Author Topic: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange  (Read 264131 times)

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Shores

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #30 on: November 18, 2010, 08:23:12 AM »

Whats the difference between all your fast food places? In Australia,while we have take away food places, the big ones here are Pizza hut,dominoes,red rooster,Mcdonals,hungry jacks (burger king),Kfc and subway. There you have all these other places like wendys,popeyes,jack in a box and so on and so on....arent they all kinda the same? Or are they all so different?

Well, we don't have ALL of the ones that you may hear about. Many are regional. I've never seen a Jack in the Box, for instance. If you stick to burger places, my area has McDonalds, Burger King, Wendy's, Rally's, Hardee's, Five Guys and probably others. But yeah they all taste different. Just like a restaurant that serves similar cuisine might taste different, right? Besides they each have the own signature burgers and way different french fries. So it's really no different than having a favorite Italian restaurant.

Quote
My mum says Americans dont eat alot of lamb. And its expensive. Is this true?
Yes to both, in my experience. It is quite expensive and I've never even see it sold in my local grocery store.... I'd probably have to go to an actual butcher to get it.... I'm assuming we still have butchers somewhere.

Quote
How come Americans eat their meat so rare? Every tv show, whether fictional or cooking always has a pot roast where the meat is still heaps pink. Makes me a little squicked to see it like that.
Cause it's gooooood when it's bloody! :P Actually, I have no idea why this is an "American" thing, but I do see it WAY more than I did in Europe. My siblings and I were raised on medium-rare steak; my dad was rather passionate about tasting the meat. :P Over the years, my siblings have gone for more cooked and I've gone for even rarer, but I don't know how that because popular in the US.
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sweetgirl

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #31 on: November 18, 2010, 08:33:12 AM »
My brother went to Canada a few years back to snow and said he got a steak medium rare cause thats what he eats here. He said he had to send it back because it was rarer than what he thought it would be. LOL.

Tea time is dinner time. Alot of the oldies still use it in Oz. I call it dinner. Dessert after dinner can also be called sweets. My mum has gotten my son onto calling it that. hehehe. Drives my husband mad.

camlan

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #32 on: November 18, 2010, 08:34:47 AM »
I LOVE ice tea. Peach is my favourite. My hubby worked in the states for a year and keeps talking about all the foods and drinks y'all had. Only having holidayed there I never got the chance.

Whats the difference between all your fast food places? In Australia,while we have take away food places, the big ones here are Pizza hut,dominoes,red rooster,Mcdonals,hungry jacks (burger king),Kfc and subway. There you have all these other places like wendys,popeyes,jack in a box and so on and so on....arent they all kinda the same? Or are they all so different?

My mum says Americans dont eat alot of lamb. And its expensive. Is this true?

How come Americans eat their meat so rare? Every tv show, whether fictional or cooking always has a pot roast where the meat is still heaps pink. Makes me a little squicked to see it like that.

Whats clotted cream? I keep hearing about it but I have no idea what it is!

Fast food--There are differences in the fast food places--either in the type of food served (Wendy's has chili and baked potatoes along with chicken sandwiches and burgers) or the way it's cooked or tastes. And some of these chains are regional. There aren't any Popeyes or Sonics or Chik-Fil-As or Jack in the Boxes anywhere near me, so I've never had a chance to try them out.

The average American doesn't eat much lamb. Why, I'm not sure. Could be just that it's unfamiliar, or they don't like the taste, or that it is more expensive than other meat. It's not easy to find it in supermarkets in some areas and not found in many restaurants, unless you live in an area with an ethnic population that does enjoy lamb. (Me, I do like lamb, but don't get to eat it often.)

A lot of Americans do like rare meat, but not all of us. I certainly don't. Fortunately, it's become more acceptable to want your meat cooked, now that there is evidence of health risks for undercooked meat.

Clotted cream--I was in England for a while and discovered clotted cream. It's yummy. It's sort of in between whipped cream and butter. Perfect on a scone with jam. Very hard to find in the US, but I have found one place that usually has it. It's worth an hour's drive now and then.

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squashedfrog

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #33 on: November 18, 2010, 08:35:34 AM »
Well, it's usually some scally kid with an old football with a face drawn on it, and some old clothes stuffed with newspaper. I've never seen them burn it, although they probably use the cash for fireworks (and tabs).

(And if you know what tabs are, then you know what region I'm talking about  ;D)

Gotcha!  ;D

Ferrets

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #34 on: November 18, 2010, 08:43:55 AM »
Whether you call the evening meal tea or dinner is influenced by factors of class and geography, to a certain extent. I'm working-class and from Oop North, so for me it's "dinner" at middayish, then "tea" in the evening. Someone middle-class would be more likely to say "lunch" for the first and "dinner" for the second.

We celebrate that he failed. Frankly though, they were not too bright.  A group of them came in out of the rain, and noticed that the gunpowder was wet, so they put it in front of the room fire to dry out ...... KABOOM!!!

The poem goes, "Remember, remember the 5th of November, Gunpowder, treason and plot".

King James ordered celebrations when the conspirators were caught and for bonfires to be lit over the country.  Effiegies of Guy Fawkes were burned on the fire.


It used to be effigies of the Pope that were burnt (the event's always had a specifically anti-Catholic focus) - it wasn't till almost two centuries later that ones of Guido became the norm (and Papal effigies still popped up occasionally). Lewes still burn effigies of the Pope today. They take Bonfire Night very seriously there. ::)

Most Brits celebrating Bonfire Night these days, however, are in it purely for the fireworks, exciting pyromania, and general tradition, rather than conscious anti-Catholic sentiment, and plenty of Catholics join in with the revelries. (Including me. Only not in Lewes. ;) )
« Last Edit: November 18, 2010, 08:46:15 AM by Ferrets »

sweetgirl

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #35 on: November 18, 2010, 08:47:26 AM »
If anybody ever wants to come to Australia for a lamb roast then you are more than welcome! hehehe. Its so good, ya'll are missing out!

Also.....whats miracle whip? I know its cream....but how does it stay creamy without going yucky and watery?

Gyburc

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #36 on: November 18, 2010, 08:50:59 AM »

No no no!

It's:

Remember, remember
The fifth of November,
Gunpowder, treason and plot.
I see no reason
That gunpowder treason
Should ever be forgot


D'oh! Clearly I am too highly trained...

 :D

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camlan

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #37 on: November 18, 2010, 08:52:35 AM »
If anybody ever wants to come to Australia for a lamb roast then you are more than welcome! hehehe. Its so good, ya'll are missing out!

Also.....whats miracle whip? I know its cream....but how does it stay creamy without going yucky and watery?

Miracle Whip. Goodness, how to describe it. It's more similar to mayonnaise than anything else, I think, but it is seasoned differently. It's sometimes called "salad cream." It's used in place of mayo on sandwiches and such. There can be heated discussions as to which is better, Miracle Whip or mayo. I've just discovered that it has a Facebook page.
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Kess

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #38 on: November 18, 2010, 09:06:21 AM »
We celebrate that he failed. Frankly though, they were not too bright.  A group of them came in out of the rain, and noticed that the gunpowder was wet, so they put it in front of the room fire to dry out ...... KABOOM!!!

The poem goes, "Remember, remember the 5th of November, Gunpowder, treason and plot".

King James ordered celebrations when the conspirators were caught and for bonfires to be lit over the country.  Effiegies of Guy Fawkes were burned on the fire.


It used to be effigies of the Pope that were burnt (the event's always had a specifically anti-Catholic focus) - it wasn't till almost two centuries later that ones of Guido became the norm (and Papal effigies still popped up occasionally).

I was about to say that :).  Everyone seems to think it's Guy Fawkes on the bonfire, and it generally is now, but it never used to be.  With the way the country see-sawed back and forth between Catholic and Protestant from when Henry VIII turned the country Protestant so he could divorce his wife to marry his bit-on-the-side (who wouldn't play scrabble with him until he did, so they say), then his eldest daughter made the country Catholic again, then her sister changed it to Protestant... etc, etc, etc... the King wanted the country to celebrate the failure of the Catholics to put a Catholic monarch on the throne again.

Oh, and still plenty of "Penny for the Guy" around here.  I'm in the north Midlands.

Whether you call the evening meal tea or dinner is influenced by factors of class and geography, to a certain extent. I'm working-class and from Oop North, so for me it's "dinner" at middayish, then "tea" in the evening. Someone middle-class would be more likely to say "lunch" for the first and "dinner" for the second.

And the upper classes had/have luncheon at noon, afternoon tea with cakes and little sandwiches in the mid-afternoon, then the children had a light supper just before bed and the adults had a proper dinner at 8-ish.

Miracle Whip. Goodness, how to describe it. It's more similar to mayonnaise than anything else, I think, but it is seasoned differently. It's sometimes called "salad cream." It's used in place of mayo on sandwiches and such. There can be heated discussions as to which is better, Miracle Whip or mayo. I've just discovered that it has a Facebook page.

We have something called salad cream here too, I wonder if it's the same thing?  Sort of ... tart to taste?  Not creamy like mayo.

Cellardoor14

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #39 on: November 18, 2010, 12:04:35 PM »
Are licorice and blackcurrant candies as good as they sound? I've been dying to try them ever since I first heard about them.

No.  ;)

As a American (originally from Texas) who has lived overseas for around ten years, I still have no love for liquorice allsort or black currents.  The liquorice here tastes nothing like the American red variety, and is more like a STRONGER version of the old fashion black kind.  I personally find black currant too sweet, and the favouring a bit too chemically.

Lamb can be expensive in the US.  My family who live in NYC, DC, and North Texas, would like to eat more of it, but it can get very pricey.

Meal names depend on region and class... My good friend from the North refers to lunch as "dinner" and the evening meal as "tea". Appetisers are "starters" here, and entrees are called "mains" with dessert normally called "pudding" or "afters".  

(We're a lunch/supper or dinner/dessert household)

My MIL insists that in South Africa entrees are appetisers/starters.. but I have to say I've not noticed that when there.

Clotted cream is a very-very- thick non sweet cream which is normally spread on scones... Very nice! We are very big fans of cream teas, and have a running guide/commentary of the best places around home and abroad.

We also celebrate Bonfire Night (which often now gets connected to Diwali here in South London) despite the old anti-Catholic beginnings.  I have never see any child asking "For a penny for the guy.", but do hear often from adults how it use to be very popular.

Miracle Whip is a lot like mayonnaise... I think salad cream may be slightly runnier.  Also most Americans probably wouldn't think to put mayo on top of a green salad.

Edited to Add: You can make a pumpkin pie here in the UK as long as you can get a pumpkin.  There are several recipes of UK cooking/BBC websites which are good.  I make a couple every year around this time as they are my favourite dessert.  Also if you can't get pumpkin, sweet potato/sweet potato pie is similar and also tasty..... What can I say?  I'm from the South.  :)

« Last Edit: November 18, 2010, 12:27:18 PM by Cellardoor14 »



Slartibartfast

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #40 on: November 18, 2010, 12:37:20 PM »
Lamb is also a seasonal thing here in the US - you can usually only find it in regular grocery stores right before Easter.  (That doesn't mean you can't find it in a specialty store at other times, or in a particularly large supermarket, but even then you probably won't have any choice as to cuts or size!)

Do y'all have eggnog or boiled custard over there?  Eggnog usually starts showing up around the beginning of November here, but Boiled Custard is still harder to find.  And my DH loves it, so I always have to look extra-hard at this time of year  :P

Slartibartfast

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #41 on: November 18, 2010, 12:41:25 PM »
Also.....whats miracle whip? I know its cream....but how does it stay creamy without going yucky and watery?

The Wikipedia article on Miracle Whip gives the basic idea - mayo is egg yolk, oil, and vinegar.  Miracle Whip is all that plus some (cheaper, and lower-calorie) salad dressing.  They do taste different, and both come in regular and low-fat versions.  Some people feel very strongly about which product (mayo or Miracle Whip and regular or low-fat of each) should be used for which things, and my dad lectures you at length about it if you ask  :P

Cellardoor14

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #42 on: November 18, 2010, 12:53:08 PM »
Lamb is also a seasonal thing here in the US - you can usually only find it in regular grocery stores right before Easter.  (That doesn't mean you can't find it in a specialty store at other times, or in a particularly large supermarket, but even then you probably won't have any choice as to cuts or size!)

Do y'all have eggnog or boiled custard over there?  Eggnog usually starts showing up around the beginning of November here, but Boiled Custard is still harder to find.  And my DH loves it, so I always have to look extra-hard at this time of year  :P

You can get Eggnog Lattes at Starbucks, but there aren't cartons of eggnog in the shops.... However, I have a couple recipes for it so we normally have the full/fat alcohol version a few times during the holidays.   :)

I'm afraid I don't know the difference between boiled custard and regular custard though.  We go through obscene amounts of regular custard as it's my son's favourite dessert.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2010, 12:57:13 PM by Cellardoor14 »



Luci

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #43 on: November 18, 2010, 01:13:56 PM »
Hi
When I was in a hotel in Germany (Berlin) once, they had little bottles of vodka on the breakfast buffet table and tomato juice too.  I was like ... WHOA!

I burst out laughing, so I had to tell DH about this. He looked kind of quizzical and said, "And her problem would be..............?"

(Our international travel consists of 30 minutes in Mexico and about 2 weeks totao in Canada.)

Now, back to reading the thread.

Seraphia

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #44 on: November 18, 2010, 01:35:46 PM »
Something that has always rather bothered me:

What exactly is a scone? I've seen them at coffee shops and such as a sort of sweet flaky pastry. I guess I always assumed they were like biscotti in that the commercial version is so far removed from the real thing that there's no comparison.

Also, is the train system complicated over there? I read a lot of Agatha Christie novels, and they're always using train schedules as alibis, and I get completely confused.
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