Author Topic: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange  (Read 305851 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Outdoor Girl

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 14500
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3930 on: July 10, 2011, 10:21:57 AM »
Caravans would also be called trailers here (I'm Canadian but I think the same applies to the US).  But the trailers that people live in tend to be bigger than a travel trailer, especially the double wides, which are essentially twice the width of a regular trailer.  They are sometimes brought into place in two trailers with one open side which are then fitted together on site.  They tend to be stationary in a park where the land is rented from the owner of the property and do get prettied up outside with decks and flowers and so on.  They are moveable but not easily.

It is a lower cost housing option for a lot of people who can't afford to purchase a regular house.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario

minky

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 190
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3931 on: July 10, 2011, 10:24:48 AM »
One thing I've wondered about, is the reference to people in the US living in "trailers"  (sometimes referred to as "single-wide" or "double-wide").  I'm a bit confused as to what sort of living space this provides, as "trailers" here tend to translate as caravans, and whilst you could live in them I shouldn't think it would be very convenient as a long term thing, let alone having a family in one.  They're generally used for holidays.  So, I suspect that "trailers" are something altogether different?

Can anyone enlighten me, possibly with pictures, so I get a better idea of what they're like?  Are they typically one one's own land, or (similar to caravan parks here) on rented land?  Can they be easily moved?

Google Image the term mobile home.

EngineerChick

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 877
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3932 on: July 10, 2011, 10:58:29 AM »
Wikipedia has some good pictures of mobile homes/trailers in the US. 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile_home

These are different from RVs (Winnebago is a good example) and camping/towing trailers (Airstream would be a good example).
Talk nerdy to me.

Slartibartfast

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 11879
    • Nerdy Necklaces - my Etsy shop!
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3933 on: July 10, 2011, 11:53:29 AM »
The whole "mobile" part is not because they're intended to be moved, it's because as long as they *could* be moved if you really wanted to, the taxes are different.

Dindrane

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 15463
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3934 on: July 10, 2011, 01:48:51 PM »
They're also sometimes called manufactured homes.  The mobile part comes in that they're built at a factory, moved to whatever site they will be ultimately located on, and then (if it's a double or triple wide) put together.

For what a European would call a trailer, we tend to use the term RV (Recreation Vehicle), or perhaps a camper.  Those aren't intended to be long-term homes, either.


katycoo

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3853
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3935 on: July 10, 2011, 08:35:41 PM »
I associate 'caravan' or 'trailor' with a mobile home with wheels, towed behind a car.  The mobile homes which people live is are 'portable' but not on wheels.  more like little demountable homes.
Much cheaper to construct, but can be quite nice when well maintained.

Interesting. I kind of thought it would be the opposite of that with the Accelerator always in the most protected spot nearest the middle of the car so it wouldn't get depressed in case of an accident.

I would think changing from LHD to RHD if the pedals were also reversed would be incrediably dangerous.  Wouldn't take much to slam on the accelerator instead of the brake by force of habit.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2011, 09:19:07 PM by kam0706 »

Redsoil

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2116
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3936 on: July 11, 2011, 09:27:45 AM »
Thanks for the info - I have a much clearer idea now!  I imagine there is quite a lot of variation in the market, going by the pics available online.
Look out... 
It's one of the Aussie Contingent!


Larrabee

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4749
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3937 on: July 12, 2011, 06:25:54 AM »
Here's something I've just noticed in another thread.   

The OP mentioned that they don't have a TV in their bedroom and implied that it was unusual. 

Well, none of the adults I know who have their own homes (rented or owned) have TVs in their bedrooms!  Teenagers do, and people who live in shared accommodation such as flatmates or students do, so that they have the option of watching something different from the people they share with, or so they can spend time alone.  But once an adult has their own living room (including couples) I would be surprised if they had a TV in the bedroom too. 

Is it standard in the US or any other countries?

Betelnut

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3830
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3938 on: July 12, 2011, 08:25:04 AM »
Here's something I've just noticed in another thread.   

The OP mentioned that they don't have a TV in their bedroom and implied that it was unusual. 

Well, none of the adults I know who have their own homes (rented or owned) have TVs in their bedrooms!  Teenagers do, and people who live in shared accommodation such as flatmates or students do, so that they have the option of watching something different from the people they share with, or so they can spend time alone.  But once an adult has their own living room (including couples) I would be surprised if they had a TV in the bedroom too. 

Is it standard in the US or any other countries?

I don't have one my bedroom (US here) but most adults, especially married couples, do.  (I prefer my bedroom to be all about sleeping and reading!)
Native Texan, Marylander currently

Sharnita

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 21678
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3939 on: July 12, 2011, 08:26:09 AM »
I'm in the US and don't have one in my bedroom either.

camlan

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8781
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3940 on: July 12, 2011, 08:29:32 AM »
Not everyone has a TV in their bedroom, but many people do. They watch the morning news as they get ready for work, or watch a show or movie before they go to sleep. And a fair number of people have a small TV in the kitchen, as well.

I don't have a TV in my bedroom. One of my friends is a single guy who lives alone has a TV in every room except the bathroom--living room, bedroom, kitchen. I think that's a bit of overkill, but it works for him.

Quite often, the main TV in the house is given over to kids and video games for a large part of the day, if there are kids in the family.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


Dindrane

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 15463
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3941 on: July 12, 2011, 09:11:26 AM »
I don't have a tv in my bedroom because my husband and I live all by ourselves in a one-bedroom apartment. :)

However, I'd put a tv in my own bedroom before I'd put it in my (hypothetical) child's bedroom.  My parents had one in theirs growing up, and they used it when they wanted to watch something different than we did (or we had to watch the smaller tv in their bedroom...).  My siblings and I didn't have tvs in our bedrooms because my parents didn't want us to watch that much of it, and probably wanted us to watch whatever we were going to in the public living room (both so they could monitor it, and so that we would at least be physically around the rest of the family).

The other advantage of having a tv in the parents' bedroom is that it's easier for them to watch shows or movies that they don't think are appropriate for their children.


Luci

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6218
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3942 on: July 12, 2011, 09:47:54 AM »
We've had a TV in the bedroom for over 25 years. My husband and rarely like the same shows. How else could I watch Heidi or Invaders from Mars while he is watching the Super Bowl or the World Series?

Used to watch the morning shows when I was getting ready for work, too.

rose red

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 7928
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3943 on: July 12, 2011, 11:27:04 AM »
I had a TV in my bedroom until the digital conversion and I never bothered getting the converter box.  It was rough at first but once the "withdraws" stopped, I've been really well rested and calm (and more well read  :)).  I doubt I'll ever have one in the bedroom again now that I know the effects of late night channel surfing.

RainhaDoTexugo

  • got married!
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 23089
  • Tatum!
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3944 on: July 12, 2011, 11:51:03 AM »
We have one in the bedroom, but we moved in in mid-March and it hasn't been plugged in yet, so that should tell you how often we use it :P  We've never intentionally purchased a bedroom TV, but we had an old, half broken hand me down tv in the bedroom for awhile, and now the old living room tv is in here, since DF bought a fancy flat screen for the living room.  It's used now and then for morning news shows.  He does bring the laptop into the bedroom some nights, and falls asleep to a movie on Netflix, which I suppose is the same idea.