Author Topic: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange  (Read 272258 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

squashedfrog

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 522
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #15 on: November 18, 2010, 06:53:43 AM »
That's it!  Im hunting around the shops here to see if they have any pumkins left!

While we are on the subject of sweet things, what's taffy?  Is it like nougat?  And why do you pull it?

guihong

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6550
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #16 on: November 18, 2010, 06:59:16 AM »
I have one (so far):

If Guy Fawkes tried to do a terrible thing-blow up Parliament-then why do you celebrate his day with fireworks and having fun?  Or is it celebrating that he failed?

Taffy is a sticky candy made from boiled sugar, butter, and flavorings.  It's stretched to make it fluffy and lighter in texture., and it was traditionally great fun for kids.  Then it's rolled up, almost like gum.    Nougat, at least here, is a mixture of sugar or honey, roasted nuts, and fruit.  It's added to some candy bars and box chocolate.

gui



Gyburc

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1748
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #17 on: November 18, 2010, 07:04:22 AM »
UK E-Hellion here. I have a very silly question from my DH.

In the US, how do you boil water for a cup of tea? Here in the UK most people use electric kettles that plug into the wall. DH read a blog post recently that suggested that this is very unusual in the US, and that most people use a kettle that sits on the cooker instead.

Is he right??

Oh, and in answer to guihong, on 5 November we celebrate the fact that Guy Fawkes's plot was stopped and Parliament was saved! (Most of us, anyway. ;D) The idea is to remember how close a call it was. There's a children's rhyme:

Remember, remember
The fifth of November,
Gunpowder, treason and plot.
This is the reason
That gunpowder season
Should never be forgot.


When you look into the photocopier, the photocopier also looks into you

guihong

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6550
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #18 on: November 18, 2010, 07:09:15 AM »
UK E-Hellion here. I have a very silly question from my DH.

In the US, how do you boil water for a cup of tea? Here in the UK most people use electric kettles that plug into the wall. DH read a blog post recently that suggested that this is very unusual in the US, and that most people use a kettle that sits on the cooker instead.

Is he right??

Oh, and in answer to guihong, on 5 November we celebrate the fact that Guy Fawkes's plot was stopped and Parliament was saved! (Most of us, anyway. ;D) The idea is to remember how close a call it was. There's a children's rhyme:

Remember, remember
The fifth of November,
Gunpowder, treason and plot.
This is the reason
That gunpowder season
Should never be forgot.




Electric kettles are not common here, it's true.  We indeed put it on top of the burner and heat until it whistles.   We do have electric coffeepots, because coffee is drunk more than tea here.  That's why the teapots haven't caught on, and even the stovetop ones are almost more for show.

Iced tea is very common, especially across the South.  I've heard that drinking cold tea is next to heresy to most English ;).

gui



Teenyweeny

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1664
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #19 on: November 18, 2010, 07:15:09 AM »

Remember, remember
The fifth of November,
Gunpowder, treason and plot.
This is the reason
That gunpowder season
Should never be forgot.


No no no!

It's:

Remember, remember
The fifth of November,
Gunpowder, treason and plot.
I see no reason
That gunpowder treason
Should ever be forgot



squashedfrog

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 522
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #20 on: November 18, 2010, 07:20:44 AM »
I have one (so far):

If Guy Fawkes tried to do a terrible thing-blow up Parliament-then why do you celebrate his day with fireworks and having fun?  Or is it celebrating that he failed?

Taffy is a sticky candy made from boiled sugar, butter, and flavorings.  It's stretched to make it fluffy and lighter in texture., and it was traditionally great fun for kids.  Then it's rolled up, almost like gum.    Nougat, at least here, is a mixture of sugar or honey, roasted nuts, and fruit.  It's added to some candy bars and box chocolate.

gui

We celebrate that he failed. Frankly though, they were not too bright.  A group of them came in out of the rain, and noticed that the gunpowder was wet, so they put it in front of the room fire to dry out ...... KABOOM!!!

The poem goes, "Remember, remember the 5th of November, Gunpowder, treason and plot".

King James ordered celebrations when the conspirators were caught and for bonfires to be lit over the country.  Effiegies of Guy Fawkes were burned on the fire.  In days gone by (until about the 1970's I think(, children used to raise money for their fireworks and sweets by making a "Guy" out of sacks etc, and then having him on the street and asking passers by "penny for the Guy?"

Guy fawkes was tortured and hung, drawn and quartered I believe.  But we all have candy floss and sparklers now, so hey ho!

sweetgirl

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 716
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #21 on: November 18, 2010, 07:21:35 AM »
I LOVE ice tea. Peach is my favourite. My hubby worked in the states for a year and keeps talking about all the foods and drinks y'all had. Only having holidayed there I never got the chance.

Whats the difference between all your fast food places? In Australia,while we have take away food places, the big ones here are Pizza hut,dominoes,red rooster,Mcdonals,hungry jacks (burger king),Kfc and subway. There you have all these other places like wendys,popeyes,jack in a box and so on and so on....arent they all kinda the same? Or are they all so different?

My mum says Americans dont eat alot of lamb. And its expensive. Is this true?

How come Americans eat their meat so rare? Every tv show, whether fictional or cooking always has a pot roast where the meat is still heaps pink. Makes me a little squicked to see it like that.

Whats clotted cream? I keep hearing about it but I have no idea what it is!

squashedfrog

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 522
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #22 on: November 18, 2010, 07:22:03 AM »
ahh thats the poem!  

Mawkish lot us English arent we?  ;D

Teenyweeny

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1664
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #23 on: November 18, 2010, 07:22:14 AM »
I still see kids doing penny for the guy, or at least I did up until a few years ago.



squashedfrog

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 522
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #24 on: November 18, 2010, 07:24:22 AM »
I still see kids doing penny for the guy, or at least I did up until a few years ago.

Awesome!   What part of the country roughly are you based?   Nice to see that still goes on, though bet its more than a penny now!   ;D

Do they burn the guy in the middle of the bonfire afterwards?

Teenyweeny

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1664
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #25 on: November 18, 2010, 07:27:45 AM »
Well, it's usually some scally kid with an old football with a face drawn on it, and some old clothes stuffed with newspaper. I've never seen them burn it, although they probably use the cash for fireworks (and tabs).

(And if you know what tabs are, then you know what region I'm talking about  ;D)



WolfWay

  • They burnt down my house... They ate my tailor!
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2532
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #26 on: November 18, 2010, 07:39:01 AM »
We sometimes measure in 'cups' in the UK too, its not as common these days bit all my mum's school cookbooks from the 70s have the ingredients in cups.

A UK cup is 250ml.
In South Africa we have premade cup measuring sets that come in volumes of 1cup, 1/2 cup, 1/3 cup, 1/4 cup.

Like this: http://www.google.co.za/images?q=measuring%20cup%20set&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=Flamingvixen-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&source=og&sa=N&hl=en&tab=wi&biw=1200&bih=431

I had no idea that cup measures were going out of style in the UK.
It's best to love your family as you would a Siberian Tiger - from a distance, preferably separated by bars . -- Pearls Before Swine (16-May-2009)

cicero

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 17757
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #27 on: November 18, 2010, 07:49:42 AM »


Whats clotted cream? I keep hearing about it but I have no idea what it is!
i think it's something british. i KNOW it has to do with tea (or is that High Tea? the one with the cucumber sandwiches) and it's served on scones.

OK so  l learned here on Ehell that non-israelis call the spread Hummus (like we do) but the beans themselves are called chickpeas or garbanzos (we call them hummus).

and i was wondering: when i was a kid i read a lot of british books and they always ate "tea" at what we would call "supper" or "dinner" time, and from what they ate i assume it's the 'evening meal'. is that correct? is it still called tea? and why?

            Created by MyFitnessPal.com - Free Weight Loss Tools

Larrabee

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4749
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #28 on: November 18, 2010, 07:54:29 AM »
I still see kids doing penny for the guy, or at least I did up until a few years ago.

Awesome!   What part of the country roughly are you based?   Nice to see that still goes on, though bet its more than a penny now!   ;D

Do they burn the guy in the middle of the bonfire afterwards?

I'm near manchester, UK and there were a lot of penny for guys this bonfire.

I'm in Manchester, whereabouts are you? 

Didn't see any guys this year but then I do live in a block of flats, not the best location for a bonfire!

Teenyweeny

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1664
Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #29 on: November 18, 2010, 08:16:10 AM »


Whats clotted cream? I keep hearing about it but I have no idea what it is!
i think it's something british. i KNOW it has to do with tea (or is that High Tea? the one with the cucumber sandwiches) and it's served on scones.

OK so  l learned here on Ehell that non-israelis call the spread Hummus (like we do) but the beans themselves are called chickpeas or garbanzos (we call them hummus).

and i was wondering: when i was a kid i read a lot of british books and they always ate "tea" at what we would call "supper" or "dinner" time, and from what they ate i assume it's the 'evening meal'. is that correct? is it still called tea? and why?

Clotted cream is basically cream that is thick enough that it will stay on top of a scone with jam :) It's sort of buttery tasting.

What Americans think of as 'British' tea, they call high tea, but actually they're incorrect.

High tea would be a big meal eaten at around 6pm (so dinner). Most UK households now know this as 'tea'.

Afternoon tea is the affair with little sandwiches etc, and would be served at around 4pm, followed by a later dinner at around 8pm. In practice, this was/is a pretty upper class pursuit.