Author Topic: Kids say the funniest things  (Read 216044 times)

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kherbert05

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Re: Kids say the funniest things
« Reply #1080 on: January 17, 2014, 07:26:13 PM »
So it wasn't really a cute kid thing since Deadson is 15, but we spent Christmas at a waterpark and themepark.  He drove the go-kart ride, when he got off he came and found me at the exit (Mrs. Deadbody was taking one of the Deaddaughters as well) and said

"Dad, I used to wonder why you swore so much when driving.  Now I understand, these people drive like idiots."

Not sure I am ready for him to drive yet :)  But he understands how to do it now, so that is a start.
My cousin posted about her 4 or 5 yo son. They were driving down a curvy road. Cam told her to take her foot off the brake so they could zoom, she should also take her hands off the wheel because when you are going downhill the car does all the work.


Her current plan is to rig his driving test so he can't pass.


I asked when her DH and BIL were going to put in the zip line at the farm - before or after the liger pen (Both boys love anything and everything about large cats they can find). Apparently we are now getting a zip line along with my archery range.
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Bluenomi

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Re: Kids say the funniest things
« Reply #1081 on: January 17, 2014, 10:07:24 PM »

"I'm sorry, honey, I couldn't understand you, can you look at me and ask me again?"
She stopped her twirly dance and said clear as a bell: "That's because I'm speaking French."
I repeated, "Asewee Dudah?"  She nodded.  "Yes, it's French."  I love how "it's French" is code for gobbledygook for little kids.  :)
It's perfectly understandable.  Someone on TV says something that they don't understand, another TV character says "It's French."  Therefore any word that one does not understand = French, which of course leads one to the corollary that any word one makes up ALSO = French.

I've always wondered what language the French use as their made up language.

Softly Spoken

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Re: Kids say the funniest things
« Reply #1082 on: January 17, 2014, 10:21:03 PM »

"I'm sorry, honey, I couldn't understand you, can you look at me and ask me again?"
She stopped her twirly dance and said clear as a bell: "That's because I'm speaking French."
I repeated, "Asewee Dudah?"  She nodded.  "Yes, it's French."  I love how "it's French" is code for gobbledygook for little kids.  :)
It's perfectly understandable.  Someone on TV says something that they don't understand, another TV character says "It's French."  Therefore any word that one does not understand = French, which of course leads one to the corollary that any word one makes up ALSO = French.

I've always wondered what language the French use as their made up language.

...or for that matter, what they say if they accidentally swear!  >:D
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OSUJillyBean

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Re: Kids say the funniest things
« Reply #1083 on: January 22, 2014, 02:47:44 PM »

"I'm sorry, honey, I couldn't understand you, can you look at me and ask me again?"
She stopped her twirly dance and said clear as a bell: "That's because I'm speaking French."
I repeated, "Asewee Dudah?"  She nodded.  "Yes, it's French."  I love how "it's French" is code for gobbledygook for little kids.  :)
It's perfectly understandable.  Someone on TV says something that they don't understand, another TV character says "It's French."  Therefore any word that one does not understand = French, which of course leads one to the corollary that any word one makes up ALSO = French.

I've always wondered what language the French use as their made up language.

...or for that matter, what they say if they accidentally swear!  >:D

I thought the stereotype of the French was that they were rude and wouldn't bother to apologize for offensive language?   ;D 

Elfmama

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Re: Kids say the funniest things
« Reply #1084 on: January 22, 2014, 04:40:25 PM »

"I'm sorry, honey, I couldn't understand you, can you look at me and ask me again?"
She stopped her twirly dance and said clear as a bell: "That's because I'm speaking French."
I repeated, "Asewee Dudah?"  She nodded.  "Yes, it's French."  I love how "it's French" is code for gobbledygook for little kids.  :)
It's perfectly understandable.  Someone on TV says something that they don't understand, another TV character says "It's French."  Therefore any word that one does not understand = French, which of course leads one to the corollary that any word one makes up ALSO = French.

I've always wondered what language the French use as their made up language.

...or for that matter, what they say if they accidentally swear!  >:D

I thought the stereotype of the French was that they were rude and wouldn't bother to apologize for offensive language?   ;D
I don't think so, not quite like that.  People tend to divide others into 'us' and 'them'.  You can then project your own worst qualities onto 'them.'  "Pardon my French," "Dutch courage," etc.
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Ms_Cellany

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Re: Kids say the funniest things
« Reply #1085 on: January 22, 2014, 05:38:46 PM »
I think "Pardon my French" comes from the English stereotype of the French as dirtyminded.
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baglady

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Re: Kids say the funniest things
« Reply #1086 on: January 22, 2014, 08:37:05 PM »
I'm reminded of a scene in the Stephen King book "It." I don't know if it was in the movie, because I've never seen it.

Guy is in a cab, and the driver is using lots of profanity. After every sentence with a profanity in it, he'd say, "Pardon my French if you're a religious man."

At the end of the ride, cabbie asks, "By the way, are you a religious man?"

Fare: "As a matter of fact, I am." (I don't think he was; he just wanted to see what the cabbie would say.)

Cabbie: "Then get outta my cab and go to (expletive) church!"
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Hollanda

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Re: Kids say the funniest things
« Reply #1087 on: January 23, 2014, 08:21:04 AM »
DS has discovered bodily functions. He knows what a "wee wee" is and what a "poo" is.
 
We were in a cafe having a cup of coffee.  I said to DH that I just needed to nip to the loo for a sec. Fine.
 
DS loudly shouts to the patrons of the cafe: "Mumma gone toilet. Mumma poo."  Thanks, darling.  Thanks so much.  :-[
 
 
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Thipu1

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Re: Kids say the funniest things
« Reply #1088 on: January 23, 2014, 01:29:03 PM »
I think "Pardon my French" comes from the English stereotype of the French as dirtyminded.

In English, when we don't understand something we often say, 'It's Greek to me.'

I remember an ad in the Paris Metro for the Berlitz language school.  On that, the equivalent of 'Greek' was 'Chinese'. 

Elfmama

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Re: Kids say the funniest things
« Reply #1089 on: January 23, 2014, 09:09:06 PM »
I think "Pardon my French" comes from the English stereotype of the French as dirtyminded.

In English, when we don't understand something we often say, 'It's Greek to me.'

I remember an ad in the Paris Metro for the Berlitz language school.  On that, the equivalent of 'Greek' was 'Chinese'.
"It's Greek to me" is from Shakespeare.  Maybe the French version is 'Chinese' because the Chinese languages are very difficult for those who don't speak tonal languages?
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twiggy

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Re: Kids say the funniest things
« Reply #1090 on: January 23, 2014, 10:59:41 PM »
Today I took the kiddos to the park, and we walked by a doggie present left in the grass. As we walked by, DD stopped chattering mid-sentence and looked at me in disgust and surprise.

DD:Mom! Did you fart?
Me: No.
DD: I think you did. Just tell the truth. I not be mad.
Me: It wasn't me. Look, we just walked by some dog poop.
DD: *giving me a very doubtful look* Um, I don't tink so. That stinky was in you bottom.
Me: *laughing* it wasn't me honey.
DD: Look at my eye...just tell the truth.

I don't think she was ever fully convinced, but she did eventually drop the issue.
In the United States today, there is a pervasive tendency to treat children as adults, and adults as children.  The options of children are thus steadily expanded, while those of adults are progressively constricted.  The result is unruly children and childish adults.  ~Thomas Szasz

Mental Magpie

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Re: Kids say the funniest things
« Reply #1091 on: January 24, 2014, 09:15:24 AM »
Speaking of stinky...

Six went to the bathroom just before DF got in the shower this morning. He comes back out and, laughing, says, "No more Taco Bell for you, child. How does something so stinky come out of something so little?!"

Six laughed, smiled, looked at me, and put her hand up for a high five.
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Snooks

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Re: Kids say the funniest things
« Reply #1092 on: February 02, 2014, 04:26:54 PM »

"I'm sorry, honey, I couldn't understand you, can you look at me and ask me again?"
She stopped her twirly dance and said clear as a bell: "That's because I'm speaking French."
I repeated, "Asewee Dudah?"  She nodded.  "Yes, it's French."  I love how "it's French" is code for gobbledygook for little kids.  :)
It's perfectly understandable.  Someone on TV says something that they don't understand, another TV character says "It's French."  Therefore any word that one does not understand = French, which of course leads one to the corollary that any word one makes up ALSO = French.

I've always wondered what language the French use as their made up language.

Similarly what nationality is the Swedish Chef when The Muppets is shown in Sweden?

faithlessone

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Re: Kids say the funniest things
« Reply #1093 on: February 02, 2014, 05:29:14 PM »

"I'm sorry, honey, I couldn't understand you, can you look at me and ask me again?"
She stopped her twirly dance and said clear as a bell: "That's because I'm speaking French."
I repeated, "Asewee Dudah?"  She nodded.  "Yes, it's French."  I love how "it's French" is code for gobbledygook for little kids.  :)
It's perfectly understandable.  Someone on TV says something that they don't understand, another TV character says "It's French."  Therefore any word that one does not understand = French, which of course leads one to the corollary that any word one makes up ALSO = French.

I've always wondered what language the French use as their made up language.

Similarly what nationality is the Swedish Chef when The Muppets is shown in Sweden?

I know this! NORWEGIAN. :D

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Kids say the funniest things
« Reply #1094 on: February 02, 2014, 10:35:48 PM »
Reminds me of the joke "In China do they just call it food?" Course I'm sure that just like what we Americans refer to as "Mexican" food is really our version of Mexican food, I'm sure the food that the Chinese eat is not quite what is made and served in American Chinese restaurants.

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