Author Topic: This little piggy . . . and other rhymes  (Read 1215 times)

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scotcat60

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Re: This little piggy . . . and other rhymes
« Reply #30 on: Today at 06:56:34 AM »
Daisy Daisy the coppers are after you
If they catch you they'll give you a year or two
They'll tie you up with wire behind a black maria
So ring your bell and pedal like h*ll
Cause the coppers are after you!

cabbageweevil

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Re: This little piggy . . . and other rhymes
« Reply #31 on: Today at 07:03:47 AM »
From the UK, but not in English -- possibly not in any known tongue !  A short rhythmic chant, not actually rhyming, which has come down in our family over at least the past hundred years -- recited by parents to kids, through the generations. It goes (approximately) as follows:

Dummocka, dummocka, oakan-doran,
Allowee-hand, and off-tand, and sheeran;
Krish-tin, shtoopan,
Ay, nay, nay, nay, nay !

Some in the family, have the notion that this jingle may possibly come from Swedish.  Also; during World War I, my mother's parents became friends with a Belgian refugee family -- conceivably, the "thing" could have come from them -- it might with a bit of exercise of the imagination, be suspected to be some sort of mutation of Flemish?  If by any remote chance anyone here is acquainted with the above "stuff", and knows its origin -- I'd be fascinated to hear !



oz diva

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Re: This little piggy . . . and other rhymes
« Reply #32 on: Today at 07:47:35 AM »
Not a nursey rhyme, but we used to sing They tried to make me go to ballet, I said no no no.

Victoria

Lillybet

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Re: This little piggy . . . and other rhymes
« Reply #33 on: Today at 08:38:24 AM »
From the UK, but not in English -- possibly not in any known tongue !  A short rhythmic chant, not actually rhyming, which has come down in our family over at least the past hundred years -- recited by parents to kids, through the generations. It goes (approximately) as follows:

Dummocka, dummocka, oakan-doran,
Allowee-hand, and off-tand, and sheeran;
Krish-tin, shtoopan,
Ay, nay, nay, nay, nay !

Some in the family, have the notion that this jingle may possibly come from Swedish.  Also; during World War I, my mother's parents became friends with a Belgian refugee family -- conceivably, the "thing" could have come from them -- it might with a bit of exercise of the imagination, be suspected to be some sort of mutation of Flemish?  If by any remote chance anyone here is acquainted with the above "stuff", and knows its origin -- I'd be fascinated to hear !

There is a lot of evidence that Dutch and Flemish settlers in the UK took back nursery rhymes when they returned home and over time the language devolved away from English (which was nonsense words to a Dutch speaker anyway) to actual nonsense words. Apparently the only way you can work out the original is in the melody and the tempo.

I love the history of nursery rhymes and there is an excellent book called Pop Goes The Weasel which goes through the history of the most popular ones (although there is controversy about the authors evaluation of Humpty Dumpty).

I have been listening to old Playschool tapes (an Aussie television show for kids) in eh car with Little Bet. I've found several that don't quite match with what I remember. Do the wheels on the bus go up and down all the way to town, or through the city streets or all day long?

However my favourite one at the moment comes from the 1980s Playschool tape...

Humpty planted cabbages
He wanted them to grow
He gave them milk and lemonade
And poked them with his toe


They didn't grow you know.