Author Topic: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange  (Read 275219 times)

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Giggity

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #90 on: November 18, 2010, 07:39:10 PM »
What does Irn Bru taste like? Is it really made from bridge girders? That sounds questionable safetywise...

I can't speak for its composition, but Gentleman Friend got some a couple weeks back, and it's orangey. Reminded me of Fanta or Crush.
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Musicwoman

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #91 on: November 18, 2010, 07:41:34 PM »
Australian here...

To any Americans coming to holiday in Australia - please, please remember that the words ''fanny" and ''root" have completely different meanings here.

We use ''backside" (among many others) as a euphamism for the buttocks.  ''Fanny" is a fairly vulger term for a very specifically female part of the anatomy.

We ''barrack" or ''go" for a sports team.  ''Root" is a vulgar term for Scrabble.  Few things will make an Australian squirm more than to hear how a pretty young girl roots for a particular team.
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Giggity

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #92 on: November 18, 2010, 07:45:04 PM »
Apparantly in the US a woman gets,(used to get) her husbands first name as well. Is there any other country that also does it. Personally I find it an awfull custom, and I think a lot of USians think so as well. To take the last name makes sense and is practical (though for practical reasons it shouldn't matter whose last name it is), but I do not see why the first name is also there.

However, in practice I will never be Mrs. John Smith. We will, together, be Mr. and Mrs. John Smith, but I don't know any women who refer to themselves in a solo situation by their husband's name.

IIRC, "Mrs. John Smith" without the "Mr. and" in front of it betokens that John has shuffled off this mortal coil and the Mrs. is a (presumably grieving) widow.
Words mean things.

Ferrets

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #93 on: November 18, 2010, 07:55:37 PM »
Question for British EHellions: Just what is chicken tikka masala?

Practically our national dish. ;D

[/lives in the current official Curry Capital of Britain]

Glaceon

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #94 on: November 18, 2010, 07:58:17 PM »
Snorlax's grandmother refers to herself in writing as "Mrs. Oscar Hislastname."  He passed away over a decade ago, so that may be it.  I used it on my wedding invitations for older, conservative couples.  It's at the upper levels of formality and from what I can see, it's rapidly falling into disuse.

If I ever go to Australia and forget "barracks" or "go" can I say something like "favor" or "cheer?"  Anything wrong with those?  I knew about fanny but root was a new one on me.  I love these kinds of threads!

GoldenGemini

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #95 on: November 18, 2010, 08:23:00 PM »
I am currently eating (as my lunch) a Cheese and Chive Scone.  ;D  Yum!!

One I found out the other day thanks to Reezie/MsMoonBunny is that what we call plaits, the US call braids, and what we call braids, the US call French braids.

Taffy sounds a lot like Toffee to me; is it?  We get these lolly bars called Toffee Apple that are green and pink and can remove teeth with one pull!


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M-theory

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #96 on: November 18, 2010, 08:29:44 PM »
Question for British EHellions: Just what is chicken tikka masala?

Practically our national dish. ;D

[/lives in the current official Curry Capital of Britain]

So I hear! But is it more tomatoey or creamy?

Slartibartfast

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #97 on: November 18, 2010, 08:37:25 PM »
Australian here...

To any Americans coming to holiday in Australia - please, please remember that the words ''fanny" and ''root" have completely different meanings here.

We use ''backside" (among many others) as a euphamism for the buttocks.  ''Fanny" is a fairly vulger term for a very specifically female part of the anatomy.

We ''barrack" or ''go" for a sports team.  ''Root" is a vulgar term for Scrabble.  Few things will make an Australian squirm more than to hear how a pretty young girl roots for a particular team.

Heh, my aunt and uncle live in NZ, but grew up as Americans.  They got a new neighbor a few years ago, also a recently-ex-American.  He introduced himself as "Hi, I'm Randy!"  My aunt and uncle suggested he might want to go by Randall while he's in NZ  :P  Would that be an issue in Australia too?

Luci

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #98 on: November 18, 2010, 08:37:36 PM »
Australian here...

To any Americans coming to holiday in Australia - please, please remember that the words ''fanny" and ''root" have completely different meanings here.

We use ''backside" (among many others) as a euphamism for the buttocks.  ''Fanny" is a fairly vulger term for a very specifically female part of the anatomy.

We ''barrack" or ''go" for a sports team.  ''Root" is a vulgar term for Scrabble.  Few things will make an Australian squirm more than to hear how a pretty young girl roots for a particular team.

Central US and gardener: What do you call the part of the plant that is in the soil?

I know about the V for victory here is like our one finger salute in the US. Thank you, President Nixon.

PaintingPastelPrincess

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #99 on: November 18, 2010, 08:41:31 PM »
Australian here...

To any Americans coming to holiday in Australia - please, please remember that the words ''fanny" and ''root" have completely different meanings here.

We use ''backside" (among many others) as a euphamism for the buttocks.  ''Fanny" is a fairly vulger term for a very specifically female part of the anatomy.

We ''barrack" or ''go" for a sports team.  ''Root" is a vulgar term for Scrabble.  Few things will make an Australian squirm more than to hear how a pretty young girl roots for a particular team.

Central US and gardener: What do you call the part of the plant that is in the soil?

I know about the V for victory here is like our one finger salute in the US. Thank you, President Nixon.

Doesn't it depend on if your hand is facing in or out?

GoldenGemini

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #100 on: November 18, 2010, 08:53:29 PM »
Australian here...

To any Americans coming to holiday in Australia - please, please remember that the words ''fanny" and ''root" have completely different meanings here.

We use ''backside" (among many others) as a euphamism for the buttocks.  ''Fanny" is a fairly vulger term for a very specifically female part of the anatomy.

We ''barrack" or ''go" for a sports team.  ''Root" is a vulgar term for Scrabble.  Few things will make an Australian squirm more than to hear how a pretty young girl roots for a particular team.

Heh, my aunt and uncle live in NZ, but grew up as Americans.  They got a new neighbor a few years ago, also a recently-ex-American.  He introduced himself as "Hi, I'm Randy!"  My aunt and uncle suggested he might want to go by Randall while he's in NZ  :P  Would that be an issue in Australia too?

Yes, but only for people with a 12-year-old's sense of humour *like me, snicker*  I grew up with one of my mum and dad's friends being called Randy (that was his full name, not short for Randall) and it never occurred to me until much, much later.


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GoldenGemini

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #101 on: November 18, 2010, 08:56:04 PM »
Australian here...

To any Americans coming to holiday in Australia - please, please remember that the words ''fanny" and ''root" have completely different meanings here.

We use ''backside" (among many others) as a euphamism for the buttocks.  ''Fanny" is a fairly vulger term for a very specifically female part of the anatomy.

We ''barrack" or ''go" for a sports team.  ''Root" is a vulgar term for Scrabble.  Few things will make an Australian squirm more than to hear how a pretty young girl roots for a particular team.

Central US and gardener: What do you call the part of the plant that is in the soil?

I know about the V for victory here is like our one finger salute in the US. Thank you, President Nixon.

The part of the plant in the soil is called a root.  Just as potatoes and so forth are root vegetables.  Just the context of rooting for a team makes it squicky.

V for Victory is what we use as a peace sign.  Back of the hand facing self.

V for Victory with back of hand facing others - rude. And yes, similar to your one-finger salute.


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sempronialou

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #102 on: November 18, 2010, 08:57:46 PM »
Australian here...

To any Americans coming to holiday in Australia - please, please remember that the words ''fanny" and ''root" have completely different meanings here.

We use ''backside" (among many others) as a euphamism for the buttocks.  ''Fanny" is a fairly vulger term for a very specifically female part of the anatomy.

We ''barrack" or ''go" for a sports team.  ''Root" is a vulgar term for Scrabble.  Few things will make an Australian squirm more than to hear how a pretty young girl roots for a particular team.

I heard about the "fanny" term and not using the thumbs up sign (which means "great" or "good" in the US) just before I went a tour to NZ, AU, and Fiji.  I didn't know about the "root" term.  When plants grow into the ground, what do you call those things the make so that the plant remains stable in the ground?  *Warning musician speak* Also when you are referring to the first, main note in the chord (ex. in a D major chord, it would be D), what do you refer to it as?  We call it the "root" of the chord.  I can't imagine an alternate name for that.  

GoldenGemini

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #103 on: November 18, 2010, 09:11:29 PM »
Australian here...

To any Americans coming to holiday in Australia - please, please remember that the words ''fanny" and ''root" have completely different meanings here.

We use ''backside" (among many others) as a euphamism for the buttocks.  ''Fanny" is a fairly vulger term for a very specifically female part of the anatomy.

We ''barrack" or ''go" for a sports team.  ''Root" is a vulgar term for Scrabble.  Few things will make an Australian squirm more than to hear how a pretty young girl roots for a particular team.

I heard about the "fanny" term and not using the thumbs up sign (which means "great" or "good" in the US) just before I went a tour to NZ, AU, and Fiji.  I didn't know about the "root" term.  When plants grow into the ground, what do you call those things the make so that the plant remains stable in the ground?  *Warning musician speak* Also when you are referring to the first, main note in the chord (ex. in a D major chord, it would be D), what do you refer to it as?  We call it the "root" of the chord.  I can't imagine an alternate name for that.  

What did you hear about not using the thumbs up sign?  We use it all the time, to mean "good", "okay" or "yep".


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kareng57

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #104 on: November 18, 2010, 09:16:14 PM »
What exactly is Boxing Day?  Is that when presents are opened?  When the boxes are discarded? When you take the boxes back to the stores because you don't want what's in them? Are there boxes? Yes, I put too much thought into this!

I'm not sure where the name Boxing Day originated from, but it's simply the day after Christmas.  Here in Canada it has become a lot like the Friday after Thanksgiving in the States, with big sales and crazy deals at the stores, but that's a more recent (last 20 years?) development.  In Ontario, where I live, it's a statutory holiday, so most offices and public services are closed, but retail stores, restaurants, etc. are open for business.  In my family it's just an extension of the Christmas holiday -- when I was growing up we saw one side of the family on Christmas day and the other side on Boxing Day.  Oh, and the most important part?  Hot turkey sandwiches for lunch.  Very important.  :)

Some more information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boxing_day

It's not a statutory holiday in other provinces (including mine) but IME the great majority of people in 9-to-5 type jobs do get it as a paid day off.  It would be pretty hard for them to conduct business if they remained open anyway. People who have to work don't get holiday-pay, however. I've never been a Boxing Day shopper myself - I hate crowds, no matter how good the deals might be.  And the ads can be pretty deceptive - an electronics item could be priced at about 80% off, but the fine print says  something like "limit of 4 in each store".  One of my DSs lined up in the middle of the night once and said, never again.

Re metric:  us Canadians really can't make up our minds.  Distances:  most of us have gotten pretty mainstream with metres, kilometres, etc.  Weight:  when talking about body-weights most of us still refer to pounds, although doctors/hospitals use kilograms.  Meat/deli items are sold in metric, but some stores will print Imperial in smaller print.  Canned foods are technically metric, but in weird sizes such as 298 ml.  Cooking measures:  I dutifully bought a set of metric measuring cups/spoons when the conversion was supposed to happen and have probably used them maybe twice.  Most of use still use "old" Imperial recipes, and many recipes off the Net (such as American ones) are of course Imperial anyway.