Author Topic: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange  (Read 269714 times)

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P-p-p-penguin

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3960 on: July 12, 2011, 05:15:42 PM »
I'm a born and bred Chicagoan, and with the exception of a few specific words and regional accents, I usually can't tell the difference between an American and a Canadian accent.  Irish, Scottish, and most English accents I can distinguish, though :)

Oh no, my theory is being disproved! :p  I totally wouldn't have expected that.  Chichago is pretty close to Canada isn't it (as closeness goes in a country as large as the US!)?

I personally never minded when I was living in Australia when people couldn't tell where my accent was from. I use to get Welsh, American and South African alot. I wouldn't even mind if I was in England and was called British. But don't come to (southern) Ireland and call me British.

Ooo goodness no.  I sometimes forget because I have family in Belfast which obviously isn't independent from the mainland, but I'd never refer to an Irishman (or woman) as anything other than Irish anyway :)

Nibsey

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3961 on: July 12, 2011, 06:03:11 PM »
I personally never minded when I was living in Australia when people couldn't tell where my accent was from. I use to get Welsh, American and South African alot. I wouldn't even mind if I was in England and was called British. But don't come to (southern) Ireland and call me British.

Ooo goodness no.  I sometimes forget because I have family in Belfast which obviously isn't independent from the mainland, but I'd never refer to an Irishman (or woman) as anything other than Irish anyway :)

While I'm sure no one on e-hell would do this, it happens more often than you think.  ::)
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MrsJWine

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3962 on: July 12, 2011, 07:33:24 PM »
I keep seeing news items about various large babies being born. All of them have gestational diabetes. I was curious about how big the largest baby without gestational diabetes was (or any other condition that would make them be born abnormally large), and I can't find it anywhere. This one little things is driving me crazy.


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Aggiesque

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3963 on: July 12, 2011, 07:37:51 PM »
MrsJ- My friend has a 12 1/2 lber, no diabetes or other issues, 2nd child. First was 10lbs, her sisters were all9-12lbs as well. I believe she said she and her sister were both 10 something. Large babies run in their family; they are also tall ladies (although not overweight at all).

I think IV fluids contribute a lot, too- babies soak up so much extra water when mom's on an IV for a long time!
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MrsJWine

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3964 on: July 12, 2011, 07:46:40 PM »
MrsJ- My friend has a 12 1/2 lber, no diabetes or other issues, 2nd child. First was 10lbs, her sisters were all9-12lbs as well. I believe she said she and her sister were both 10 something. Large babies run in their family; they are also tall ladies (although not overweight at all).

I think IV fluids contribute a lot, too- babies soak up so much extra water when mom's on an IV for a long time!

My first was 10+ lbs and one week early; first question I got was, "Did you have gestational diabetes?" (no)  So I know huge babies can be born without it; I was just wondering what the record was.


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baglady

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3965 on: July 12, 2011, 09:19:29 PM »
I'm American and I say British because I would hate to inadvertently offend someone by calling them something they aren't (e.g., calling a Welsh person English), if I can't be absolutely sure of where they're from. If I do know the person's exact nationality, I'll use it.

But I think the fact that the language we Americans speak is called English may tie our tongues at times. "He speaks English with an English accent" just sounds weird to me. My 'Mercan brain has an easier time with "He has a British accent" or "He speaks British English." (Which to us means the way they talk in England, not Scotland or Wales or Northern Ireland.)
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kareng57

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3966 on: July 12, 2011, 09:40:03 PM »
I'm a born and bred Chicagoan, and with the exception of a few specific words and regional accents, I usually can't tell the difference between an American and a Canadian accent.  Irish, Scottish, and most English accents I can distinguish, though :)

Oh no, my theory is being disproved! :p  I totally wouldn't have expected that.  Chichago is pretty close to Canada isn't it (as closeness goes in a country as large as the US!)?

I personally never minded when I was living in Australia when people couldn't tell where my accent was from. I use to get Welsh, American and South African alot. I wouldn't even mind if I was in England and was called British. But don't come to (southern) Ireland and call me British.

Ooo goodness no.  I sometimes forget because I have family in Belfast which obviously isn't independent from the mainland, but I'd never refer to an Irishman (or woman) as anything other than Irish anyway :)


It's not always border-proximity, though.  I'm in BC Canada within an hour's drive to Washington state - and within a few miles stateside I can hear the accent difference (and of course they can hear ours).  It seems that it's different further East however - I've talked to people in Minnesota and Wisconsin who "sound" Canadian and apparently that's what they get told all the time.

Ehelldame

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3967 on: July 12, 2011, 11:23:55 PM »
At 271 pages big, it seems to me that this topic needs to become its own folder with sub folders.  Suggestions for sub folders before I make this happen?

Bethalize

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3968 on: July 13, 2011, 04:49:58 AM »
At 271 pages big, it seems to me that this topic needs to become its own folder with sub folders.  Suggestions for sub folders before I make this happen?

I don't think it needs subfolders right away.

atirial

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3969 on: July 13, 2011, 04:56:25 AM »
Our country is officially called 'The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland', when asked what country I'm from on an official form I write 'UK' if asked for my nationality I write 'British'. 

[...]

I think of myself as British, I am English but only really use that when in relation to other Brits who aren't English.  I think people from Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland tend to feel a stronger connection to their component country's identity.

^ This. I'm a mixed bag* anyhow, so I tend to default to "British", even though "English" alone would also be accurate in my case.
I go for British by default - with Scottish, English and Welsh in the family, it's the best way to avoid being told off by the other two. Picking one causes rows.

kglory

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3970 on: July 13, 2011, 05:24:04 AM »
I'm American and I say British because I would hate to inadvertently offend someone by calling them something they aren't (e.g., calling a Welsh person English), if I can't be absolutely sure of where they're from. If I do know the person's exact nationality, I'll use it.

But I think the fact that the language we Americans speak is called English may tie our tongues at times. "He speaks English with an English accent" just sounds weird to me. My 'Mercan brain has an easier time with "He has a British accent" or "He speaks British English." (Which to us means the way they talk in England, not Scotland or Wales or Northern Ireland.)

That's a good point.  I'd also add that my experience, as an American, is that a lot people here aren't really sure of what the difference between British & English, or between England, Great Britain, and the UK.  So they are used interchangeably. 

People generally know that Scottish is Scotland, and Irish is Ireland, but they may not know that there are 2 components of Ireland - one its own country, and one that's part of the UK.  And my guess is many people in the US would not know that England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland are the 4 countries that comprise the UK, nor that British is the umbrella term for someone from any of these countries. 


MsMarjorie

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3971 on: July 13, 2011, 05:29:19 AM »
At 271 pages big, it seems to me that this topic needs to become its own folder with sub folders.  Suggestions for sub folders before I make this happen?

Can we just start "Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange Part 2" and lock this one?

Or if it were to become its own folder perhaps the sub folders could be country names?  or Food, Shopping, Family, Traffic, Travel etc
« Last Edit: July 13, 2011, 05:31:28 AM by MsMarjorie »

iridaceae

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3972 on: July 13, 2011, 05:35:03 AM »
From the thread in family and children - we in the UK (ok, two of us) seem to be happy with a seamless morph of environments in restaurants - see below - with time. Is it just us??

I'm not sure if this is a me or a UK type thing, but we go to a lot of places where the time we go is the important thing - i.e. we'd happily take our children there for dinner at 5, but not at 7. I know people have to eat earlier sometime because of medical issues (my nana is one), but in general, if I was invited out for an adult dinner, I would expect it to be after 7pm - if we went earlier to these places (prob gastro-pub is the best term - more relaxed environment than formal dining, but extremely good/well presented food) I would expect there to be littles there. I would also expect those children to go between 7-7.30, and would be shocked if there were littles after 8.

I'm in the UK too, but I definitely know what you mean.  There are lots of places near me where you'll see families in jeans leaving around the time couples in shirts and dresses are arriving!

That's exactly what I'm talking about!

*heads over to trans-atlantic and culture-shock threads*

I think it really depends on where you are in the US. Here in Tucson because of the high temperatures for much of the year and the fact that Tucson likes to think of itself as a small town almost no restaurants have a fancy dress code. 

I went out to eat with my dad tonight at one of the fancier restaurants in town- the prices are high for Tucson- $34 for a petite filet mignon without any sides, $9 for a simple dinner salad and a fancy wine selection- and felt perfectly comfortable in casual pants and a polo shirt and they were seating people without any hassle (and not sticking them in far away corners, either) who were wearing tee-shirts and shorts.

It's something I love about Tucson. Casual dress rules.

Gabrielle

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3973 on: July 13, 2011, 06:14:57 AM »
At 271 pages big, it seems to me that this topic needs to become its own folder with sub folders.  Suggestions for sub folders before I make this happen?

How about continents/large cultural areas? USA, Europe, Britain, North/South Asia, Australia & NZ & Pacific.

sweetgirl

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Re: Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange
« Reply #3974 on: July 13, 2011, 07:45:19 AM »
mrs j wine theres a documentary about big babies filmed in the u.k and I believe they said the biggest baby was 14pounds, born in the 90's I think.