safer to me than when I see a rather petite woman pick up the stroller (still with child inside) and start to carry it down a steep flight of stairs crowded with other people. There are very few elevators in the metro.

Same here in Germany. I've taken DD up and down escalators in the buggy when she's strapped in. I don't do it when I have the choice to take the elevator, but I don't always have the option. You just lift the stroller a bit by pushing on the handle, the same you would when lifting it on a curb. It's not perfect, but IMO not any more dangerous than normal elevator use with a child.

cabbageweevil

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3916 on: July 03, 2011, 10:54:39 AM »
I read a book that had a character named Gotobed in it and the main character was told it's Got-o-bed and that it was (if I remember correctly) Danish.
Lifelong Brit (citizen and resident) giving his 2 pence on the matter (iridaceae's post, and camlan's #4004 which prompted it): I've long been aware that Gotobed is a surname found in Britain in real life -- not common, but has existed for centuries. I admit that the current phone directory for the northern part of the large English city where I live, contains no Gotobeds. Whether originally Danish; or what's the correct pronunciation -- I've never heard the name spoken, so cannot usefully inform.

There's an English doggerel poem (from the 19th Century or earlier) of many verses, on the general subject of the paradoxical unsuitability of people's surnames.  A few lines therefrom:

"Mr. Bold is as timid as ever could be,
 Mr. Ranger ne'er goes on a journey;
 Mr. Gotobed gets up at half after three [p.m.],
 Mr. Makepeace was bred an attorney..."

Slartibartfast

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3917 on: July 04, 2011, 06:14:48 PM »
re: monkey postcards again, I made a new post and would love some help birthday-pranking my sister if y'all are willing  ;D 

aiki

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3918 on: July 04, 2011, 09:59:16 PM »
Okay, so you're driving down a road with a fairly high speed limit and you come across a construction zone where the speed limit drops drastically.  Nobody's working, nothing's wrong with the road itself, there are just cones along the shoulder and the speed limit signs are covered over and/or changed.

Does the lower limit apply only when people are working, or all the time?  I never know what to do - I slow down, but then there's nobody there and the rest of the traffic is going the former speed limit anyway, and I figure it's more dangerous to do 40 when everyone else is doing 65 than it is to go normal speed through a clearly empty construction zone.

As a practical matter, I usually slow down until someone passes me and then speed up to follow them - on the theory that if there is a speed trap, they'll be the first through it :P  Anyone know the official rule, though?

All the time, for two reasons. There's a lot of invisible engineering that goes into the process of creating a road which is safe enough for use at high speeds, in the compaction of the base layers for strength, and into the finish of the surface for traction and skid resistance. The lowered speed limit is not just for the safety of the road workers. 
1) For your safety: A partially or newly finished road may not be as safe as a completed road, with loose gravel on the surface that can fly up and break windscreens, or cause drivers to lose traction/skid.
2) To protect the road: A road which has not finished being compacted (and being used by vehicles at a lower speed can be part of the compaction process) may be damaged (think potholes/sinking/cracking) by being used at too high a speed too soon.  Also, if those base layers fail, it can cause safety issues.

   
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mandycorn

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3919 on: July 07, 2011, 12:09:48 PM »
RE: Pumpkin Carving - In the US we grow specific breeds of pumpkins just for carving. They have less edible flesh and more hollow space in the middle and a thinner skin so they're easier to carve. They also tend to grow bigger than eating pumpkins.

I thought of one this morning: How are the pedals arranged in your car?  In my car, the driver's seat is on the left and the pedals go Clutch (if the car has one), Brake, Accelerator. Is the order reversed in cars where the driver sits on the right so the accelerator is always closest to the center or are they just kept in the same order and shifted to the other side of the car?
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P-p-p-penguin

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3920 on: July 07, 2011, 12:12:17 PM »
^ We drive on the left so the driver's seat is on the right.  The left-hand pedal is the clutch, the middle is the brake, and the right-hand pedal is the accelerator.

mandycorn

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3921 on: July 07, 2011, 01:08:50 PM »
Interesting. I kind of thought it would be the opposite of that with the Accelerator always in the most protected spot nearest the middle of the car so it wouldn't get depressed in case of an accident.

Thanks P-p-p-penguin
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Luci

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3922 on: July 07, 2011, 01:16:16 PM »
^ We drive on the left so the driver's seat is on the right.  The left-hand pedal is the clutch, the middle is the brake, and the right-hand pedal is the accelerator.
Interesting. I kind of thought it would be the opposite of that with the Accelerator always in the most protected spot nearest the middle of the car so it wouldn't get depressed in case of an accident.

Thanks P-p-p-penguin

Wow! Never thought of that!

Most people are right footed as well as right handed, so it makes sense.

PS As the daughter, grandmother,  mother in law, aunt of lefties, I know they exist and have to accommodate to the righty world, so don't hit me on that, please.

PaintingPastelPrincess

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3923 on: July 07, 2011, 07:24:40 PM »
I just read in the Baby Names thread that "Aleph" (I think I spelled that right) is used in Israel to signify a person who cannot be named.  In the US, we typically will say things like "the [title; eg. doctor, informant, victim, suspect, etc]" or will use John/Jane Doe for unknown or unnamed people.  I was wondering what other countries had anything like this?

Luci

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3924 on: July 07, 2011, 07:39:28 PM »
I just read in the Baby Names thread that "Aleph" (I think I spelled that right) is used in Israel to signify a person who cannot be named.  In the US, we typically will say things like "the [title; eg. doctor, informant, victim, suspect, etc]" or will use John/Jane Doe for unknown or unnamed people.  I was wondering what other countries had anything like this?

Joe.

Please in the name that all is holy, do not let the baby name thread leak anywhere, no matter what. Thank you very much.

No matter what.....

Betelnut

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3925 on: July 07, 2011, 08:54:49 PM »
I just read in the Baby Names thread that "Aleph" (I think I spelled that right) is used in Israel to signify a person who cannot be named.  In the US, we typically will say things like "the [title; eg. doctor, informant, victim, suspect, etc]" or will use John/Jane Doe for unknown or unnamed people.  I was wondering what other countries had anything like this?

Joe.

Please in the name that all is holy, do not let the baby name thread leak anywhere, no matter what. Thank you very much.

No matter what.....

You should check out the "Culture Shock Thread"--it has turned into this thread.
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Luci

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3926 on: July 07, 2011, 08:57:54 PM »
I just read in the Baby Names thread that "Aleph" (I think I spelled that right) is used in Israel to signify a person who cannot be named.  In the US, we typically will say things like "the [title; eg. doctor, informant, victim, suspect, etc]" or will use John/Jane Doe for unknown or unnamed people.  I was wondering what other countries had anything like this?

Joe.

Please in the name that all is holy, do not let the baby name thread leak anywhere, no matter what. Thank you very much.

No matter what.....

You should check out the "Culture Shock Thread"--it has turned into this thread.

Oh, my Goodness! I am doing so well here!

dawnfire

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3927 on: July 07, 2011, 10:17:56 PM »
I just read in the Baby Names thread that "Aleph" (I think I spelled that right) is used in Israel to signify a person who cannot be named.  In the US, we typically will say things like "the [title; eg. doctor, informant, victim, suspect, etc]" or will use John/Jane Doe for unknown or unnamed people.  I was wondering what other countries had anything like this?

Joe.

Please in the name that all is holy, do not let the baby name thread leak anywhere, no matter what. Thank you very much.

No matter what.....

too late Natalie Portman has just named her son that.

PaintingPastelPrincess

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3928 on: July 07, 2011, 11:50:30 PM »
I just read in the Baby Names thread that "Aleph" (I think I spelled that right) is used in Israel to signify a person who cannot be named.  In the US, we typically will say things like "the [title; eg. doctor, informant, victim, suspect, etc]" or will use John/Jane Doe for unknown or unnamed people.  I was wondering what other countries had anything like this?

Joe.

Please in the name that all is holy, do not let the baby name thread leak anywhere, no matter what. Thank you very much.

No matter what.....

too late Natalie Portman has just named her son that.

I'm not "leaking" the thread anywhere.  I read something elsewhere, applied it to something I know about the US, and thought it was interesting enough to wonder about other countries.  I'm not asking people to invent names for unknown people.

Redsoil

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3929 on: July 10, 2011, 10:16:29 AM »
One thing I've wondered about, is the reference to people in the US living in "trailers"  (sometimes referred to as "single-wide" or "double-wide").  I'm a bit confused as to what sort of living space this provides, as "trailers" here tend to translate as caravans, and whilst you could live in them I shouldn't think it would be very convenient as a long term thing, let alone having a family in one.  They're generally used for holidays.  So, I suspect that "trailers" are something altogether different?

Can anyone enlighten me, possibly with pictures, so I get a better idea of what they're like?  Are they typically one one's own land, or (similar to caravan parks here) on rented land?  Can they be easily moved?
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