Author Topic: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange  (Read 275147 times)

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Bethczar

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3945 on: July 12, 2011, 01:52:22 PM »
When I was growing up, my parents had a 13 black-and-white TV in their bedroom. I thought it was so neat that they could lie in bed & watch TV (which they seldom did) so I promised myself I would have a tv in my bedroom when I grew up.

Fast forward 15 years... I had one in my bedroom for about a year. It wasm't nearly as cool as I thought. We still have two TV's, but none in the bedroom.

Judah

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3946 on: July 12, 2011, 01:54:57 PM »
I think we're the only couple I know that doesn't have a TV in the bedroom.  DH hates the idea and I prefer to read so it works for us.
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Larrabee

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3947 on: July 12, 2011, 02:50:15 PM »
Interesting, thanks for all the TV related answers! 

I think my age is showing a bit, because as long as I've been watching TV there was a way to record shows to watch later when two people's choice clashed.  First we had a betamax ( :o) then a VCR (although they were just called videos or video players in the UK) now we have Sky Plus!


camlan

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3948 on: July 12, 2011, 02:59:50 PM »
In the past week, I've read two novels by British authors which had characters named "Gotobed."

How do you pronounce this name? Go-to-bed? Got-o-bed? Or some other way?

I'm English and I pronounce it Go-to-bed.  Just out of interest were you reading Carrie's War? It's the only book I've ever read with a character called Gotobed in.

I have a question.  Why do (primarily) people from the US say "British" instead of "English"? I define myself as English or being from the UK, I hardly ever say British.  It's something I've seen cropping up in quite a few threads here and I was wondering if I was in the minority or majority using English instead of British, can anyone enlighten me?

I saw the name in one of Dorothy Sayer's books and one by Agatha Christie.

As for English vs. British, I have no idea. I suspect a lot of Americans aren't terribly knowledgeable about England/Northern Ireland/Scotland/Wales and how they make up the UK. And then there's the United Kingdom, but we also hear Great Britain, and we also hear England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales. It's hard to know what to call someone when you're not sure exactly where they are from.

Is someone a UKian (is there even a term for this)? British? English?

I think I usually say "English", but I had just been reading a book that used "British" a lot and that was what was at the front of my mind when I was writing.
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Horace

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3949 on: July 12, 2011, 03:14:04 PM »
In the past week, I've read two novels by British authors which had characters named "Gotobed."

How do you pronounce this name? Go-to-bed? Got-o-bed? Or some other way?

I'm English and I pronounce it Go-to-bed.  Just out of interest were you reading Carrie's War? It's the only book I've ever read with a character called Gotobed in.

I have a question.  Why do (primarily) people from the US say "British" instead of "English"? I define myself as English or being from the UK, I hardly ever say British.  It's something I've seen cropping up in quite a few threads here and I was wondering if I was in the minority or majority using English instead of British, can anyone enlighten me?

I saw the name in one of Dorothy Sayer's books and one by Agatha Christie.

As for English vs. British, I have no idea. I suspect a lot of Americans aren't terribly knowledgeable about England/Northern Ireland/Scotland/Wales and how they make up the UK. And then there's the United Kingdom, but we also hear Great Britain, and we also hear England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales. It's hard to know what to call someone when you're not sure exactly where they are from.

Is someone a UKian (is there even a term for this)? British? English?

I think I usually say "English", but I had just been reading a book that used "British" a lot and that was what was at the front of my mind when I was writing.

Interesting, I'll have to keep my eyes open and see if I spot it.

Sorry if you felt like I was criticising you Camlan, I didn't mean for my post to come off that way, your post just reminded me about it, that's all.  Like I said, I wonder if it's just me who's noticed it :)

Larrabee

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3950 on: July 12, 2011, 03:21:37 PM »
In the past week, I've read two novels by British authors which had characters named "Gotobed."

How do you pronounce this name? Go-to-bed? Got-o-bed? Or some other way?

I'm English and I pronounce it Go-to-bed.  Just out of interest were you reading Carrie's War? It's the only book I've ever read with a character called Gotobed in.

I have a question.  Why do (primarily) people from the US say "British" instead of "English"? I define myself as English or being from the UK, I hardly ever say British.  It's something I've seen cropping up in quite a few threads here and I was wondering if I was in the minority or majority using English instead of British, can anyone enlighten me?

I saw the name in one of Dorothy Sayer's books and one by Agatha Christie.

As for English vs. British, I have no idea. I suspect a lot of Americans aren't terribly knowledgeable about England/Northern Ireland/Scotland/Wales and how they make up the UK. And then there's the United Kingdom, but we also hear Great Britain, and we also hear England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales. It's hard to know what to call someone when you're not sure exactly where they are from.

Is someone a UKian (is there even a term for this)? British? English?

I think I usually say "English", but I had just been reading a book that used "British" a lot and that was what was at the front of my mind when I was writing.


Our country is officially called 'The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland', when asked what country I'm from on an official form I write 'UK' if asked for my nationality I write 'British'. 

Great Britain is the name of the actual main island, and usually also means the smaller islands hovering on the edge of it such as the Isles of Wight and Mann, the Hebrides and so on, but not Ireland.

There are also lots of little islands and territories that aren't counted as part of the UK but are governed by it, such as the Falklands, Gibraltar, Bermuda and so on.

I think of myself as British, I am English but only really use that when in relation to other Brits who aren't English.  I think people from Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland tend to feel a stronger connection to their component country's identity.

P-p-p-penguin

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3951 on: July 12, 2011, 03:33:47 PM »
Here's something I've just noticed in another thread.   

The OP mentioned that they don't have a TV in their bedroom and implied that it was unusual. 

Well, none of the adults I know who have their own homes (rented or owned) have TVs in their bedrooms!  Teenagers do, and people who live in shared accommodation such as flatmates or students do, so that they have the option of watching something different from the people they share with, or so they can spend time alone.  But once an adult has their own living room (including couples) I would be surprised if they had a TV in the bedroom too. 

Is it standard in the US or any other countries?

I had a TV in my room when I lived on my own.  I have difficulty getting to sleep without it on, I don't like trying to sleep in total silence.  Creeps me out for some reason.

gollymolly2

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3952 on: July 12, 2011, 03:36:24 PM »
I had a TV in my room when I lived on my own.  I have difficulty getting to sleep without it on, I don't like trying to sleep in total silence.  Creeps me out for some reason.

Me too. I think it gives me too much time to think. Even when camping I usually have headphones on at bedtime.

P-p-p-penguin

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3953 on: July 12, 2011, 03:47:41 PM »
I had a TV in my room when I lived on my own.  I have difficulty getting to sleep without it on, I don't like trying to sleep in total silence.  Creeps me out for some reason.

Me too. I think it gives me too much time to think. Even when camping I usually have headphones on at bedtime.

I would definitely have to listen to something too.  My last camping trip was quite traumatic (and I'm not exaggerating!) so I'd need some way to keep anxiety at bay!

RainhaDoTexugo

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3954 on: July 12, 2011, 04:21:27 PM »
I like to have some background noise at night, too.  It's part of the reason I could never move away from the city, and I never sleep well when I vacation out in the country.  I miss the sirens :P

caslyn

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3955 on: July 12, 2011, 04:25:19 PM »
From the thread in family and children - we in the UK (ok, two of us) seem to be happy with a seamless morph of environments in restaurants - see below - with time. Is it just us??

I'm not sure if this is a me or a UK type thing, but we go to a lot of places where the time we go is the important thing - i.e. we'd happily take our children there for dinner at 5, but not at 7. I know people have to eat earlier sometime because of medical issues (my nana is one), but in general, if I was invited out for an adult dinner, I would expect it to be after 7pm - if we went earlier to these places (prob gastro-pub is the best term - more relaxed environment than formal dining, but extremely good/well presented food) I would expect there to be littles there. I would also expect those children to go between 7-7.30, and would be shocked if there were littles after 8.

I'm in the UK too, but I definitely know what you mean.  There are lots of places near me where you'll see families in jeans leaving around the time couples in shirts and dresses are arriving!

That's exactly what I'm talking about!

*heads over to trans-atlantic and culture-shock threads*

Ferrets

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3956 on: July 12, 2011, 04:34:37 PM »
Our country is officially called 'The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland', when asked what country I'm from on an official form I write 'UK' if asked for my nationality I write 'British'. 

[...]

I think of myself as British, I am English but only really use that when in relation to other Brits who aren't English.  I think people from Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland tend to feel a stronger connection to their component country's identity.

^ This. I'm a mixed bag* anyhow, so I tend to default to "British", even though "English" alone would also be accurate in my case.

*Along with the majority of the population. Result of being a melting-pot for millennia, plus having treated the entire world as a massive game of Risk had an Empire.

People tend to self-define as they feel comfortable. Someone, say, who was born in England, and whose parents immigrated here from India, might define themselves as any or all of the following: English / British / Asian / Indian / British Asian / British Indian, etc. 'Anglo-Indian' can refer either to someone of mixed British and Indian ancestry; or with only British ancestry and born in India (relic of the days of the Raj).

As for English vs. British, I have no idea. I suspect a lot of Americans aren't terribly knowledgeable about England/Northern Ireland/Scotland/Wales and how they make up the UK. [...] It's hard to know what to call someone when you're not sure exactly where they are from.

'British' is generally a considerably safer bet than 'English' in this case!

Quote
If you refer to a Scot or a Welsh person as 'British', the vast majority will just accept this is true as regards now, although the more nationalist may insist on a local term. Whatever happens, 'British' is right, and 'English' is not. This is a mild understatement.*

If you refer to a Republic@n-minded Northern Irish person as 'British', you may get chewed out. If you fail to refer to a Unionist-minded Northern Irish person as 'British', you may get chewed out. 'Northern Irish' is pretty neutral.

If you refer to someone from The Republic of Ireland as 'British', you are going to die.

 - Britain Versus The UK

*For 'mild', read 'massive'. ;)

P-p-p-penguin

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3957 on: July 12, 2011, 04:47:12 PM »
I think part of the British/English/etc. thing that is interesting to me is accents.  Generally you figure out where someone is from because of an accent, but British accents seem like they could be tricky to pinpoint if you're not used to them and so that could be why many USians default to 'British' instead of the specific country.

Scottish and Irish accents are very distinct from a Southern-English accent, but Scottish and Irish aren't all that distinct from each other.  However, from what I gather, all of those accents are heard with some frequency in the US (immigration, media, etc.) and so many USians can tell the difference.  Welsh accents and any English accents from the Midlands up, however, aren't all that common but if you hear one you can figure out that the person is British.

This is all just my take on things and not actually being American I have no idea if my assumptions are correct!  ETA: Obviously it's not just Britain that has this 'issue'.  Most of the time I can't tell the difference between an American and Canadian accent.  I usually can, however, differentiate a NZ accent from an Oz one.

As for the dining out at different times bit, I would agree with you there.  I wouldn't expect to see children (young children especially) out for dinner after about 7-ish either.  Many pubs, bars and restaurants here seem to change to a more adults-only ambience after about 7/8 o'clock by turning lights down and music up.

RainhaDoTexugo

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3958 on: July 12, 2011, 04:56:16 PM »
I'm a born and bred Chicagoan, and with the exception of a few specific words and regional accents, I usually can't tell the difference between an American and a Canadian accent.  Irish, Scottish, and most English accents I can distinguish, though :)

Nibsey

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3959 on: July 12, 2011, 05:02:28 PM »
I think part of the British/English/etc. thing that is interesting to me is accents.  Generally you figure out where someone is from because of an accent, but British accents seem like they could be tricky to pinpoint if you're not used to them and so that could be why many USians default to 'British' instead of the specific country.

Scottish and Irish accents are very distinct from a Southern-English accent, but Scottish and Irish aren't all that distinct from each other.  However, from what I gather, all of those accents are heard with some frequency in the US (immigration, media, etc.) and so many USians can tell the difference.  Welsh accents and any English accents from the Midlands up, however, aren't all that common but if you hear one you can figure out that the person is British.

This is all just my take on things and not actually being American I have no idea if my assumptions are correct!  ETA: Obviously it's not just Britain that has this 'issue'.  Most of the time I can't tell the difference between an American and Canadian accent.  I usually can, however, differentiate a NZ accent from an Oz one.

As for the dining out at different times bit, I would agree with you there.  I wouldn't expect to see children (young children especially) out for dinner after about 7-ish either.  Many pubs, bars and restaurants here seem to change to a more adults-only ambience after about 7/8 o'clock by turning lights down and music up.

I personally never minded when I was living in Australia when people couldn't tell where my accent was from. I use to get Welsh, American and South African alot. I wouldn't even mind if I was in England and was called British. But don't come to (southern) Ireland and call me British.
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