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Author Topic: Captain Know-It-All stories  (Read 511855 times)

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RingTailedLemur

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #900 on: April 07, 2013, 06:47:36 AM »
RingTailedLemur wrote:

"Yes, we are small monkeys - but we come from Madagascar, not Africa"

And that, boys and girls, is the definition of irony.

Virg

Okay, so I misunderstood something about an animal I think is cute and graciously accepted correction.  I'm not really a lemur, either.  There is no need to shame me over it.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2013, 06:51:09 AM by RingTailedLemur »

Virg

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #901 on: April 07, 2013, 07:46:59 AM »
RingTailedLemur, I intended no shame at all.  I just found it ironically funny that a comment about corrections contained a story that led to multiple layers of "But wait..."  I really meant to include iridaceae's comment in that quote but I forgot.  The phrasing is lifted directly from Adam Savage.

Virg

RingTailedLemur

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #902 on: April 07, 2013, 08:01:30 AM »
Okay, sorry.

Hillia

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #903 on: April 07, 2013, 10:17:26 AM »
When my  mom was pregnant with me in 1962, she lived on a diet of coffee and cigarettes; she'd have tuna fish for breakfast, one hard boiled egg for lunch.  Her doctor wouldn't 'let' her gain more than I think 14 pounds, because 'he didn't want her coming back after the baby was born complaining about how much weight she gained'.  The best part?  My mother was an RN, and at this point had been managing the recovery room for several years.  But in those days, what Doctor says is gospel.

gramma dishes

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #904 on: April 07, 2013, 10:37:37 AM »

...   It's like the gaydar, except it works on Christians :)
Praydar?

LOL!   ;D ;D ;D

Addy

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #905 on: April 07, 2013, 11:49:36 AM »
When my  mom was pregnant with me in 1962, she lived on a diet of coffee and cigarettes; she'd have tuna fish for breakfast, one hard boiled egg for lunch.  Her doctor wouldn't 'let' her gain more than I think 14 pounds, because 'he didn't want her coming back after the baby was born complaining about how much weight she gained'.  The best part?  My mother was an RN, and at this point had been managing the recovery room for several years.  But in those days, what Doctor says is gospel.

I changed doctors when at my first prenatal visit, he said "we don't like our girls to gain more than 17 or 18 pounds." Yeah, that's not patronizing in any way.  ::)

gramma dishes

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #906 on: April 07, 2013, 12:01:46 PM »

I changed doctors when at my first prenatal visit, he said "we don't like our girls to gain more than 17 or 18 pounds." Yeah, that's not patronizing in any way.  ::)

    :o

Cami

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #907 on: April 07, 2013, 03:21:31 PM »
When my  mom was pregnant with me in 1962, she lived on a diet of coffee and cigarettes; she'd have tuna fish for breakfast, one hard boiled egg for lunch.  Her doctor wouldn't 'let' her gain more than I think 14 pounds, because 'he didn't want her coming back after the baby was born complaining about how much weight she gained'.  The best part?  My mother was an RN, and at this point had been managing the recovery room for several years.  But in those days, what Doctor says is gospel.
My mother was an RN and she followed some realllllly stupid "rules" her doctor laid out. Many years later, she looked back and said, 'CRIVINS! was I thinking? I guess we were so brainwashed in nursing school about doctor=god, that we stopped thinking for ourselves." Amongst his priceless comments:

1. There is no such thing as morning sickness. Any woman who doesn't feel good during her pregnancy is just dramatic and/or a wimp and/or hates her unborn child.
2. Older children hate babies and should be kept away from them at all times. If an older child is left alone with a baby, they may smother it. Hence, when my sister was born, I was only allowed near her once the first year of her life-- at Xmas to take a picture. I have a clear memory of being allowed to stand near her in her bassinet and then being told to get out of the room.

siamesecat2965

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #908 on: April 07, 2013, 04:00:28 PM »
When my  mom was pregnant with me in 1962, she lived on a diet of coffee and cigarettes; she'd have tuna fish for breakfast, one hard boiled egg for lunch.  Her doctor wouldn't 'let' her gain more than I think 14 pounds, because 'he didn't want her coming back after the baby was born complaining about how much weight she gained'.  The best part?  My mother was an RN, and at this point had been managing the recovery room for several years.  But in those days, what Doctor says is gospel.

I changed doctors when at my first prenatal visit, he said "we don't like our girls to gain more than 17 or 18 pounds." Yeah, that's not patronizing in any way.  ::)

I have a CW, who is quite thin, both pre and post her two kids. when she was pregnant with one of them, her dr. asked if she was having any snacks, and she said yes, and then asked what. She said oh, a piece of fruit, maybe a few crackers, something like that. Now this CW eats very healthily, and doens't have an extra ounce on her. she's actuallly gained some weight sicne she had her kids, and she looks good; she was quite thin before.

Said dr. poo pooed her and said well, if you feel you NEEd a snack, have a tic tac. Yes, she actually said that. CW switched dr.'s shortly after that, but will still retell the "Dr. Tic Tac" story every now nad then,.

kherbert05

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #909 on: April 07, 2013, 04:30:22 PM »
My mother was an RN and she followed some realllllly stupid "rules" her doctor laid out. Many years later, she looked back and said, 'CRIVINS! was I thinking? I guess we were so brainwashed in nursing school about doctor=god, that we stopped thinking for ourselves." Amongst his priceless comments:

1. There is no such thing as morning sickness. Any woman who doesn't feel good during her pregnancy is just dramatic and/or a wimp and/or hates her unborn child.
2. Older children hate babies and should be kept away from them at all times. If an older child is left alone with a baby, they may smother it. Hence, when my sister was born, I was only allowed near her once the first year of her life-- at Xmas to take a picture. I have a clear memory of being allowed to stand near her in her bassinet and then being told to get out of the room.

Yikes - perfect recipe for sibling rivalry without end.

Sis  brought me a present because I had my heart set on an older brother. I decided to let her in the house.

The doctors or nurses at the NICU told my mom I had to be fed ever 2 hours (Under weight to begin with lost weight after birth due to having allergic reaction within a few hours of being born)

The first time she took me to a check up, a friend and neighbor had to drive us because Mom was falling down exhausted (Dad helped but had to work each day that included driving and being in a warehouse - mom insisted he sleep). My doctor told her that she was a smart woman and need to apply common sense to any orders. That she did not need to wake a sleeping baby. The doctors gave mom a script for vallium. Her friends made arrangements to babysit me, while Mom slept. Good thing - Mom took a 1/2 dose and wasn't coherent for 3 days.

The upshot was I was trained from an early age to ask questions about any medical procedure or instructions. I blew more than a few ER doc's and nurse's minds with the questions - including refusing certain medications (with my parents backing) because of a history of negative reactions to sedatives.
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

mmswm

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #910 on: April 07, 2013, 04:55:15 PM »
Doctors with god complexes are the worst.  Since I've just moved back to this area, I had to deal with a new ortho when oldest was hospitalized a few weeks ago. I originally went to one hospital because I thought the ortho they'd seen when they were little had retired (he hadn't, but isn't seeing new patients.) Anyway, this new guy was awful.  It was his way or the highway.  At some point the discussion turned to my youngest son and he made some statements as though his word was law without even knowing the whole story.  I looked at him nearly slack-jawed, told him that I no longer felt he could competently care for my children and walked out of the appointment.
Some people lift weights.  I lift measures.  It's a far more esoteric workout. - (Quoted from a personal friend)

artk2002

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #911 on: April 07, 2013, 06:22:50 PM »
Doctors with god complexes are the worst.  Since I've just moved back to this area, I had to deal with a new ortho when oldest was hospitalized a few weeks ago. I originally went to one hospital because I thought the ortho they'd seen when they were little had retired (he hadn't, but isn't seeing new patients.) Anyway, this new guy was awful.  It was his way or the highway.  At some point the discussion turned to my youngest son and he made some statements as though his word was law without even knowing the whole story.  I looked at him nearly slack-jawed, told him that I no longer felt he could competently care for my children and walked out of the appointment.

We were just condescended to by my son's pediatric GI doctor. He managed to insult: 1) His colleague, the allergist; 2) His nurses and staff; 3) Mrs.k2002, an RN, basically saying the he and only he knew anything about this particular issue. He then went on to tell us that we were very unusual in the amount of dairy that we have in our diet. He wanted my son to go dairy free and we explained that, unless there was an extremely strong reason to do so, we weren't going to comply. Although dairy is often implicated in the issue we are dealing with, it's not definitive and there weren't enough indicators (to us) to justify a change like that. The doctor (actually an osteopath, not an MD) told us that he and the people he knows didn't eat that much dairy and had no problem giving it up. The fact that he's a member of an ethnic group that is 90-100% lactose intolerant wouldn't have anything to with that one. [/sarcasm]

We're looking for a second opinion. He's far too invested in Z's problem being this particular syndrome.

Among the other things he did was to be very reluctant to tell us the quantitative value for a particular marker, claiming that it wasn't a definitive value. Except that every research paper abstract I read (and I spent a lot of time on PubMed) mentioned this particular threshold in the diagnosis. The pathologists report said "a few" and "some," and that, apparently, was good enough for him. Not good enough for me, I'm afraid.
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bow lines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.

MommyPenguin

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #912 on: April 07, 2013, 06:29:07 PM »
I went to see a doctor about a foot problem I had when I was in college.  For most of my life, I'd noticed that that particular foot was more sensitive.  For instance, if I accidentally stepped on the hose, or a stick, or something, so that it pressed on the bottom of the arch, it caused extreme pain... but only on that foot.  At one point it was bothering me enough that my dad took me to a doctor.  I was maybe 19-20, so not all that experienced at making myself heard and understood independently.  The doctor didn't even look at my foot, told me that I needed better arch support, told me to do some exercises (that hurt and felt *wrong* somehow), and that was it.  Arch support caused extreme pain on that foot and had been something we'd already tried (I have very high arches).  I remember feeling so condescended to that I cried after that appointment.  I was really just too inexperienced and didn't really know how to make myself understood, but the doctor also just seemed to think she knew what the problem was without even really examining me.  When we went to another doctor, he discovered a tumor in my foot.  I always sort of wanted to go back to that first doctor and say, "Ha!  See, there really was something wrong!"
Emily is 10 years old!  1/07
Jenny is 8 years old!  10/08
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Kariachi

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #913 on: April 07, 2013, 10:46:18 PM »
On the topic of doctors...

I was born healthy and on time, this is important. There were no problems, or at least none that anyone bothered to tell my parents about.

The doctor insisted that I had to eat a certain amount before I could go home, I can't remember how much off the top of my head. Certain amount, had to. And it had to be this special iron-supplemented formula 'cause I'm a girl and apparently the iron deficiencies start at birth.  ::)

Three days of getting my fluids through an iv later, after hearing about how something must be wrong with me because I wasn't eating,  my dad finally just grabbed a bottle of normal formula off a shelf.

Three bottles and about few hours later he was showing me off at the bar.  ;D
"Heh. Forgive our manners, little creature that we may well kill and eat you is no excuse for rudeness."

doodlemor

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Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Reply #914 on: April 07, 2013, 11:03:19 PM »
Doctors with god complexes are the worst.  Since I've just moved back to this area, I had to deal with a new ortho when oldest was hospitalized a few weeks ago. I originally went to one hospital because I thought the ortho they'd seen when they were little had retired (he hadn't, but isn't seeing new patients.) Anyway, this new guy was awful.  It was his way or the highway.  At some point the discussion turned to my youngest son and he made some statements as though his word was law without even knowing the whole story.  I looked at him nearly slack-jawed, told him that I no longer felt he could competently care for my children and walked out of the appointment.

We were just condescended to by my son's pediatric GI doctor. He managed to insult: 1) His colleague, the allergist; 2) His nurses and staff; 3) Mrs.k2002, an RN, basically saying the he and only he knew anything about this particular issue. He then went on to tell us that we were very unusual in the amount of dairy that we have in our diet. He wanted my son to go dairy free and we explained that, unless there was an extremely strong reason to do so, we weren't going to comply. Although dairy is often implicated in the issue we are dealing with, it's not definitive and there weren't enough indicators (to us) to justify a change like that. The doctor (actually an osteopath, not an MD) told us that he and the people he knows didn't eat that much dairy and had no problem giving it up. The fact that he's a member of an ethnic group that is 90-100% lactose intolerant wouldn't have anything to with that one. [/sarcasm]

We're looking for a second opinion. He's far too invested in Z's problem being this particular syndrome.

Among the other things he did was to be very reluctant to tell us the quantitative value for a particular marker, claiming that it wasn't a definitive value. Except that every research paper abstract I read (and I spent a lot of time on PubMed) mentioned this particular threshold in the diagnosis. The pathologists report said "a few" and "some," and that, apparently, was good enough for him. Not good enough for me, I'm afraid.

Slight threadjack here - One of my friends has a son who was tolerant to milk at some times of the year, and other times couldn't drink it.  They tracked this down to what the cows were eating during various seasons.  Once they knew when to avoid milk, all was fine.

Sometimes finding the source of a problem takes a lot of detective work.  Best of luck with your son, art.