Author Topic: Does Oprah think we're dirty?  (Read 7863 times)

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Bluenomi

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Re: Does Oprah think we're dirty?
« Reply #60 on: December 23, 2010, 11:08:00 PM »
I had a friend that worked there for several years.  He worked in the remote middle.  He got this job when jobs were scarce.  After he accepted, he asked, "So why did the last guy leave?"  Turns out the last guy was camping in some even more remote place.  He was sleeping and a snake bit him in his tent.  He ran, and it ran after him!  They think that he stumbled as he ran, which allowed the snake to get him many more times.  He died. 
I desperately want to go, but I'll stick to underwater or in developed areas. 

I'd be careful in the water as well, we have sharks, crocs and jellyfish that can kill you pretty darn quickly  ;D Hmmm good thing I don't work for tourism Australia isn't it  ;)

Generally if you are sensible and listen to warnings from tour guide and locals you will be fine. It's the drunken twits who get themselves into trouble. And people who camp in the middle of the outback which no smart person would ever want to do.

boxy

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Re: Does Oprah think we're dirty?
« Reply #61 on: December 25, 2010, 03:17:11 AM »
KenveeB says:
Quote
They also have the only variety of snake known to stalk humans.
  Is it an Oprah snake?

Jan74

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Re: Does Oprah think we're dirty?
« Reply #62 on: December 25, 2010, 08:59:20 AM »
KenveeB says:
Quote
They also have the only variety of snake known to stalk humans.
  Is it an Oprah snake?

Only if it then talks down to the humans it stalks.  ;D

ShadesOfGrey

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Re: Does Oprah think we're dirty?
« Reply #63 on: December 25, 2010, 09:52:58 AM »
I absolutely agree with you about every country dealing with foreigners holding stereotyes.  It's easy to get caught up in these, but the fact is that we all do it to every other country.  One of my best friends is from the U.S. and the ridiculous comments she has to deal with blow my mind constantly. 

The thing is, Oprah isn't a foreign entertainer visiting - Australia is large enough to have foreign entertainers visiting constantly, there's nothing special about that - but she is doing something quite different.   She is doing a "C'mon everybody and see one of my Favourite Things, it's Australia, isn't it soooo cute? I Loooooooove it!! It's the home of kangaroos and koalas and Steve Irwin and good ole Aussie stuff... and see, I can even mimick their accent and talk like them!  I'm going to tell you everything about Australia and then you'll all want to come down here and spend your money and help their economy, isn't that nice of me?"  and y'know what?  Most of that is actual summary of what she's actually said this week (including the looooooove australia part, lol).  It's all about how different Australia is - they way people talk, the way they spend their time, etc.   When in all honesty, there is very little difference between our countries.  Sure, there's subtle differences in lifestyle, but for the most part all Western cultures are fairly similar.  I think she means it in a good way, showing off the "uniqueness" but it comes across as simply highlighting stereotypes from 20 years ago.

For the record, I'm not Australian. But I am currently living in Sydney and see all the hype.  I do think it's patronising, and it's accentuating stereotypes.  Having said that, as I said previously I think she has good intetions and she's completely sincere in her viewpoints.  And it's doing amazing things for tourism and the economy.  So I think the problem is that there's a certain resentment that she's coming here and doing this, while at the same time people are really excited that she's coming here and doing this.... anyway, that's my perception.  It's certainly beeen a MAJOR talking point the past few weeks. And front page news.

Isnt this just as dismissive as you say she's being? 
Words mean more than what is set down on paper. It takes the human voice to infuse them with shades of deeper meaning. - Maya Angelou

I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel. - Maya Angelou

Ceallach

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Re: Does Oprah think we're dirty?
« Reply #64 on: December 26, 2010, 06:52:15 AM »
I absolutely agree with you about every country dealing with foreigners holding stereotyes.  It's easy to get caught up in these, but the fact is that we all do it to every other country.  One of my best friends is from the U.S. and the ridiculous comments she has to deal with blow my mind constantly. 

The thing is, Oprah isn't a foreign entertainer visiting - Australia is large enough to have foreign entertainers visiting constantly, there's nothing special about that - but she is doing something quite different.   She is doing a "C'mon everybody and see one of my Favourite Things, it's Australia, isn't it soooo cute? I Loooooooove it!! It's the home of kangaroos and koalas and Steve Irwin and good ole Aussie stuff... and see, I can even mimick their accent and talk like them!  I'm going to tell you everything about Australia and then you'll all want to come down here and spend your money and help their economy, isn't that nice of me?"  and y'know what?  Most of that is actual summary of what she's actually said this week (including the looooooove australia part, lol).  It's all about how different Australia is - they way people talk, the way they spend their time, etc.   When in all honesty, there is very little difference between our countries.  Sure, there's subtle differences in lifestyle, but for the most part all Western cultures are fairly similar.  I think she means it in a good way, showing off the "uniqueness" but it comes across as simply highlighting stereotypes from 20 years ago.

For the record, I'm not Australian. But I am currently living in Sydney and see all the hype.  I do think it's patronising, and it's accentuating stereotypes.  Having said that, as I said previously I think she has good intetions and she's completely sincere in her viewpoints.  And it's doing amazing things for tourism and the economy.  So I think the problem is that there's a certain resentment that she's coming here and doing this, while at the same time people are really excited that she's coming here and doing this.... anyway, that's my perception.  It's certainly beeen a MAJOR talking point the past few weeks. And front page news.

Isnt this just as dismissive as you say she's being? 

Yes, in a way.  You could say that she is highlighting our differences and implying that they are significant, while I am noting our similarities and that they are significant.  And, like I said, I'm not Australian, so I'm noting this based on my observations, not personal feelings. And, yes I think it's great to acknowledge the uniqueness of a nation - as Steve Irwin did, although he was actually mocked and parodied for it. I would love to see some similar attention given to some of the uniqueness of the U.S., because it's rare in popular media for us to see anything beyond old Westerns depicting the Native American people. That is why Oprah's show is great - for some people Australia *is* unique and special, even though our everyday lives are almost identical to those over there. But at the end of the day she is making it for her U.S. audience.  So it's not a show for Australia, she's using Australia to make her show for the U.S., and showing off the differences, the stereotypes, the Aussie tourism icons from the 80s. The audience here weren't being an "Oprah" audience, they were being an Aussie Aussie Aussie audience to be shown on her show. Not saying that's necessarily bad, but it is true. Like I said in my previous post, we all do it to every other nation. We do tend to focus on differences.

Btw, you didn't need to make your quoted text massive, the bold would suffice.   (Just for future reference).

"Nobody can do everything, but everybody can do something"


KenveeB

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Re: Does Oprah think we're dirty?
« Reply #65 on: December 26, 2010, 10:23:03 AM »
I've lived in or visited 13 different countries and 34 different US states, and all have their own unique flavors and cultures.  Even though their everyday lives may be roughly similar, there are a lot of differences in traditions, history, food, leisure activities, etc.  If you're trying to encourage tourism, like Oprah was, then you emphasize those differences, because that's what people who want to travel want to experience.  There's nothing wrong or patronizing in that.

MannerMOG

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Re: Does Oprah think we're dirty?
« Reply #66 on: December 26, 2010, 12:11:18 PM »
I've made some wonderful Aussie friends who have come to visit me in the US.  We've basically found just a few lifestyle differences that you might find funny.  I apologize if these are weird to anyone; it was just our experience, and yours may vary:

US - have more kinds of convenience food in cans (crescent roll dough, chicken, etc.).  My friend went to Costco and took some chicken home!
Aussie - generally line dry their clothes (I shrunk someone's in the dryer)

US - kids aren't allowed to wear hats in school
Aussie - kids must wear hats on the playground because of dangerous ozone level

ShadesOfGrey

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Re: Does Oprah think we're dirty?
« Reply #67 on: December 26, 2010, 05:18:38 PM »
I'm aware of the tools available to me to make the text noticeable, and I chose the ones I did for a reason. 
Words mean more than what is set down on paper. It takes the human voice to infuse them with shades of deeper meaning. - Maya Angelou

I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel. - Maya Angelou

Ceallach

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Re: Does Oprah think we're dirty?
« Reply #68 on: December 26, 2010, 06:05:31 PM »
I'm aware of the tools available to me to make the text noticeable, and I chose the ones I did for a reason. 

I respect that, but Fyi the big text came across as shouting.


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Ceallach

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Re: Does Oprah think we're dirty?
« Reply #69 on: December 26, 2010, 06:11:20 PM »
I've made some wonderful Aussie friends who have come to visit me in the US.  We've basically found just a few lifestyle differences that you might find funny.  I apologize if these are weird to anyone; it was just our experience, and yours may vary:

US - have more kinds of convenience food in cans (crescent roll dough, chicken, etc.).  My friend went to Costco and took some chicken home!
Aussie - generally line dry their clothes (I shrunk someone's in the dryer)

US - kids aren't allowed to wear hats in school
Aussie - kids must wear hats on the playground because of dangerous ozone level

My favourites are the slight variations in language - my best friend is American and another close friend is British, and sometimes we play the "what do you call this?" game.  Because it's always random, small items that somehow have ended up being called completely different things!

What's the deal with the no hat rule? Does that mean the kids can't wear sunhats on the playground at all?

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Spoder

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Re: Does Oprah think we're dirty?
« Reply #70 on: December 26, 2010, 10:58:05 PM »
I've lived in or visited 13 different countries and 34 different US states, and all have their own unique flavors and cultures.  Even though their everyday lives may be roughly similar, there are a lot of differences in traditions, history, food, leisure activities, etc.  If you're trying to encourage tourism, like Oprah was, then you emphasize those differences, because that's what people who want to travel want to experience.  There's nothing wrong or patronizing in that.

I agree, KenveeB. Although to be honest, to me Oprah comes across as patronizing most of the time - on her show, and just in general. I think it's just her manner. It's very hard to put my finger on, but there's a certain type of talk-show gushiness she has that doesn't go over so well with some Australians. Our 'style' tends to be a little more reticent and therefore she can seem insincere.

That said, I don't think she patronized Australia or Australians in particular, and her visit can only have been a good thing for our country, economically.

Aeris

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Re: Does Oprah think we're dirty?
« Reply #71 on: December 26, 2010, 10:58:54 PM »
What's the deal with the no hat rule? Does that mean the kids can't wear sunhats on the playground at all?

Hm. I'm not sure many US kids actually have 'sunhats'. Kids have baseball hats and whatnot mostly. But I know when I was in school we just weren't allowed to have hats in school period. I'm not sure anyone ever attempted to wear a hat *just* on the playground, and nowhere else. I actually dont' know how they would have handled that. It just never came up.

KenveeB

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Re: Does Oprah think we're dirty?
« Reply #72 on: December 26, 2010, 11:38:07 PM »
What's the deal with the no hat rule? Does that mean the kids can't wear sunhats on the playground at all?

Hm. I'm not sure many US kids actually have 'sunhats'. Kids have baseball hats and whatnot mostly. But I know when I was in school we just weren't allowed to have hats in school period. I'm not sure anyone ever attempted to wear a hat *just* on the playground, and nowhere else. I actually dont' know how they would have handled that. It just never came up.

At my school, kids would wear ballcaps on the playground and outside.  They'd only be told to take them off indoors.  You'd just have it in your backpack or locker then.

Spoder

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Re: Does Oprah think we're dirty?
« Reply #73 on: December 26, 2010, 11:47:36 PM »
At the school my nieces and nephews go to, the rule is 'no hat, no play'. The hat is part of the school uniform and is in the school colours, and has a brim to shade the face and neck. If they forget their hat, they have to sit in the shade of the verandah at break times while the other kids play outside. When they go inside for class they have to take the hat off.

With the high skin-cancer rate in Australia, I think it's an excellent rule.

Alex the Seal

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Re: Does Oprah think we're dirty?
« Reply #74 on: December 26, 2010, 11:49:40 PM »
What's the deal with the no hat rule? Does that mean the kids can't wear sunhats on the playground at all?

Hm. I'm not sure many US kids actually have 'sunhats'. Kids have baseball hats and whatnot mostly. But I know when I was in school we just weren't allowed to have hats in school period. I'm not sure anyone ever attempted to wear a hat *just* on the playground, and nowhere else. I actually dont' know how they would have handled that. It just never came up.

Oh I wish I'd been an American child, I hate the feeling of hats on my head  :P

I'm not sure how many Aussie kids really ran around in 'sun hats' as such either, the most common style of hat I remember was like a baseball cap but with an opaque fabric 'veil' down the back to protect little ears and necks. I think they might be a uniquely Australian invention. And there were the round fabric hats with strings and a toggle to keep them from blowing off.

These are the best pics I could find:
http://headwearpromotions.com.au/products/Slouch_Hat_Poly_Cotton-17-6.html
http://headwearpromotions.com.au/products/Legionnaire_Hat_School-512-10.html