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Author Topic: Captain Know-It-All stories  (Read 511830 times)

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Hillia

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #1050 on: August 28, 2014, 05:12:30 PM »
Ghost in the Little House is great, but it's also very specifically slanted. The good thing is, you get chunks of Rose's diary. But Becoming Laura Ingalls Wilder is also a good resource. And yes, I've done a bunch of critical work comparing Laura's originals and Rose's edits on sections with specific political ideology (namely, The Fourth of July scenes), and the differences are amazing. Also, blind Mary as portrayed in Laura's originals is not the passive, quiet, beatific Victorian maiden in the LH books. Pa was often out to pull one over on the government and wasn't above a little lyin' and cheatin'. And Ma was good for a couple zingers. (I always think of the "They that dance must pay the fiddler" comment about Laura's pregnancy in the First Four Years.) In fact need to get my hands on a non-Roger MacBride-edited First Four Years. THAT would be amazing.

I'm also curious how much editing they've done on the Pioneer Girl mss. I'm so excited about that I could slap Nellie Oleson!

See? I told you I was a CKIA.
There's a scene in By the Shores of Silver Lake, I think, where Aunt Docia and Uncle Whatsisname and Cousin Lena are stealing supplies from the railroad company. And it's presented as all right because the railroad didn't pay Uncle enough.

I remember that, because Aunt Docia saying that her husband 'worked like a nailer' for the railroad.  I'm pretty sure the original text didn't use 'nailer' but an extremely offensive racial slur that would have pretty commonplace back then.

Sirius

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #1051 on: August 28, 2014, 05:28:09 PM »
As an aside, you know what I've been told when talking about astronomical things?  "You're a girl - how do you know that?"  I was helping out a friend who had his telescopes set up for a church Youth Night, and he'd asked me to help answer questions, etc.  I was explaining what one of the telescopes was focused on (the half Moon) and that the boundary between light and dark was called the "terminator."  I heard all kinds of remarks about how I shouldn't know things like that since I'm a girl.  (I was in my 30s, so I wasn't exactly a 'girl' at the time.)  Had news for them - I'd probably been interested in astronomy longer than most of those teenaged guys had been alive. 

jedikaiti

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #1052 on: August 28, 2014, 07:53:29 PM »
I'm sitting here eating a rather disappointing lunch - we tried to make vegan hash the other day with potatoes and vegan sausages, and it was a disaster.  The sausages were fine (Tofurky brand - we have them all the time), but the recipe didn't give very good directions on how to cook hash browns, so the spuds were gluey and half-cooked and yuck.

Where does the CKIA come in?  Well, I posted about this on Facebook, and I got one response that said something like "Real vegans should only eat grains and legumes and vegetables.  I'll never understand why vegans eat meat substitutes."  Another response said "I can tolerate vegans so long as they're not holier-than-thou.  Please don't become one of 'those' types of vegans, (Shalamar)."

First of all, not that it really matters, but I'm not a vegan - my daughter is.  We cook a lot of vegan dishes for her sake, plus it's healthier for us.  Second of all, whose business is it what "type" of vegan I am?  Hmph.

re: Hash Browns - bake the potatoes the night before, let cool overnight, then grate & cook the next morning. :-) That's how my hubby does it, anyway (I can ask for more details if you'd like) and they always turn out great.
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

"The problem with re-examining your brilliant ideas is that more often than not, you discover they are the intellectual equivalent of saying, 'Hold my beer and watch this!'" - Cindy Couture

magician5

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #1053 on: August 28, 2014, 10:42:46 PM »
Hash brown trick: great idea!
There is no 'way to peace.' Peace is the way.

Mel the Redcap

  • Scheming Foreign Hussy married to a Good Ethnic Boy!
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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #1054 on: August 29, 2014, 12:23:17 AM »
As an aside, you know what I've been told when talking about astronomical things?  "You're a girl - how do you know that?"  I was helping out a friend who had his telescopes set up for a church Youth Night, and he'd asked me to help answer questions, etc.  I was explaining what one of the telescopes was focused on (the half Moon) and that the boundary between light and dark was called the "terminator."  I heard all kinds of remarks about how I shouldn't know things like that since I'm a girl.  (I was in my 30s, so I wasn't exactly a 'girl' at the time.)  Had news for them - I'd probably been interested in astronomy longer than most of those teenaged guys had been alive.

I cannot stand gendered expectations and prejudices!!! "You can't know that, you're a guuuuuurl!" "You shouldn't like that, you're a booooyyyy!" Aaaaugh!!!

I like a bunch of 'girly' things. I also like a bunch of 'boyish' things. The looks I've gotten in the past when I've walked up to a shop counter to buy a knitting magazine, a patchwork magazine, and three different console gaming magazines range from startled to aghast to offended. And then there's the comments! One guy online was thanking me for explaining something to him in-game, I typed something that revealed my gender, and he told me "Oh. I wouldn't have asked you if I'd known you were a girl." Then he was surprised that I took offence! *grump* >:(
"Set aphasia to stun!"

Allyson

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #1055 on: August 29, 2014, 01:25:10 AM »
And most of these people also seem to believe that gender roles have remained immutable throughout time and culture. I notice that a lot when people nowadays talk about real men not expressing emotion or caring about their appearance. The exact opposite was expected of men in the 17th and 18th centuries. Same with the whole 'pink is for girls blue is for boys' thing...the opposite was true in the Victorian times. But some people really seem to think there are two giant categories labeled Girl and Boy and everything is divided into one or the other. Which also leads to truly bizarre situations like some *food* being coded as 'girly' or 'boyish'...

Mel the Redcap

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #1056 on: August 29, 2014, 02:57:09 AM »
Yup, sweet things are 'girly', red meat is 'manly' and so on. There's a dark chocolate version of Pocky that's marketed as 'Men's Pocky' in Japan, because over there guys really aren't supposed to like sweet things. ::) :P
"Set aphasia to stun!"

parrot_girl

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #1057 on: August 29, 2014, 04:12:19 AM »
Ghost in the Little House is great, but it's also very specifically slanted. The good thing is, you get chunks of Rose's diary. But Becoming Laura Ingalls Wilder is also a good resource. And yes, I've done a bunch of critical work comparing Laura's originals and Rose's edits on sections with specific political ideology (namely, The Fourth of July scenes), and the differences are amazing. Also, blind Mary as portrayed in Laura's originals is not the passive, quiet, beatific Victorian maiden in the LH books. Pa was often out to pull one over on the government and wasn't above a little lyin' and cheatin'. And Ma was good for a couple zingers. (I always think of the "They that dance must pay the fiddler" comment about Laura's pregnancy in the First Four Years.) In fact need to get my hands on a non-Roger MacBride-edited First Four Years. THAT would be amazing.

I'm also curious how much editing they've done on the Pioneer Girl mss. I'm so excited about that I could slap Nellie Oleson!

See? I told you I was a CKIA.
There's a scene in By the Shores of Silver Lake, I think, where Aunt Docia and Uncle Whatsisname and Cousin Lena are stealing supplies from the railroad company. And it's presented as all right because the railroad didn't pay Uncle enough.

I remember that, because Aunt Docia saying that her husband 'worked like a nailer' for the railroad.  I'm pretty sure the original text didn't use 'nailer' but an extremely offensive racial slur that would have pretty commonplace back then.
Both on topic and related to this tangent- I thought you would appreciate a link to a letter from Rose to Laura about By the Shores of Silver Lake.
http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_vault/2014/04/21/rose_wilder_lane_laura_ingalls_wilder_a_letter_from_their_editorial_collaboration.html

It talks about that very scene (Rose was against putting it in). On the Captain Know-It-All front, Rose smugly assures Laura that men working on the railroad in a very isolated environment would have posed no sexual threat whatsoever to Ma and the girls, dismissing Laura's first-hand evidence!!!
I always wonder if Laura managed to get that scene in about the thirteen year old daughter of the laundress getting married, just to show that yes, there was a threat. Poor thirteen year old. I hope she didn't die in childbirth. :(
(and I am totally pre-ordering Pioneer Girl! Squee!)

z_squared82

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #1058 on: August 29, 2014, 08:27:35 AM »
Well, now I just need to go reread all the Little House on the Prairie books.  ;D

On the CKIA front, I used to work with a man who was, what I call, a friend adjacent. We weren't friend but we had a lot of friends in common. The very first night I ever met him the first thing he does is pick a grammar fight. About the word "myriad". Now, myriad can mean both "10,000" or "a great number of". But he was convinced that anyone who said/wrote "a myriad of" was a complete imbecile because you would never say "a 10,000 of". Because the other definition was a dang dirty lie? And now amount of Merriam-Webster would convince him he was wrong.

#borecore

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #1059 on: August 29, 2014, 09:14:27 AM »
Well, he was right. "A myriad of" something is as right as "irregardless" is -- it's only considered acceptable because it's been used so darn much,  not because it's correct.

z_squared82

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #1060 on: August 29, 2014, 09:25:59 AM »
Well, he was right. "A myriad of" something is as right as "irregardless" is -- it's only considered acceptable because it's been used so darn much,  not because it's correct.

No, he's not. Merriam Webster lists "an infinite number of" as a legitimate definition of myriad. It is a meaning that he refused to accept b/c he's a egomaniac. "Irregardless" is in the dictionary to tell you it's nonstandard usage of regardless, complete with star to tell your it's an Americanism.

I just looked it up. Again.

violinp

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #1061 on: August 29, 2014, 09:47:27 AM »
Well, he was right. "A myriad of" something is as right as "irregardless" is -- it's only considered acceptable because it's been used so darn much,  not because it's correct.

No, he's not. Merriam Webster lists "an infinite number of" as a legitimate definition of myriad. It is a meaning that he refused to accept b/c he's a egomaniac. "Irregardless" is in the dictionary to tell you it's nonstandard usage of regardless, complete with star to tell your it's an Americanism.

I just looked it up. Again.

I think what jmarvellous was saying is that "a myriad of" is wrong. You'd say "myriad shoes," not "a myriad of shoes," because that's redundant.
"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter


Kariachi

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #1062 on: August 29, 2014, 09:48:15 AM »
Yup, sweet things are 'girly', red meat is 'manly' and so on. There's a dark chocolate version of Pocky that's marketed as 'Men's Pocky' in Japan, because over there guys really aren't supposed to like sweet things. ::) :P

One day my dad came home from work with a big bag of dark chocolate and a look of total confusion. He had grabbed the bag to share, but one of the other men had said that "men don't eat dark chocolate". None of the other guys would touch it after that, it was just my dad and the womenfolk. We still tease him about how we can't share our dark chocolate with him 'cause he's a guy and they don't eat dark chocolate don'tcha know*. ;D



*yes we still share the chocolate, it's a family thing
"Heh. Forgive our manners, little creature that we may well kill and eat you is no excuse for rudeness."

SamiHami

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #1063 on: August 29, 2014, 09:50:49 AM »
Yup, sweet things are 'girly', red meat is 'manly' and so on. There's a dark chocolate version of Pocky that's marketed as 'Men's Pocky' in Japan, because over there guys really aren't supposed to like sweet things. ::) :P

One day my dad came home from work with a big bag of dark chocolate and a look of total confusion. He had grabbed the bag to share, but one of the other men had said that "men don't eat dark chocolate". None of the other guys would touch it after that, it was just my dad and the womenfolk. We still tease him about how we can't share our dark chocolate with him 'cause he's a guy and they don't eat dark chocolate don'tcha know*. ;D



*yes we still share the chocolate, it's a family thing

That's weird. My dad loves dark chocolate. And he's a man, so ... ??? I wonder who thought up that "rule."  ::)

What have you got? Is it food? Is it for me? I want it whatever it is!

#borecore

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #1064 on: August 29, 2014, 09:51:27 AM »
Well, he was right. "A myriad of" something is as right as "irregardless" is -- it's only considered acceptable because it's been used so darn much,  not because it's correct.

No, he's not. Merriam Webster lists "an infinite number of" as a legitimate definition of myriad. It is a meaning that he refused to accept b/c he's a egomaniac. "Irregardless" is in the dictionary to tell you it's nonstandard usage of regardless, complete with star to tell your it's an Americanism.

I just looked it up. Again.

See, I read that and note that if the definition of the word includes "of" then you don't need to say "of" afterward. "A an infinite number of of things" is practically nonsense; "An infinite number of" things makes sense, though.

However, I concede that plenty of people use the noun form, and it's perfectly obvious what they're referring to. Just because some (I) see it as excessive doesn't mean it's blatantly wrong, merely wrong as the common, American English adjectival form.

It's a matter of whether you want to use 3 words when 1 will do; as a newspaper editor, I always changed it. The AP Stylebook specifically says not to use "of."

(Side note: My M-W dictionary does not include the "of" bit, and certainly does not say "infinite"; it merely says "a great number". It does note that the noun usage is archaic but not incorrect.)